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Hidden Partition - How to Find and Delete it

by Gatta / January 29, 2007 7:17 PM PST

Hidden Partition - How to Find and Delete it
================================

A got a new HP d290 model computer, which came with Free DOS O/S (that is without the Windows XP
operating system.

It has a Samsung brand 80 GB HD. However on partitioning and formating this HD (using Win 98 / SE,
FDISK.Exe file), the total space available is only 78,109,888 bytes (split in to 3 parts).

On another computer, made by a different company and with almost similar configuration, I have a Maxtor
brand 80 GB HD and on partitioning and formatting, it had 80, 009, 888 bytes available (that is 1.9 GB more)
This HD also has 3 partitions


It seems the HP's Samsung HD has a hidden partition. I tried to find it with FDSIK.EXE and also with
Partition Magic (version 8.2) and Partition Manager (version 5.5), but was unsuccessful.


Is there any other Partition related software, which can show a hidden partition and also be able
to delete the same (without damaging the C~ partition). ?


Any help or pointers on this subject will be much appreciated


Thanks


Frank Gatta

Jan 30, 2007

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With many computers, the hidden partition
by glb613 / January 29, 2007 9:29 PM PST

includes the recovery utility that allows you to reinstall the operating system, drivers and factory installed software. I'd advise leaving it alone.

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Even "worse"
by drat_ninny / January 29, 2007 10:54 PM PST

I don't know if this is still being done, but for many years Compaq systems had the BIOS configuration program stored on a hidden partition instead of in a silicon chip. I made the mistake of deleting that once, and never was able to get back into the BIOS configuration.

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Nope
by william551 / January 30, 2007 12:15 PM PST
In reply to: Even "worse"

I re-installed everything on my dad's computer and he has a new compaq. Nothing happened to the bios.

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If FDISK can't 'see' the partition...
by Edward ODaniel / January 30, 2007 10:22 AM PST
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Just FYI,
by whizkid454 / January 30, 2007 10:30 AM PST

78,109,888 bytes is 78.1 MB not GB. 1 million bytes is a MB and 1 billion bytes is a GB. It is also very normal for drives not to have the entire advertised capacity. It is always less, usually around 5-8% of the advertised space if no OS is installed. It is probably 13-18% with Win XP installed. I would assume Win 98 takes up a lot less room than does XP. Ex) 250GB drive will give you about 235GB of actual storage space, that's even without an OS isntalled on it. My primary 80GB hard drive w/ Win XP had about 65GB available.

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