Browsers, E-mail, & Web Apps forum

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firefox and thunderbird

by vhummel / May 15, 2005 2:12 AM PDT

I am currently using IE & Outlook express. I would like to download Firefox & Thunderbird and try them out. My question is, can I download these two and use them for a trial without uninstallling IE & OE and without messing anything up with my original configuration.
Pls advise

Virgil Hummel

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These programs are without cost to you
by Steven Haninger / May 15, 2005 2:44 AM PDT

and they don't nag for donations either. I use both and find them to be quite adequate. You can install a mail icon in your Firefox toolbar and jump in and out of it while browsing. Firefox is, for me, quite stable and renders the great majority of web pages well. These programs are small to download and will import settings and bookmarks from many other programs to make using them instantly a breeze. There is no trial period. You can install and keep them or remove them at your own will.

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Yes!
by denjones / May 15, 2005 4:02 AM PDT

If your question revolved around using both on the same system, the answer is "yes". I almost exclusively use Firefox and Thunderbird but today I had to use IE because I had to update my daughter's FAFSA for student loans and they will not accept Firefox.

I like Firefox and Thunderbird better but there are times when you'll need IE.

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FAFSA now accepts firefox! 3.5.x and 3.6.x, of course
by erandalln / August 14, 2011 9:27 AM PDT
In reply to: Yes!

6 years later and the issues are almost the same: I have to use IE because I have FF 5.0.1 and don't know of a way of emulating--'trick' FAFSA into thinking I have--FF 3.6.x.

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Sure, give them chance
by zmark / May 15, 2005 4:29 AM PDT

I switched to using firefox and thunderbird. They both are very adequate programs. I prefer Thunderbird over Outlook Express. You will find that Thunderbird will take a little longer to open than OE.
If you decide to give Thunderbird a try, during the installation process you'll have a window pop up asking if you want to import settings and such from Outlook Express.....With my initial experience with Thunderbird, I clicked on the option to do just that, but it didn't work properly. So I uninstalled, then reinstalled and this time around I checked off to manually import contacts, mail, settings, etc..... This worked out better (for me) *Using WindowsME*

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A feature thing
by bclinger / May 15, 2005 5:29 AM PDT

If you want to have the same basic email in both setups, then make sure that the "delete from server" option is not marked - if it is, when one checks your email, it'll be removed from the server, hence, the other program will not be able to retrieve it.

Ben

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