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Do you trust your computer repair shop?

by bruvensky / March 31, 2013 2:38 AM PDT

How safe is your data on your computer when you take it in for a repair? What can a person do? Should you remove the hard drive ahead of time, and if the hard drive is the problem then what? Is there a way to lock data securely? What do persons do in high security situations? Once when I took my computer in and offered my password, the owner of the shop said that he didn't need it as they had a program to go around it.

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Forgot to sign my name on my post.
by bruvensky / March 31, 2013 2:41 AM PDT

My name is Burt.

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Computer Repair.
by Dafydd Forum moderator / March 31, 2013 2:47 AM PDT

Basically, no no no. NTpassword will get around it. Your data is open to anybody in the shop.
If you remove the hard drive, how do you expect them to reatore your computer?


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Good question. No you should not.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / March 31, 2013 2:42 AM PDT

Why? Read Dr. Phil's Life Code. All explained there.

While most folk are friendly, caring and more, you don't know who will gain access to the computer so take whatever steps are needed to feel safe.

As to the password, NTPASSWD when it first came out was a lot of fun to demonstrate. That was about a decade ago and now there are quite a few more.

That password is pretty weak.

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by Dafydd Forum moderator / March 31, 2013 2:54 AM PDT

So Bob is NTPASSWD not the way these days?


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There is more than one way.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / March 31, 2013 8:56 AM PDT
In reply to: NTPASSWD
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My experience has been OK
by wpgwpg / March 31, 2013 2:53 AM PDT

I had a problem with overheating with a laptop while under extended warranty. I took it in and they fixed the problem and in the process restored it to factory settings. If you don't back your system up before taking it in for repairs, you're taking a risk of something like that happening. The repair did fix my problem though - I had a bad driver I never would've suspected. The laptop came back from the shop with no other adverse affects. It was repaired under an extended warranty I had with (the now defunct) Circuit City.

This is just one example of the many, many reasons folks need to always back up their systems.

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by itsdigger / March 31, 2013 3:01 AM PDT

since I'm the repair person with help from Bob Profitt and other C-net folks. Wink

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by Dafydd Forum moderator / March 31, 2013 3:07 AM PDT
In reply to: Absolutely

But we are talking shop repairs here.


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I have given this some thought and
by bruvensky / April 1, 2013 12:24 AM PDT

I think that one option would be to have a second hard drive with just Windows and a few files and programs on it. If I need to take my computer into a shop, then I can swap drives before I take it in and then replace the original one after the repair.

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