Spyware, Viruses, & Security forum

General discussion

Cut through the crap...what do I REALLY need?

by Goddess_Susie / August 19, 2010 1:01 PM PDT

There are a bunch of recommendations and CNET has a security software "starter pack." However some of the things recommended are redundant. I just switched from AVG free to Avast free but what do I really need in addition? Do I need Spybot? Malwarebytes? I did add Last Pass but then saw the other program that does the same function (can't remember the name.) In a nutshell, what are the recommendations for what I need to cover myself all the way around?

Thanks for opinions...

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Need
by manmur / August 19, 2010 4:02 PM PDT

You need only one Firewall and one antivirus. you should have only one real time scanner for malware. However you can have as many of the on demand scanners that you want.

I do not recommend Spybot S+D anymore as it only update once a week. The way that new malware are coming out each minute.


On my own PC I use the Fallowing:

Antivirus: Avira Antivir Personal (Free ed.)

Firewall: Comodo Firewall (Free)

Note: It is part of the Comodo Internet security suite. However you are able to chose the parts you want to have.

Antimalware: Malwarebytes, Windows defender, Supperantispyware.



Others I found useful: Spywareblaster, a host file, and Web-of-trust (WOT) for my web browsers. I also use Sandboxie to run my main web browser in a 'sand box'. Also with Firefox I use NO-Script. I am using C-Cleaner to clean out all of my temp files and recycling bin out.

Make sure that you have windows update set for automatic.

What you use is up to you. Also do a mix and match to see what will work well together. Remember that you are your worst security treat. No security program can protect your PC from your self.

manmur

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Needs
by Phil Crase / August 20, 2010 10:23 PM PDT

Everyone has different opinions of AV software. Typically, one AV/ANTISpyware software and one firewall, typically. AVG is quite good, if you buy it in the box packaged with anti spyware, the free stuff is limiting, that is why it is free. Almost daily I see systems that are hosed because of free software use and more than half have been on questionable websites with insufficient security, Myspace, facebook and a few others seem to be creating lots of issues. More and more I find myself using Linux instead of Windows.

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Thanks...
by Goddess_Susie / August 20, 2010 11:43 PM PDT

I just switched from AVG free to Avast free. Would you recommend I get the new top of the line AVG? They have a deal with 2 years for the price of one right now.

Will it cover spyware, malware, and all of the normal worms, trojans, key loggers, etc.?

I am willing to spend the money- I just want my system protected and since there are so many options that are rated so well by CNet and Users both, it is difficult to know what to put on my Win XP system without loading a bunch of redundant programs. I haven't upgraded to Win 7 yet although I have the discs to do so.

So, in summary, am I correct that your opinion is that AVG top of the line will cover me 100% and I don't need any other ancillary software for security?

Last question...I saw that they have something for Education but I can't figure out if it is for the school or for students. They are closed so if you know the answer to this one, I'd appreciate it. If not, I'll call Monday when they are open.

Thanks so much for everyone's help and opinions. I just want the best coverage for all of our computers with the least number of programs. Happy

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No such thing as.....
by gargamel360 / August 21, 2010 3:51 AM PDT
In reply to: Thanks...

.....100% protection. Well, staying offline is 100%. But that is it.

You have done the reading by what you have posted, all that is left is to try on your system. Systems are like fingerprints, all unique, moreso the longer you run it w/o reformat. So only way to see if software works well, no conflicts/slowdowns, is to try it. This goes doubly so for security software.

I say "harden" your web browser of choice, browser exploit malware seems the fastest growing. I can do this with Firefox with add-ons like AdBlock Plus, RequestPolicy, WebOfTrust, and mainly NoScript. But most other browsers have good security options, baked-in or add-on(yes, even notorious I.E. can be safer).
Virtualization(sandboxing) is also a good option for any browser's security.

But NEVER trust a single program or suite as the "final word" in security. Layering multiple lines of defense is safest way to go.
Within reason. Too much security is worse than any virus.

You said you have XP, so the #1 thing you can do for your security is.......SP3. If you don't keep you OS up-to-date, no security programs can save you.

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