TVs & Home Theaters forum

General discussion

Do I really need a HDMI cable for my lcd tv?

by dohearne / March 21, 2006 11:37 PM PST

We just moved into a new house and had the family room wired
for home theater and Plasma/LCD tv. I believe the man who installed the wiring put in the three jack set up, along with another two jacks,
one red and one white along with a Video A? Jack. Well, we bought our LCD Tv yesterday (Sony Bravia 40") at Circuit City and the sales rep insisted that we need a HDMI cable. He was so emphatic about it, that
he said that anything said to the contrary by any installer was bull.
We don't have an HDMI cable installed. Do we really need it?

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Here is HDMI info and my personal opinion.
by Henry Hollander / March 22, 2006 12:11 AM PST

Copy&paste the following url to get the info on HDMI http://www.hometheaterhifi.com/volume_11_4/feature-dvi-hdmi-hdcp-connections-11-2004.html

I use it with my cable box and LG upscan DVD player, even though there are remote hacks for getting HD res through component on my LG. My reasoning is that it offers unsurpassed quality, lets me get video and audio through 1 cable, and is fully HDCP compliant.

I recommend HDMI, but I don't feel you have to buy Monster brand or other, in my opinion, overpriced ones like the $100 Belkin I saw at circuit city. I took the $50 a piece ones from my cable provider and I'm very happy with them, ymmv=your milage may vary.

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An opinion based on fact. . .
by Coryphaeus / March 22, 2006 12:45 AM PST

When I worked for The Great Indoors we sold the high end TVs. We used Direct TV HD receivers feeding the TVs. I tested the Toshiba 1080P, the Mitsu 1080P, and the Sony SXRD LCoS. I connected each to an HD receiver using the HDMI and the component inputs.

I couldn't tell any difference.

I have five HD TVs at home: three Westinghouse LCDs, a Philips LCD, and a Philips 55'' rear projection CRT. I feed all mine with the component inputs.

I've saved about four hundred dollars.

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H.D.M.I. MADE A HUGE DIFFERENCE IN PICTURE QUALITY
by stewart norrie / March 22, 2006 1:10 AM PST

The picture quality of my d.v.d. player and dish 811 sat system was very poor until I replaced all the componit vidio cables to d.v.i. set up. So my set up is d.v.i. output from my dish, and d.v.d. player to the t.v. set with 2 d.v.i. to h.d.m.i. adapters This is because I run my audio to my 5.1. amp with optical audio cables. In closing some folks say that a componit vidio set up works fine but for me there was a 50% improvement in picture quality have a nice day stewart

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Cables, Cables, Cables....
by kena10 / March 22, 2006 4:07 PM PST

Most people here are going to say "you don't need those expensive cables, ya-da ya-da ya-da ya-da..."

Here's the spin on cables... You've already spent some serious cash on that nice XBR. Do it a favor and feed it some good cables. If you have a very critical eye, you will see a difference in the picture quality, or sound when you put money into cables. I know that spending 100-150 on a single cable seems like a waste of money but, if you want to make sure you are getting your money's worth, then buy a set of Monster Cables and a cheap set of cables and try them out. If you decide that you can't tell the difference, then simply return the expensive cables. If you do happen to see a difference, then you can take back the cheap cables and become hooked.

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HDMI cable for my lcd tv?
by jcrobso / March 23, 2006 1:17 AM PST

Or component cables, are needed. You didn't say what your sources are?? DVD, cable, etc. Do any of them have a HDMI output jack???? If not HDMI output jack then you can't use a HDMI cable.
To get any HD you will have to use component or HDMI.
Do you have an antenna hookup to get OTA HD? John

http://www.ramelectronics.net/html/hdtv-cables.html

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May also depend on your TV connections
by Dan Filice / March 23, 2006 1:37 AM PST

Check your inputs on your TV to see if you have multiple component inputs, and if so, you my 2-cents is that you can enjoy an excellent picture. But, it you have limited inputs, then you may need to consider the HDMI. I have a Sony LCD 23" that only has one set of component inputs and one HDMI input. My cable box has HDMI but the cable company said it doesn't yet support it, so I have my HD cable box connected via component. So far so good, except that I want my DVD player to be hooked up also via component. I can't because that input is already used. I wish my cable box had usable HDMI so I could free up the component connections for my DVD player.

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Too Few Component Connections
by digitalgirlnyc / March 23, 2006 5:46 AM PST

Dan, We solved the problem of having two few connections for our system configuration at my house by using spliter cables (go to Radio Shack). Of course the purists might have something to say about signal noise or something like that (I'm just speculating here), but uyou will be able to hook up both your Cable Box and your DVD player via component connection. I hope this helps you out. And on the subject of cheap v. expensive cables, I live with a very picky Musician (with a an incredible ear and eye) and he thinks the expensive cables are a waste of money. He says it is the same cooper wire just encased in a fancier wrapper.

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I don't think so.......
by kena10 / March 23, 2006 3:03 PM PST

Dan,

The tv in question (Sony KDL-V40XBR1) has 7 inputs, plenty for anything you want to hook up to this thing, inlcuding 3 Component Video inputs on video sources 2, 4 and 5.

As they say, opinions are like a-holes (not trying to offend anyone, so don't overreact), everyone's got one. As I mentioned earlier, he should get a set of expensive cables and a set of cheap ones and find out for himself.

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Reply to "I don't think so. . . . "
by digitalgirlnyc / March 24, 2006 12:31 AM PST

Not offended, sure the scientific method is always a good way to go. I did realize after I posted my message that Dan wants to know about HDMI, which is a type of port/connector as opposed to a quality level of cable and since I don't know anything about that type of connector, I defer to those more knowledgeable than I.

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Correction
by digitalgirlnyc / March 24, 2006 12:32 AM PST

It wasn't Dan that wanted to know about HDMI, that was in the original post in the string. Sorry!

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HDMI vs Component cables
by WellActually / March 23, 2006 9:07 AM PST

Recently purchased my first big screen samsung dlpHD tv I originally hooked it up using a DVI cable from the HD box to a HDMI to the tv. Was not impressed with the picture quality at all. However, about a week later I had the samsung tech over to fix a problem with the remote and while he was there I asked him about the best setup. He suggested a component cable from the box to the tv. We switched the cables around and I can't say I've seen a better picture on any tv. Go figure. Needless to say I returned the 100.00 monster cable.

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Paul I GUESS WE WILL NEVER KNOW
by stewart norrie / March 23, 2006 10:42 AM PST

This componit cable vs d.v.i. question comes up all the time, You installed componit vidio cables and saw an improvement in picture quality. I had a nasty picture using componit cables and switched to a d.v.i. set up and the picture quality improved at least 40% This was also true with my d.v.d. player I had to buy a denon with d.v.i. output and gave away my old denon that had only componit vidio out because the picture quality was terrible I guess we will never know why have a nice day stewart

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TOO MUCH HDMI HYPE
by BONSPEED / March 23, 2006 10:55 AM PST

the question of whether or not hdmi cables are better often depends on who you ask. the only thing for certain is there is ''not'' a common opinion today regarding their performance. unless you have a 72'' screen (sterwart :)) that can show every imperfection, time would be better spend adjusting your hdtv settings properly. quality dvd players will generally be hdmi capable, but they also come with better video chips. keep your focus on the main course (hdtv, dvd payer) rather then the side dish (cables).

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I agree to an extent...
by Henry Hollander / March 23, 2006 9:50 PM PST
In reply to: TOO MUCH HDMI HYPE

But I don't think HDMI is hype, it is a necessary element for the upcoming HD format. With component cables, you will be watching that H.264 1080p movie in standard def. As the link I provided points out, even some of the DVI interfaces out aren't HDCP compliant.

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