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How do you know if a hard drive is compatible?

by monkeysateme / November 15, 2005 7:32 AM PST

Ho shall I know if a hard drive is compatible with my computer?

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ide, sata, or scsi....
by circusjojo / November 15, 2005 8:34 AM PST

that generally narrows it down, it depends on what controllers you have on your motherboard. ide controller, ide compatable hard drive. i might be generalizing, but that should get you started in the right direction

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Is there a good online tutorial for this?
by monkeysateme / November 15, 2005 8:40 AM PST
In reply to: ide, sata, or scsi....

Is there an online tutorial with all the info i need to know about replacing a hard drive?

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I found out...
by monkeysateme / November 15, 2005 8:42 AM PST

it's IDE, is that all i need to know?

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size matters
by linkit / November 15, 2005 9:36 AM PST
In reply to: I found out...
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How do I know if a hard drive is an IDE?
by monkeysateme / November 15, 2005 10:19 AM PST
In reply to: size matters

Well, how do I know?

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How do you know?
by linkit / November 15, 2005 10:48 AM PST

Read the description of the hard drive. Read its specifications.

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Alot of them don't specify
by monkeysateme / November 16, 2005 6:34 AM PST
In reply to: How do you know?

Alot of them don't specify

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specifications
by linkit / November 16, 2005 9:49 AM PST

The specifications for the HD on the retail box or online will tell you enough information. If you are looking at your old hard drive, the model number on the drive is enough to do a search online. You can also get the name and model number from Windows utilities like Belarc Advisor, Everest Home Edition, and the built-in System Information utility in Windows XP.

Do you have a link to an example? Can you provide the model number of the current HD?

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many tutorials
by linkit / November 15, 2005 10:45 AM PST

There are tutorials everywhere. Hard drive mfgs. and system makers usually have nice tutorials with pictures. New HD's in retail packages also have quick installation guide. Check first with on the computer mfg's website to see how to change the drive for your particular computer model.

What is the mfg and model number of the computer?

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Not that kind of tutorial
by monkeysateme / November 16, 2005 6:44 AM PST
In reply to: many tutorials

I meant one that had all of the info about compatibility

What's an MFG?

My Computer:
IBM
XP
Model E4N

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hmmm...
by linkit / November 16, 2005 9:44 AM PST

Hard drives (HD) have been around for decades, and there is a long history of development and compatibility. Therefore, you aren't going to find a concise tutorial on all the different HD technologies. You would be reading a good sized technical manual. Circusjojo gave you a good start on the 3 main technologies of the past decade--SCSI, IDE, and SATA.

SCSI historically has been the HD for servers and Macintosh computers. Macs switched over to IDE drives on many of their machines in the mid 1990's.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scsi

IDE drives historically have been in MS Windows machines. The term ''IDE'' is often misused because it encompases a large area of technology (not just one type of hard drive and not just hard drives). Many use the term ''IDE'' to mean any Parallel ATA (PATA) HD and not SATA and not SCSI.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Advanced_Technology_Attachment

SATA or Serial ATA is a newer technology that would not be found in a computer as old as yours.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sata

A good way to approach it is to find out what type of HD is currently in the computer and then get one of those. Your computer seems to be a Windows machine from 1999. AMD processor 350MHz? Anyway, it would have a PATA HD. Maybe it is an early EIDE drive or possibly an ATA/33 or ATA/66 drive at the fastest.

TO GET ANSWERS HERE, YOU NEED TO PROVIDE MORE INFO:
Download and run Belarc Advisor and tell us what the full name of your IBM E4N is. Tell us the motherboard (system board) model mumber. Tell us the make and model of your current HD.

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Here's the info
by monkeysateme / November 16, 2005 11:12 AM PST
In reply to: hmmm...

I have IDE ATA/ATAPI controllers
and the hard drive I have now is a Maxtor 90840D5

I am also considering building a computer from scratch, but I need a way to know if everything is compatible. Are there some guides where it tells you what kind of video cards work on what kind of motherboard, what kind of ram works, etc..

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Maxtor 90840D5
by linkit / November 16, 2005 12:20 PM PST
In reply to: Here's the info

Quick search on the internet for Maxtor 90840D5:
8.4GB
33.3MB/s = ATA/33 (Ultra ATA 33MB/s)
Buffer (cache) Size: 256KB
Rotational Speed: 5400rpm

This means that it is extremely likely that you will have a BIOS problem with upgrading the current machine with a larger HD. You will be limited to an 8.4GB or 32GB maximum HD with the motherboard.
http://www.seagate.com/support/kb/disc/capacity/index.html

Today's mainstream PC drives are:
Much larger (typically 80GB to 400GB)
ATA/100, ATA/133, SATA 150, SATA 300/II
8MB cache or larger
7200rpm or faster

I think you are wise not to upgrade, but start anew. Either buy new or build. Everyone I know who builds one finds it to be quite rewarding (myself included). For the most part, they don't want to buy a prebuilt machine ever again, unless it is a fantastic deal.

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tons of information
by linkit / November 16, 2005 12:35 PM PST
In reply to: Here's the info

google:
''build your own pc''

Search CNet forums:
''build your own''


The first thing you need to ask yourself is how you will use the computer. Gaming, high-end gaming, video editing, graphic design, programming, word processing browsing and email, general use, accounting, CAD, etc. That will lead you to a CPU choice. Everything will start to fall into place when you search for a motherboard that is compatible with your CPU.

If you have never even upgraded a PC before, you need to do a little reading. You can do this online or get a book like this one:
http://www.dummies.com/WileyCDA/DummiesTitle/productCd-0471767727.html
(No insult intended with the ''Dummies'' book. They are fantastic resources.)

If you want recommendations for websites that have good step-by-step instructions on what to do, I strongly suggest creating a new discussion (the green button), rather than burying that request in this discussion about hard drives. You will get a lot of suggestions. Make sure you post what you want to be able to do with your new computer.

Hope this helps.

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Ok thanks
by monkeysateme / November 17, 2005 6:44 AM PST
In reply to: tons of information

I ahve googled and searched cnet, but Google gives me a bunch of sites from 98 and they don't talk about compatibility. Cnet's build your own computer didn't talk about a motherboard.

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new discussion
by sanworker / November 18, 2005 12:38 AM PST
In reply to: tons of information

Found this discussion interesting, and may someday soon be faced with the same situation. My Dell is on its last year renewable warranty and about to expire, and my HD is going to be 4 yrs old. I would like to also put in a bigger and faster HD before the oem drive starts to act up. I have a Dell Dimension 8200 with a 40gb drive and a little interest adding another drive and also maybe building my own system some day. You recommended to "monkeysateme" to start a new discussion, if they did that, where would one find that discussion?

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wherever you wish
by linkit / November 18, 2005 5:09 AM PST
In reply to: new discussion

Go to the CNet Forums home page:
http://reviews.cnet.com/4520-7600_7-5565323-1.html

Click the forum in which you wish to start a new discussion. Click the Create New Discussion button at the top of the forum. Your discussion topic will appear at the top of that particular forum. Everytime a new reply is posted to your discussion, the entire discussion gets bumped to the top of the list for that particular forum.

You can see all of your forum posts and discussions by looking at your profile

More info from the CNet forum FAQ:
http://reviews.cnet.com/4520-7600_7-5565360-1.html?tag=dir.forum

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maybe not clear
by sanworker / November 18, 2005 9:12 AM PST
In reply to: wherever you wish

I may of not have been clear so I will try again. What I was asking was, if "monkeysateme" decided to start a new discussion as you recommended to him, to inquire about building a new system how could this new discussion be discovered or followed? Could a new discussion or all discussions by a particular member be tracked by anyone other than themselves? I would like to follow his situation and questions because they would be similar to my mine.
thanks

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I made another discussion
by monkeysateme / November 18, 2005 10:15 AM PST
In reply to: maybe not clear

I have made some new ones click on my name and you will get my profile and from there go to "my posts" It will show all the posts I have made.

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hello
by waqasAhmed390 / November 7, 2008 8:23 AM PST
In reply to: hmmm...

Sup! my name is Waqas. I was wondering what kind of hard drive would need because I want to upgrade my hard drive. I download the Belarc Advisor it telling this HDS728080PLA380 [Hard drive] (66.63 GB) -- drive 0, s/n PF2H27SWUTLVWY, rev PF2OA69A, SMART Status: Healthy

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(NT) (NT) mfg. = manufacturer
by linkit / November 16, 2005 9:49 AM PST
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(NT) (NT) also, what operating system is the computer running?
by linkit / November 15, 2005 10:49 AM PST
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Question about pin connection on hard drives
by shermanwood / November 18, 2005 5:33 AM PST

I'm old school in that I'm used to seeing the multiple pin (39 pins) connection on hard drives. I recently bought a new Dell and thought I would take a 160GB drive I had in a drawer and upgrade the machine but when I opened it up it was clear from the size of the cable and the plug that there are far fewer pins required for the hard drive on this machine. What's the story on this??????

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(NT) SATA or SATA 3Gb/s
by blackheart1313 / November 21, 2005 2:08 AM PST

i'm in the market for a new custom computer but i have one question i need answered before i continue. I've been looking at motherboards that have a SATA 3Gb/s controler, i have found some hard drives for that controler, but the hard drive that i want as the boot drive does not come in SATA 3Gb/s. My question is will a SATA hard drive run in a SATA 3Gb/s controler like the USB 1.1 and USB 2, or should i just wait for the SATA 3Gb/s version of that hard drive to be released?
For you reference the drive that i'm refering to is the WD Raptor 74GB and the motherboard that i have my eye on is the ASUS A8N-E.

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how do I know if a hard drive is compatable with my computer
by dbluvss / November 24, 2005 11:45 PM PST

I have a Toshiba Equium 7100. It is a great computer. However I tried to put a new scsi hard drive in and computer would not recognize it. I tried to boot up from my windows boot disk. I have windows xp professional service pack II. I was told I don't need the format diskette. I was told to just put the operating disk in and it will load up. any truth in that. Could I make it a slave?

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hd went code purple
by heindl01 / April 30, 2012 2:36 AM PDT

hi guys i need help
i built a new pc last month and i used my old hd i restored it to factory setting when i booted it up it went to code purple and went bad bad according to compaq. which is np b/c i own and another hd when trying to add this hd its refusing to load windows with a giant word that says failed. idk what to do i dont have enough money to buy 1 or take it to the shop plzzzzz can ne 1 help me ive looked all over the internet. the hd is coming from a dell e521

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