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Google Chrome vs Windows Vista & 7

by RangerBob72 / March 1, 2012 4:15 AM PST

I am new at this, so bear with me. I am trying to decide if I should change over to Google Chrome. I currently have two laptops. One is an HP with Windows Vista and the other is a Dell with Windows 7. On several sites I visit, they recommend using Google Chrome if I have trouble with things like streaming video. What, if any, is the benefit of changing over to Chrome? If I decide to go that route, what problems would I run into changing over, and should I remove Vista and 7 from my system once the changover is complete? Also, is this something I should do myself, or should have someone with more knowledge do the work?

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All Answers

Best Answer as chosen by RangerBob72

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Google chrome is both an
by orlbuckeye / March 1, 2012 10:27 PM PST

OS and a Browser that run's in Windows OS's. The Chrome OS is processor specific on chrome laptop devices. Using Windows either windows 7 or Vista you can run many different browsers. Typically flash may be needed to run some streaming video. I have multiple browsers installed (IE, Chrome, Safari and Opera). Sometimes when I watch some videos i will get a message that the video will work better with Chrome so I just start Chorme up and watch it in Chrome. I prefer IE but have used all the others at times.

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Thanks for your help
by RangerBob72 / March 1, 2012 11:23 PM PST

Thanks everyone for all the great advice you have provided. It really gives me a better understanding of what Chrome is and how it works. It also helps me decide what I am going to do, which is to cover my head and stay in bed for the next few years. Only kidding, you understand. Actually, after reading everyone's advice, I think I will try Chrome and see if it is worth all the effort. For someone who is 70 years-old, which I am, I can say with pride that I remember when a computer was an old stubby pencil with teeth marks everywhere, and an eraser that looked as if it had been chewed on once too often. Now that's old. Anyway, thanks for everyone's help.

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Answer
I didn't change. I installed it and use both.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / March 1, 2012 4:22 AM PST

What's this changeover you are writing about?

Here I can launch and use either browser and even have both running at the same time.
Bob

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Answer
Google Chrome Is A Browser,Like Internet Explorer Or Firefox
by Grif Thomas Forum moderator / March 1, 2012 5:08 AM PST

Windows Vista and Windows 7 are operating systems and an operating system MUST be installed on the hard drive for ANY internet browser will work Installing any browser is separate and apart from the operating system that is installed on the computer, except to say that the browser does need to be compatible with the OS.. Google Chrome is compatible with both of the system you currently have..

Because Google Chrome is free and it can be downloaded at the website below, you can easily install it on either, or both of your computers, and give it a try at surfing the internet. It's something you can do. You can also make a decision as to whether you like Chrome as an internet browser, or whether you prefer something.

http://download.cnet.com/Google-Chrome/3000-2356_4-10881381.html

Hope this helps.

Grif

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Answer
Since
by mchainmchain / March 1, 2012 6:07 AM PST

Google Chrome is a browser (surf the internet), it can be used along with Internet Explorer, which is also a browser.

No need to uninstall Vista or Win7 to install Chrome.

In fact, if you try to uninstall Vista or Win7, you will find it is not possible to uninstall either. If it were possible, you would wind up with a computer that would be a very expensive doorstop or paperweight. You would turn it on, and nothing would happen. Also, keep in mind all your files you have that are important to you would be lost.

I'm thinking you only have Internet Explorer as an Internet browser.

Here are two internet browsers you can download and use that are "safer" to use than Internet Explorer:

http://www.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/fx/

http://www.opera.com/download/

Google Chrome download link: https://www.google.com/chrome/index.html

Just be sure to untick "Make Google Chrome my default browser" if you want Internet Explorer to open all web pages as it does now, when the installation and download begins. The same is true for any browser installation. All of them offer the option of making them the default browser when installed.

You can only run one browser as the default browser.

If you leave Internet Explorer as the default, then Internet Explorer will open web pages and web-based help pages as it always has. If you make Google Chrome your default, then Chrome will open all web pages automatically when you, say, go for web-based help in a program instead of IE.

Irregardless of which browser you choose as default, both will run (and can run at the same time) when you double-click the browser icon.

Hope this helps.

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You cannot
by mchainmchain / March 1, 2012 6:19 AM PST
In reply to: Since

Uninstall Internet Explorer. If you could, you would wind up with broken system.

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Thank for all the help
by RangerBob72 / March 1, 2012 5:13 PM PST
In reply to: You cannot

Thanks for all the great help. I think I understand what everyone is saying. When I posted my question, I should have said I was already running IE9 on both systems. I know enough, or at least I think I do, not to attempt to remove Vista or 7. It was IE9 I needed the info on. Now, if I understand everyone correctly, I can download Chrome and still keep IE9, just be sure to make Chrome my default browser. This brings up one other question. If I keep IE9, will it use up space, or do I need not worry about that?

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Re: space used by IE
by Kees_B Forum moderator / March 1, 2012 5:42 PM PST
In reply to: Thank for all the help

My Program Files\Internet Explorer folder is 5.00 MB. My total hard disk space is some 800 GB, that's 800,000 MB. So I don't see any need to worry about the space used by Internet Explorer.
Moreover, I must use Internet Explorer to visit Windows Update (can't do that in IE or Chrome).

So I don't delete that folder.

Kees

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Windows purchased in the US
by orlbuckeye / March 1, 2012 10:30 PM PST
In reply to: Thank for all the help

comes with IE and if you uninstall it you could see problems. They have come out with a windows versions where IE isn't integrated in the OS in Europe.

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