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Do I need a wireless signal extender?

by vBJunkie / January 22, 2008 9:32 AM PST

Hi, let me explain my situation first. I am managing a motel and we currently have a 256K DSL connection with a Linksys Wireless-N router. Some of our units can't recieve a strong signal while others can. I'm assuming it is because some users are using a b/g card and not an N. My question is, in the first unit where the signal cuts off, if I were to put a wireless extender in that unit, would it work then, or does it have to have a signal to begin with? The signal is on right outside the door but dies when I go inside.

Also, being that we only have a 256K DSL connection, is the wireless limited to that bandwidth also? Even if the router says speeds up to 54Mbps?

The property is fairly large and I would like to provide Wi-Fi for all the units without having to install an internet connection in other units.

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What many do is add another WAP.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / January 22, 2008 10:48 AM PST

If you get a WAP and place it even 20 feet on the other side of a wall, it usually helps. Extenders can be hit or miss.


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by vBJunkie / January 23, 2008 1:09 AM PST

An access point doesn't connect to another access point though does it?

I'm thinking about trying an extender and purchasing a new antenna for my Linksys router to see how that works out.

In order to add another WAP, do I need to sign up for internet service again or will it run off my current connection that my old WAP is using?

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Just sharing.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / January 23, 2008 1:15 AM PST
In reply to: Thanks

I'm sharing what I do. I add a WAP since I want more stability and distance. So the WAP plugs into one of the router's spare LAN ports and I'm done. I place it about 20 feet on the other side of the wall and that helps a lot. Try extenders but I've found them to be hit or miss so I prefer the solid solutions.


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I'll give it a try.
by vBJunkie / January 23, 2008 3:28 AM PST
In reply to: Just sharing.

I see, I will give the extender a shot first, then possibly the WAP.

thanks for your help.

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