Networking & Wireless forum

Question

How do i connect two wifi routers together wirelessly?

by Arransmurphy / April 20, 2012 6:02 AM PDT

Hi there - i currently own 2 wifi routers which have 4 lan ports on the back. In my room i have two desktops without wireless capability. I was wondering is it possible to have one router in my room which my desktops plug into - and then the router to ""Bridge" with the one downstairs to give me wireless capability.
I believe its called bridging but i have had no hopen as of yet.
Huawei HG520b and Huawei HG532 are my two routers.
I know this can be done by purchasing a wire - but i cannot afford a 100m cable and i am not particularly interested in purchasing an adapter for my desktops.
Thank you

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Clarification Request
I don't see that as working
by Steven Haninger / April 20, 2012 10:32 AM PDT

For a wireless bridge, you need both in bridge mode. This, in essence, locks the two devices onto one another. You'd need additional wireless access points to provide a signal to the areas you desire. I've not done this myself, however.

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Partial mistake on my part
by Steven Haninger / April 21, 2012 2:46 AM PDT

Here's a reasonable explanation of how to do this on youtube. I was in error stating that both wireless devices would need to be in bridge mode. Only the remote device will. But, once that device is in bridge mode, it will no longer provide a wireless signal to PCs. You would need another AP connected to it or, if it had wired ports, use those. Good luck.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7nTgQQbF9zo

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Internet acsess?
by Arransmurphy / April 21, 2012 7:54 AM PDT

The reason i am wanting this - is so that i can use my downstairs router as a wireless router for laptops downstairs and to give my upstairs router internet acsess, how do i go about this?

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If you had a bridge mode capable router
by Steven Haninger / April 21, 2012 9:47 AM PDT
In reply to: Internet acsess?

with wired ports, that would probably work. I've seen APs offer bridge mode but not routers. You'd first need to visit both of your routers' configuration options to see if either offers it. If not, you try and find some firmware to replace that of one of your routers that offers bridge mode. Keep in mind that doing so might render a router incapable of acting as a router. As well, any wireless bridge broadcast is locked to a single device by MAC address. A bridged AP cannot provide a signal to PCs as well as be a bridge.

If I'm envisioning this correctly, your router is downstairs and you want the signal in an upstairs room and the upstairs room has PCs that will be wired to a switch. BTW, the wired ports on a router are actually a switch. I can think of two options. If the signal from the downstairs router is strong enough to contact an upstairs bridge, I don't see why the signal can't reach the PCs directly. You might be able to use something as simple as a USB wifi adapter. But, if you want to bridge the two areas via wireless, you will probably need to purchase a dedicated bridge device or an AP with that capability. If you wanted to use Ethernet to the PCs in your room, you'd need small switch to connect to the wireless bridge device.

I can't be confident that you can accomplish what you wish with what you now own. Sorry but guess I can't help. Perhaps someone here has a better idea or knows if one of your routers offers a firmware replacement that would be suitable.

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Here's more and, if you could do this, might work
by Steven Haninger / April 22, 2012 12:42 AM PDT
In reply to: Internet acsess?
http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/how-to-turn-an-old-router-into-a-wireless-bridge/

You'll see a link to an open source firmware replacement. From there you'll find a list of supported devices. Unfortunately, I don't see your routers in the list. I also don't see them in the list of compatible router but I also don't see them in the list of incompatible routers. I suppose this gives you the option to try this on your own if you don't mind running the risk of bricking one of your devices.
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Thank You
by Arransmurphy / April 24, 2012 5:55 AM PDT

Thank you for looking and commenting on the post - i will now put this to good use Happy

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