TVs & Home Theaters forum

Question

High quality surge protector advice needed

by C-Little / July 10, 2013 8:54 AM PDT
I would appreciate everyone's professional opinions regarding high quality surge protectors.


This is what I am thinking about buying for my TV, DVR, and internet connection, AT&T gateway modem, AT&T U-verse connections, and stereo system (a living room entertainment center).....


Which one of the 2 below do you think is better.

http://www.tripplite.com/en/products/model.cfm?txtSeriesID=825&txtModelID=2814

http://www.tripplite.com/en/products/model.cfm?txtSeriesID=829&txtModelID=2813


This is what I am thinking about buying for my laptops and will also be connected to a stereo system .....


http://www.tripplite.com/en/products/model.cfm?txtSeriesID=825&txtModelID=106


I sincerely appreciate everyone's professional opinions because I am considering buying approx. $195 in surge protectors total from Tripp Lite.

Also, if anyone has any better recommendations as far as quality, total surge protection, and surge protector manufacturers please reply.
Answer This Ask For Clarification
Discussion is locked
You are posting a reply to: High quality surge protector advice needed
The posting of advertisements, profanity, or personal attacks is prohibited. Please refer to our CNET Forums policies for details. All submitted content is subject to our Terms of Use.
Track this discussion and email me when there are updates

If you're asking for technical help, please be sure to include all your system info, including operating system, model number, and any other specifics related to the problem. Also please exercise your best judgment when posting in the forums--revealing personal information such as your e-mail address, telephone number, and address is not recommended.

You are reporting the following post: High quality surge protector advice needed
This post has been flagged and will be reviewed by our staff. Thank you for helping us maintain CNET's great community.
Sorry, there was a problem flagging this post. Please try again now or at a later time.
If you believe this post is offensive or violates the CNET Forums' Usage policies, you can report it below (this will not automatically remove the post). Once reported, our moderators will be notified and the post will be reviewed.
Collapse -
Clarification Request
What made you think to add these?
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / July 10, 2013 9:04 AM PDT

Keep in mind that some areas are hit with lightning and keeping in mind that a "hand of God" strike is not stopped by such, can you share why these are needed?

About laptops. In the USA almost all laptops come with 100 to 240 VAC 50/60 Hz power adapters. So with nearly double the voltage capability can you tell why folk worry about this? And if said power lines did soar that often wouldn't your light bulbs blow out first?
Bob

Collapse -
High quality surge protectors
by C-Little / July 10, 2013 9:25 AM PDT

The reason I am looking for high quality surge protectors is I live in an area prone to power surges due to our local electric company, as well as power surges related to winter weather. Also, I do not want any of the junk sold by Big Box stores.
Example, the second one shown above has a 3840 joule
rating plus a built in circuit breaker, and gives $500,000 of insurance protection ..... most surge protectors sold by big
box store provide much less of protection in terms of joules and warranties.


All of the surge protectors I posted above by Tripp Lite provide well over 3,000 joules of protection .... plus most have a lifetime guarantee, if they ever stop working they will send you a new one for free. Additionally it is a lot cheaper than replacing your surge protectors every 10 years.

Collapse -
Keep in mind that and a few other makers
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / July 10, 2013 9:37 AM PDT

Do a great job of selling such gear. Now take this with a grain of salt (or a pound) and it's easy to find folk that have had issues with this maker.

https://duckduckgo.com/?q=tripplite+junk

Frankly, if they moved their production overseas, I'd shop another brand.
Bob

Collapse -
PS. Who am I?
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / July 10, 2013 9:40 AM PDT

Just an electronics designer with some designs long ago in 2-way pager systems that were deployed in far off places that had to endure near lightning strikes. No one I know will warrant a direct hit (AKA "hand of God.")

My personal choice has been to protect everything with many devices. Anyone that thinks a single box or two will soak up the hit is dreaming. Add protection as you can over the years and in a short while your whole house total protection will add up to a lot of Joules.
Bob

Collapse -
Get it over with and make your sales pitch
by itsdigger / July 10, 2013 10:22 AM PDT

so we can tell you that we don't like spam and Get Outta Our Forum

Collapse -
To itsdigger
by C-Little / July 10, 2013 12:23 PM PDT

As I stated below, I am not one of those people who buy thousands of dollars worth of electrical items as well as computers then connect it to a cheap quality surge protector.

That is why I am asking for other people's professional advice regarding high quality surge protectors.

Collapse -
High quality surge protector
by C-Little / July 10, 2013 9:58 AM PDT

Another reason I am looking for high quality surge protectors, is all to often you hear/read about cheaper quality surge protectors (often like those sold at Big Box Stores) malfunctioning, the plastic type melting, or not providing protection after a good power surge.

As a result, they have to be replaced if you want to protect all your electronic items and computers.

As stated above these provide more Joules than most surge protectors sold at Big Box stores, and have a lifetime guarantee so if they ever stop working they will send you a new one for free. In the long run that is a lot cheaper than having to buy new surge protectors.

Bob, as far as your question "if said power lines did soar that often wouldn't your light bulbs blow out first?" My answer to that is no. In there past 4 years my neighborhood has been hit by several strong power surges. The last one caused by our utility company was strong enough to melt the wiring in my neighbors house .... none of my neighbors light bulbs blew out yet the electrical lines inside their housed were melted and were smoking.

Collapse -
This is bordering on shill and spam.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / July 10, 2013 10:13 AM PDT

It sounds as if they have you sold. So why repeat this over and over and make it sound as if you are a shill or spammer.

They've got you sold so what's stopping you now?
Bob

Collapse -
High quality surge protector advice needed
by C-Little / July 10, 2013 10:44 AM PDT

Not at all. You asked a question so I replied.

Think to yourself, why would I buy thousands of dollars worth of electrical items as well as computers then not ask for other people's "professional advice" regarding high quality surge protectors. I am not one of those people who buy thousands of dollars worth of electrical items as well as computers then connect it to a cheap quality surge protector.

Once again if anyone has any better recommendations as far as quality, total surge protection, and surge protector manufacturers please reply.

Collapse -
why not buy all that you asked about?
by itsdigger / July 10, 2013 11:01 AM PDT

and get it outta your hair and than no worries, just hook them up in a series and keep those thousands of dollars really secure and that way you have all your bases covered and you can stop being such a PITA.

Collapse -
High quality surge protector advice needed
by C-Little / July 10, 2013 11:15 AM PDT

Are you an electrical engineer or electronics professional? I didn't think so, and neither am I which is why I am asking for other peoples "professional advice".

By profession I am a manager for a DJIA listed company so I always do my own research then seek other people's "Professional Advice".

Once again if anyone has any better recommendations as far as quality, total surge protection, and surge protector manufacturers please reply.

Collapse -
ever heard of Redundant?
by itsdigger / July 10, 2013 11:19 AM PDT

I didn't think so

Collapse -
Sorry but this has gone on long enough.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / July 10, 2013 11:07 AM PDT

You're sold. While I may write anything TrippLite has bought you out so why would you consider anything else? Even an electrician would and could install protection in your main panel but would you have it done?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wrY4fFSESGw for example.

Why not nip the spike where you say it comes in?

Remember your posts are borderline spam and exactly what a person that sells Tripplite will write.
Even you are not comparing any other device. Spam is not welcome here.
Bob

Collapse -
And here's a name for you to use.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / July 10, 2013 11:33 AM PDT
Collapse -
High quality surge protector advice needed
by C-Little / July 10, 2013 11:35 AM PDT

Looks like I may have to go with my original idea and send a letter to CNET on our corporate letterhead asking for their "Professional Advice". That's what I was hoping to avoid having to do, which is why I posted my original question at the top of this thread.

Appreciate your replies, I just figured there may be someone on the CNET forums who could provide "professional advice" regarding high quality surge protectors.

Collapse -
I see you have posted what looks like spam.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / July 10, 2013 11:39 AM PDT
Collapse -
High quality surge protector advice needed
by C-Little / July 10, 2013 1:38 PM PDT

Thanks Bob, that is little closer to the type of advice I am seeking regard high quality surge protectors.

As I posted at the top of this thread .... one of the surge protectors will be connected to my internet TV, DVR, internet connection, AT&T gateway, AT&T U-verse connections, and stereo system (a living room entertainment center).

It will also be mounted on the wall behind a large Drexel Heritage armoire that holds part of the living room entertainment center. As a result, I would like to find a high quality surge protector that also has an "audible alarm" in case the surge protector goes out while I am not home in order to hopefully protect/alert my children. From what I found at Tripp Lite's website they DO NOT have a high quality surge protector with an audible alarm, they only have those in their lower quality models.

Additionally, it will have to have connections for a internet AT&T 2Wire internet connection. One of the reasons why is last winter my AT&T 2Wire gateway got fried due to a power surge. I ended up being without internet connection for 3 days and being a financial professional I can not be without internet connection at my residence for that long so would like to have the surge protector also have internet connections to provide more protection for the AT&T 2Wire gateway.

That is why I want to find at least ONE high quality surge protector that hopefully has both an audible alarm as well as provides more protection for my internet connections (the wireless gateway). I am also looking at the total Joules ratings as a part of my purchase decision.

Collapse -
To R. Proffitt
by C-Little / July 10, 2013 1:53 PM PDT

One of other options I am considering is a "Whole House Surge Protector".

That way it would provide more protection to all appliances, overhead electric garage door, as well as for all electronic items and computers in my house.

The type I am talking about connects to the circuit breaker box to provide whole house surge protection.

That is another reason why I am asking for people's professional advice regarding high quality individual surge protectors before I make my final purchase decision(s).

Collapse -
Different protectors
by w_tom / July 10, 2013 10:38 PM PDT
In reply to: To R. Proffitt

> One of other options I am considering is a "Whole House Surge Protector".

Use concepts even introduced in elementary school science to separate hearsay from hard facts. Lightning seeks earth ground. A path for a 20,000 amp surge is via a wooden church steeple, destructively, to earth. Wood is not a good conductor. So 20,000 amps creates a high voltage. 20,000 amps times a high voltage is high energy. Church steeple damaged.

Franklin installed a lightning rod. Now 20,000 amps is via a wire to an earthing electrode. High current creates near zero voltage. 20,000 amps times a near zero voltage is near zero energy. Nothing damaged.

Lightning seeks earth ground. A lightning strike to utility wires far down the street is a direct strike, incoming to every household appliance, destructively to earth. Appliances are not a good conductor. So lightning creates a high voltage. Lightning current times a high voltage is high energy. Appliances damaged.

For over 100 years, facilities that cannot have damage installed superior earthing connected low impedance (ie 'less than 10 feet') via one 'whole house' protector. Then high current creates near zero voltage. 20,000 amps times a near zero voltage is near zero energy. No appliance is damaged.

Protection of a building is a lightning rod connected to 'earth'. Protection of appliances inside the building is lightning connected to 'earth'.

Some facilities have no protectors. But still have what provides that protection - single point earth ground. Protectors never do protection. Either a protector is a connecting device to earth (just like a wire). Or that protector only claims protection from another type of transient that is typically not destructive. Two completely different devices share a common name.

Critical is that low impedance connection. It must be short (ie 'less than 10 feet'). Wire must not have sharp bends, no splices, not inside metallic conduit, and must connect to 'single point earth ground'. All four words have electrical significance. And further explain why wall receptacle safety grounds are not earth grounds.

More responsible companies provide these superior solutions including Intermatic, Siemens, Ditek, General Electric, Square D, Syscom, Polyphaser, ABB, and Leviton. A Cutler-Hammer solution had even sold in Lowes and Home Depot for less than $50. Price does not determine quality. Some of the least 'quality' protectors sold for $80 and $120. Quality of protection is defined what something far more important - single point earth ground.

Also important in every useful answer are numbers. Lightning is typically 20,000 amps. A protector must not fail even from a direct lightning strike. Because the primary purpose of a protector is protection even from direct strikes. So a minimally sized 'whole house' protector starts at 50,000 amps. So that nobody even knew a surge existed. So that even a protector remains functional.

More numbers. A destructive surge is maybe hundreds of thousands of joules. How many joules does an appliance adjacent protector absorb? Hundreds? Thousands. Near zero protection. Effective protection means hundreds of thousands of joules dissipate harmlessly outside in earth. So that nobody even knew a surge existed.

Two completely different devices are discussed. Protectors that have no earth ground. And will somehow magically make that energy disappear. Or another completely different device that unfortunately shares a same name. The 'whole house' protector to protect everything for about $1 per protected appliance. Earth ground is where more of your money and most of your attention should focus. A protector is only as effective as its earth ground.

Collapse -
And -> Made in the USA <-
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / July 10, 2013 11:42 AM PDT
Collapse -
High quality surge protector advice needed
by C-Little / July 10, 2013 3:33 PM PDT

Appreciate the reply, but article does not mention anywhere about specific surge protectors Joules ratings, model numbers, etc..

It is merely an article about a company that "on-shored" operations as many corporations have done in recent years. Multiple corporations have on-shored operations for reasons of quality control, increasing labor costs overseas, theft of proprietary information, as well as increased shipping costs from foreign countries.

There are multiple corporations that have on-shored operations due to increased shipping costs across the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. One of the reasons why is due to petroleum prices rising thereby resulting in a corresponding increase in shipping costs, as well as for supply chain management purposes. What several large corporations who have on-shored jobs plan on doing is only leaving manufacturing operations in Asia for sales to their Asian customers.

Again what I am sincerely seeking is advice from those who can provide recommendations as far as quality, total surge protection, regarding high quality surge protector manufacturers. If so please reply.

Collapse -
Stop thinking like a corporate drone for five seconds
by Pepe7 / July 11, 2013 12:45 AM PDT

I suggest you take off the blinders and re-read what w-tom posted above. This will shed some light on why your line of reasoning is not correct. You need a different level of protection than your current understanding of the topic has grasped thus far. Surge protectors won't solve your issue.

(And to be honest, a conversation with a simple electrician would likely be more fruitful than asking at a very general forum such as these on CNET.)

And as an aside, why don't you have a cellular internet plan (e.g. tethering) as a backup for when your broadband goes down(?) All of my high powered corporate-type friends have that in place for when their infrastructure craps out a couple times per year (LOL).

Collapse -
Refrain from your personal attacks
by C-Little / July 11, 2013 1:43 AM PDT

I do have a cellular plan. However my computer needs are obviously different than yours. They are not needed for e-mail purposes, but rather online trading purposes where stock positions need to be taken rapidly.

Additionally, I did consult a certified electrician whom was an electrical contractor and of little use. For example he had never even heard of a whole house surge protector, but rather recommended going to Home Depot and buying power strips.

Collapse -
Relevant Electrical Concepts
by w_tom / July 11, 2013 2:04 AM PDT

Electricians are taught about human safety. You are not asking about human safety. You are asking about transistor safety. That involves electrical concepts rarely taught to electricians.

For example, what defines low impedance? Electricians are taught about things related to resistance (ie wire thickness). You are asking about a completely different concept involving impedance (ie wire length).

In any factility that cannot have damage, earthing of a 'whole house' protector is routine. Your telco's $multi-million switching computer (in a CO) connects to wires exposed all over town. It suffers about 100 surges per storm. How often is your town without phone service for four day? Never? Exactly. Because they do not use protectors you are discussing. Instead they use a 'whole house' solution. And, more important, upgrade what defines all protection. Single point earth ground. An 'art' that should be most of your questions.

A typical homeowner might suffer a potentially destructive surge once every seven years. However, a least expensive solution is also the only one routinely used in every telco CO. Those are obtained from the many more responsible manufacturers. And is the best answer for your questions.

Ignore joules. Those are protectors from transients that typically do no damage. The relevant parameter is amperes. A mimimally sized 'whole house' protector must connect 50,000 amps harmlessly to earth - and not fail. Those provided by 'more responsible' manufacturers. Typically costs about $1 per protected appliance.

True for all protectors. And not always understood by electricians. A protector is only as effective as its earth ground.

Collapse -
A real electrician understands all of it though
by Pepe7 / July 11, 2013 2:52 AM PDT

Sorry, but if you don't have someone at that level in your home, I would find someone else who's worth the money. Been there, done that.

Collapse -
Thanks Tom
by C-Little / July 11, 2013 3:07 AM PDT

Tom, thank you for your reply.

The reason I contacted a certified electrician back in June who is an electrical contractor, is in early 2013 the television show "This Old House" mentioned about whole house surge protectors. If I recall the episode was called the "Cambridge Project".

What I was doing was hoping to attain their professional opinion as well as get an estimate of having a whole house surge protector installed. The electrician did not even give me an estimate for a whole house which I really wanted installed, but instead told me to buy power strips.

Now everyone knows why I am asking about surge protectors, because if I go that route I want high quality to protect thousands of dollars of electrical items and computers.


__________________________________


As far as your comment about telephone lines my experience was different. One of the house phones is a landline for local and emergency calls. The power surge I mentioned above on this thread that melted the wiring in my neighbors house, as well as fried the modem in my wireless gateway .... also knocked my telephone service out for over 2 weeks until AT&T finally figured out the problem after 3 service calls..

What happened is the filters on the phone line where it enters my house got blown. You know the phone box on the side of houses where the interior lines connect to the exterior lines ... all the filters inside that box were blown according to AT&T.

It was a major power surge caused by our electrical company when they restored power after an ice storm that damaged dozens of homes.

Collapse -
I would fire that electrician since...
by Pepe7 / July 11, 2013 2:51 AM PDT

he doesn't know the very basics, nor understands how to employ a solution which would make him money, and save you money.

FWIW, I have a couple clients who trade for a living as well. Once I demonstrated that it might actually be worthwhile to spend some money upgrading their home networks/AV systems, they figured out that the money they spent would ultimately amount to more time with the kids/more time to make money, instead of having to call Comcast or ATT for the umpteenth time ;).

Collapse -
Remember we all come from diverse backgrounds
by C-Little / July 11, 2013 3:20 AM PDT

Pepe, we all come from diverse backgrounds. Thus the purpose of a forum such as CNET to assist others.

As far as your comment "he doesn't know the very basics, nor understands how to employ a solution which would make him money, and save you money". If you lost any money at all in your 401(k), IRA, brokerage accounts, etc. during the financial abyss of 2008 - 2009 then I could same thing about you. It was widely known in the financial community by early July 2008, the next shoe was going to drop and send markets plunging.
I do appreciate your other replies though.

Collapse -
Forgot to add one link
by Pepe7 / July 11, 2013 12:53 AM PDT
Collapse -
Appreciate the reply
by C-Little / July 11, 2013 2:14 AM PDT
In reply to: Forgot to add one link

Pepe, thank you for your reply!

I had actually recorded on DVR an episode of the television show "This Old House" from early 2013, where they were either showing or talking about whole house surge protectors. Unfortunately, that episode was deleted from the DVR by one of my children and I haven't had time to search past episodes of the show online. If I recall the episode I saw earlier this year never mentioned a specific brand or brands they recommended.

I sincerely appreciate your reply and will definitely read the full article you posted. Once again thank you for your help.

Popular Forums
icon
Computer Help 47,885 discussions
icon
Computer Newbies 10,322 discussions
icon
iPhones, iPods, & iPads 3,188 discussions
icon
Security 30,333 discussions
icon
TVs & Home Theaters 20,177 discussions
icon
HDTV Picture Setting 1,932 discussions
icon
Phones 15,713 discussions
icon
Windows 7 6,210 discussions
icon
Networking & Wireless 14,510 discussions

Tech for the school year

Smart tech for smart students

Forget the pencils and notebooks. Gear up your students with these portable and powerful note-taking machines.