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E Reader Downloads Overseas?

by umanemo / January 22, 2012 1:33 AM PST

I travel extensively throughout Europe in a RV as a full time lifestyle. My wife reads books as her common passtime and has collected and trades dozens of books and has dozens constantly on hand - a storage problem in our abbreviated living space. She needs one of these devices.

We are US citizens and have library access in our former community. We are also on a limited fixed income budget (read: CHEAP) and would like to download as many as possible of the available titles that are free.

Therein may lie the glitch to our hopeful solution to the book storage problem.

From Overseas can we download everything or anything? I.E. Library downloads, Lend-to-read books from family, Retail downloads, etc. I have heard that this is a problem as the servers recognize your location and block downloads under the copyright acts of that country or the EU zone?

Has anyone had any luck with family or friends downloading titles to PC (in the USA) and forwarding those title files to a computer overseas for a USB transfer to a E Reader device??? This seems a viable solution to circumvent the overseas conventions.

What device brands will be most open to all formats that offer free reading material?

OK. So many questions and so little knowledge! Thank you for everyone's help.

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We can't discuss how to get around that in these forums.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / January 22, 2012 1:47 AM PST

But yes, it can and does happen. Due to the rules we can't discuss getting around the restrictions.

For example, if you are the author of some content and have agreements in the USA and was working on agreements in another country, you would be upset if I wrote how to get around that.

So the answer is yes it can happen. But this is not the forum to discuss how to get around legal restrictions.
Bob

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Download fidelity Overseas?
by umanemo / January 22, 2012 4:29 AM PST

Sorry to have been so unclear of my intentions and I made no suggestion of "Hacking" copyrighted material, it is just that material that is supposed to be in the public domain anyway that I wish to access, only those titles that fall within the agreements that were made within US conventions allowing unrestricted lending.

Could those titles such as those opened under Project Gutenberg, American Library's etc., in public copyright free domain be transfered to a overseas eReader using the method I have outlined?

All of that slide-of-hand aside, are there any proven methods to access ILL Inter Library Lending titles through overseas servers?

All of these access issues are certainly a game changer for those of us ex-pats working or residing in a foreigh country.

Thank you for your creative commons diligence.

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Again it depends.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / January 22, 2012 4:44 AM PST

And for example some countries (five letters, begins with C) block such in spite of that. You don't want to be found breaking their laws.

As to access from overseas, if it works, you're done. If not you email the support staff and ask how to make it work. Again, creative commons or not, we abide by the laws of the country we are in or if we don't we take the responsibility of our actions.

Check the forum policies here and you see we get to abide by the laws and such. We can't discuss how to get around the Great (fire)Wall of C____.
Bob

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I've been overseas
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / January 23, 2012 1:42 AM PST
In reply to: Again it depends.

And so far it works here and not there (that place with the great firewall.)

I would not press my luck there and try to get around it as I do want to leave such a place without trouble.

It sounds like you want to discuss getting around the issue which can't happen here. I hope you can reveal what country and maybe someone has been there.
Bob

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Nod to the Sony over Kindle overseas.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / January 26, 2012 1:57 AM PST
In reply to: Again it depends.

Unless we are talking about the Kindle Fire, I think the Sony has the edge. But on the Fire we have other options such as "rooting" to relax some curbs.
Bob

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Some content will be no problem at all
by Pepe7 / January 25, 2012 10:59 PM PST

E.g. project gutenburg and the like. That's free for you to access as you see fit within the guidelines posted on that site. Ditto for American libraries. Each may have individual policies regarding their borrowing privileges, separate from the overall copyright statute.

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When in Rome.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / January 26, 2012 1:35 AM PST
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LICRA_v._Yahoo!

There are numerous legal articles about this. If you were to use a VPN to get content that was blocked, there are laws you could be breaking in that country.

Be sure you do this knowing that your US rights won't help you.
Bob
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Downloading eReader material Overseas
by umanemo / January 23, 2012 1:39 AM PST

Anyway, staying within forum "Policy" and "Rules" so we can move on with the subject of this post;

1. "We are US citizens and have library access in our former community. We are also on a limited fixed income budget (read: CHEAP) and would like to download as many as possible of the available titles that are free. Therein may lie the glitch to our hopeful solution to the book storage problem."

2. "From Overseas can we download everything or anything? I.E. Library downloads, Lend-to-read books from family, Retail downloads, etc. I have heard that this is a problem as the servers recognize your location and block downloads under the copyright acts of that country or the EU zone?"

3. "What device brands will be most open to all formats that offer free reading material? OK. So many questions and so little knowledge! Thank you for everyone's help."

Sorry Bob, I thank you for your insite and I do not wish to be so redundant, but I really need to get back on track with this post and solicit more relevant replies from anyone who has had experience downloading overseas.

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Answers
by Pepe7 / January 25, 2012 11:13 PM PST

In addition to my reply above:

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Sony vs. Kindle for Overseas Downloads?
by umanemo / January 26, 2012 1:44 AM PST
In reply to: Answers

Pepe,

Thank you for such a plethora of pertinent information. All of your resources have led me to many of the answers I am seeking! I do appreciate your ability to stay on subject and your attention to my true intentions.

The only litmus test remains in the actual use of the eReader overseas and I therefore remain on the forum in hopes that I may hear from anyone having actually downloaded within the EU in recent months. And I am particularly focused on the no cost options as I have outlined above. (all leagal access only)

Thank you again Pepe!

P.S. I was considering the Sony for it's format universality but have a special interest in the audio books capability of the Kindle for entertainment while driving... but there are always trade offs! If the Kindle (also using Calibre) downloads everything I am looking for through the EU servers then that's the eReader for my ALL needs.

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E Reader downloads overseas
by MVMia / February 3, 2012 12:08 PM PST

I have downloaded e-books both to my computer and Kindle from Europe and India and library materials from our university library via vpn. All perfectly legal. The few times when I was having problems with the Kindle download, I downloaded the book on the computer and then transferred it with the usb cable (the Kindle appears as an external drive on the computer and you just drag it). Again, all completely legal.

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Project Gutenberg in Europe/kindle e-book sharing group
by gnasher / February 4, 2012 11:09 PM PST

I can't help with the library issue, but I live in Europe and I have a kindle e-reader. I have downloaded quite a few free books (eg Henry James, George Eliot, Scott Fitzgerald, Trolloppe) that are out of copyright from Project Gutenberg. You just download them to your computer and transfer them via cable or wi-fi to your e-reader. When connected by cable it appears as a drive, as someone else has said. The whole point about Project Gutenberg books is that there is no copyright issue, so nobody is being robbed if you download them or your friends do and then pass them on to you. Many PG books are in pdf format which all e-readers can use, but some are also in proprietary format as well. It is rare for these free books not to readable by any of the common e-readers on the market. So if you are only going to go for free books then your choice of e-reader is not a problem.

With kindle there is a system where up to six kindles can be linked as a group to share materials. So if you have a friend or relative back home who is a prolific buyer of books (I probably buy on average a book a week) they can share them with you provided you have registered both e-readers with Amazon as a shared account. Amazon stores anything you have bought with them so you can re-download it at any time (if you get a new kindle or delete it by mistake). If two devices are linked then the second one has access to all the books that the owner of the first one has bought and vice versa. All this is absolutely legal. It recognises the idea that friends and family share physical books, and so allows them to share e-books in the same way.

I also have a newspaper subscription. I have a kindle 3-G with built in internet access via mobile phone networks. I have downloaded my daily paper in Australia and Poland as well as the UK where I live. It would not download directly in Ukraine (presumably no deal between Amazon and local cellphone provider) so I downloaded via hotel wi-fi to my laptop then installed it with the cable.

The other thing worth looking out for is self-published e-books with no physical counterpart. They are often sold at around a dollar each. Some are rubbish, but some are suprisingly good value.

Happy reading!

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Successful eReader Downloads Overseas
by umanemo / February 6, 2012 2:51 AM PST

Thank you for getting right down to the facts and your first hand insight with the realities of downloading material overseas. Pepe, Mia and gnasher you have re-instilled my interest in technology. I now have confidence that the silicon and plastic reading device of my choice will not become a Frisbee of frustration upon my return to Europe!

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