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Question

copieing a dvd made from a dvd/vcr recorder combo

by clintonc12 / December 10, 2012 12:09 PM PST

ok my dad has dumped another "geek savvy" project on me the last one was a breeze but i digress...he needs me to make copies of a dvd he made from an old vhs (its a family video perfectly legal in case you were wondering). but i am unsure of a few things mostly why when i put the dvd in my pc it shows no files and when i call it up in my video format converter still shows no file exists on the disc?!?! im wondering if his recorder records in an unrecognizable format for my dvd player? any help would be awesome

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All Answers

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Answer
Yes, it's possible
by Pepe7 / December 10, 2012 2:07 PM PST

It's quite possible that his recorder is using some odd format. Been there, done that ;).

You could try (paid) software such as Recover disc (meh) or ISO Buster (my fave) to see if anything is retrievable. Most of the free programs IME unfortunately don't do enough to get to the task at hand.

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Answer
The alternative would be
by Donhe7 / December 10, 2012 9:36 PM PST

to play the copied dvd back in the recorder which "wrote" it and either record the disk in another "burner" in real time, or, onto your HDD, and from there multiple copies could be made, using a dvd copying program in your computer, slower, but simpler to do

donhe7

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Answer
Re: dvd
by Kees_B Forum moderator / December 10, 2012 10:05 PM PST

Can he play it on his vcd/dvd recorder? And can you play it on a standard dvd-player? If not, what's the use of making copies?

Kees

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Answer
What recorder? No make or model but my DVDR3576H
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / December 11, 2012 12:31 AM PST

My Philips DVDR3576H makes such DVDs and the reason you can't see them is the session is not closed. On my DVDR3576H I have to fish through a menu to finalize the DVD so it will play on PCs and other DVD players.

Hope it's that.
Bob

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hope it just needs to be closed
by clintonc12 / December 11, 2012 1:10 AM PST

thanks for all the replies sorry im a bit slow responding in between these projects i also have to take care of my one year old. but tonight i intend to go borrow his recorder so i dont have to keep runingg back and fourth to his house and will attempt to check for a closure setting. again thanks for all your responses

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