TVs & Home Theaters forum

Question

DVR TV tuner with internal hard drive Blue Ray Write/player

by Daniel Law / January 8, 2012 1:07 AM PST

I'm tired of the old pay as you go/rental cable dvr. Want to purchase my own (non rental) DVR with built in TV tuner, large internal hard drive, BlueRay reader/writer, WiFi capable with HDMI ports, that is capable to record from multiple sources, such as Internet, RoKu, Hulu, cable provider, Amazon, Google, Netflix, etc., any available entertainment provider and be able to program to auto record my favorites when they air. Is such a modern product on the market? Or will I be required to just build my own from scratch?

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All Answers

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Answer
There are none.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / January 8, 2012 3:38 AM PST

The moment you wrote Hulu it died. Rather that write anymore, do you know why this is?

And did you find such a thing? (I didn't unless it was a PC)
Bob

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DVR TV tuner with internal hard drive Blue Ray Writer/player
by Daniel Law / January 8, 2012 5:02 AM PST
In reply to: There are none.

Hulu was a slight slip. I recently received a Roku for a gift and about a week ago registered with Hulu, but after playing with it a day or two, I've realized it won't work for my entertainment needs and will most likely terminate with them. My goal is to be able to record programming and burn DVD's of massive TV & movie content, my wife and I are planning to start cruising (sailboat) for about 6 months each winter and I'm trying to record a lot of tv/movies to watch when off the grid. So, have you seen anything (without Hulu) that will serve as a DVR, tv tuner, with internal hard drive and Blue Ray/DVD burner/writer? Without a VCR option included. I'd like to buy, but if no one is selling this, I'll have to plan on building my own this year. I'm very tired of renting a DVR from the cable company which has limited recording hard drive space and no disk burning options. In the last two years alone I could have bought all the parts to build my own DVR from what I've paid the cable company.

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DVR TV tuner with internal hard drive Blue Ray Write/player
by Daniel Law / January 8, 2012 5:08 AM PST
In reply to: There are none.

Besides Hulu which I most likely will terminate membership after this one week, have you seen any new DVR tuner with a writer/player? I've searched myself and haven't found anything that meets my requirements and just wanted to confirm before ordering components to build my own.

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There's also a big problem in that
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / January 8, 2012 5:24 AM PST

The industry does not want HD recording in an easy to use system. Just look around for a BD RECORDER and the offerings are rather bad.
Bob

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If you want to record HD. Names. Yes, NAMES.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / January 9, 2012 1:13 AM PST

BLACK MAGIC
HAUPPAUGE

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Yes, just build your own
by Pepe7 / January 9, 2012 1:11 AM PST

I suggest you start to peruse the HTPC related forums, as they are really helpful in learning all the current capabilities and what sort of roadblocks you may encounter when building such a device. It's unfortunately too detailed and unfortunately, not permitted here to go into much of the discussion regarding copyright related issues.

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Answer
I can't tell you much about Amazon and such, but...
by ahtoi / January 9, 2012 4:25 PM PST

I do have Netflix, and want you to forget about recording them (netflix streaming). It cannot be done unless you have the right recorder. They are copy protected.

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Answer
Here's the road block that I see
by Dan Filice / January 9, 2012 4:25 PM PST

So you don't want to rent an HD DVR from your cable provider? Thing is, that DVR comes with a tuner that's preprogrammed to record HD channels from the cable. Any other tuner will need access to this HD content, thus the cable company will need to allow access. Some time ago TVs had cable cards that allowed a TV to get access to programming with the blessing of the cable provider. Those didn't last too long. The best you might be able to do is add a tuner to a PC with software to allow recording of over-te-air channels, then that recorded data could be burned to a disc. OTA programming is free, so no road blocks. Programming like HBO, Smithsonian, Velocity, etc., will require a subscription fee to cable because it's not free. Even "free" basic cable channels like Discovery and HGTV will require a cable fee to get them in HD.

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