E-readers forum

Question

eBooks > paper books

by samisgray / August 10, 2011 2:30 PM PDT

Are ebooks replacing paper books?? I'm worried that in the future, printing companies will go out of business and our world will turn into full-ebook-technology...

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All Answers

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Answer
So far no.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / August 11, 2011 2:01 AM PDT
In reply to: eBooks > paper books

What some folk are thinking that paper books will go the way of the Audio CD business. So far I just see a change in medium.

Since you don't have to get a publisher to agree to print your book, you'll see more choices in ebooks and we'll still have paper for some time to come.
Bob

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Answer
ebooks
by redwillie97 / August 13, 2011 12:43 AM PDT
In reply to: eBooks > paper books

Despite being less expensive, less wasteful and more convenient..I don't believe ebooks and digital downloads will ever cause printing to entirely go out of style.
Just imagine how crippled we would be if there were some kind of war or disaster that destroyed our power grid?. We always need to be prepared for anything and would be total idiots to put all our eggs in one basket..

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what a relief
by ayresanna / August 16, 2011 4:55 PM PDT
In reply to: ebooks

I'm glad that books won't go out of print... even the sound of it sounds insane.
I really do love paper books but the thought of being able to carry all my favorites and not have to ponder over which to pack by just taking one eReader is quite tempting too

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Answer
ebooks - paper book & ebooks site.
by rahulrdesire / August 20, 2011 5:41 PM PDT
In reply to: eBooks > paper books

well you are right ebooks are growing so fast but. ebook never can take book. but ebooks are good way students and other can find ebook at free on internet . all kinds of books. which is impossible to find in a very big library.

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Answer
Dedicated reader
by mjd420nova / September 2, 2011 9:31 AM PDT
In reply to: eBooks > paper books

I read an average of a book a week, averaging around 400 to 500 pages each. I will not and refuse to consider an E-book. I know I'm not alone in this but have no real take on how others feel. I know I can't swap books with friends and like the looks of a full bookcase. Hardbound books get one of my custom identity labels and I ask all who borrow them to sign their name on the inside cover below the label. True, an E-book will never suffer from turned over corners or ragged covers from being shoved in a back pocket but even at a flea market they can get at least 25 cents regardless of the condition. I find many older paperbacks and hardbounds at flea markets and even have a HPB(half price books) outlet nearby. I can not imagine taking a half hour lunch break and find my readers battery dead. If I take a book on the plane and leave it in the pocket when I leave, no serious loss but an e reader, I'd be pretty upset. Just what I need is another device that is fragile and subject to being ripped off if left unattended.

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eBook Readers
by Monte521 / September 2, 2011 12:20 PM PDT
In reply to: Dedicated reader

1. You do not have to worry about the battery going dead. I have a Kindle, the battery goes for months on a charge. The reader gives you plenty of warning when it is low. I can charge mine from my office computer, my car, at home or from a back-up battery.

2. I live in a small town, hundreds of miles from the nearest large book store, but I can find books on Amazon at any time that I have a Wi-Fi connection.

3. The Kindle is not fragile (of course I have not tested the limits) and the screen is not easily damaged. Adding a good cover makes it more robust.

Having said that, current eReaders do not really work for books that depend heavily on graphics, photos, maps, etc.

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Future proof
by DOSpower / September 2, 2011 2:50 PM PDT
In reply to: eBook Readers

The battery on a book never went flat, if you lose a book it is much less costly than losing an eReader and a book printed 200+ years ago can still be read today and those of today will be able to be read 200 years from now. I know computing formats from 20 years ago that are no longer compatible with current software/hardware. eReaders have a place in the market but hard copy books will be around for some time to come.

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Answer
Buy the hardback and get the eBook also!
by bentsn / September 4, 2011 5:53 AM PDT
In reply to: eBooks > paper books

eBooks are a good replacement for paperback fiction, but I read mostly non-fiction that I want to be able share my books and come back to them. Despite the promises of the BN and Amazon, eBooks with DRM are fundamentally transient.

I like to convenience of eBooks for reading during my commute by bus and subway, but also want to have the paper book. With current pricing I would have to but the same book twice to get both.

The publishers should provide the option buying the hardback and getting the eBook for free or at most $1 extra.

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Answer
follow the money
by gnw_iii / September 29, 2011 10:04 PM PDT
In reply to: eBooks > paper books

Many libraries, like the rest of us, are under budget pressure. There are big expenses with maintaining print collections -- shelf space requires climate control, staff to shelve materials, etc., so it is inevitable that libraries will be cutting back on printed material and increasing reliance on ebooks. In developing areas where there have been no libraries, ebooks may make it possible to provide well-stocked libraries with minimal investment in physical facilities.

Many publishing companies are struggling with the increased costs of distribution for printed material, so their survival may depend on how well they do ebooks. There are still a number of issues to be resolved. Will
ebooks be sold or rented under some per-use model? if your ebook reader is stolen or breaks, can you recover your ebooks to a replacement device? How can you provide high quality color illustrations? Perhaps we will see paper publications that provide only the illustrations, meant to be used together with an ebook reader for the text content which would be enabled by scanning a code on the printed section.

It is a not question of replacing print -- economics say ebooks are here to stay -- but the form and mechanisms of future ebooks are not yet decided. You can sure that publishers are working to find ways (changes to copyright law, readers that are locked into one service, etc.) to improve profitability. Who is looking after the interests of the readers?

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Answer
Lending
by chudarchur / October 2, 2011 9:30 AM PDT
In reply to: eBooks > paper books

Does this mean no more lending or buying used books also. Everyone has to buy?

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