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Converting vinyl records & cassettes to digital mp3 quality

by BiblioPhil / February 14, 2010 6:06 AM PST

I have many old LPs that I would like to convert to digital so I can listen to them on my mp3 or CD player. My old all-in-one "stereo" would need to be serviced before I can do this. Or, I could buy something that will do it easily in one or two steps.

I am told that conversion via my stereo and using Audacity or some other software would not give me a truly digital-quality final product.

But the products I have seen so far on the internet (the Ion turntable, Crosley or Teac all-in-one converters, etc.) all have their share of really negative reviews.

Any ideas would be appreciated.

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Do you have...

A Line In jack on your PC? If so you can use that to record LPs and Cassettes. I have been copying old cassettes to mp3 and what I use is a Audio Cable ( http://tinyurl.com/PCaudiocable ), Audacity, and a regular cassette player. As far as making it Digital Quality, unfortunately, nothing can make it digital. It will just preserve the quality of the LPs and cassettes as is. I hope this helps you out.

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Thank you
by BiblioPhil / February 14, 2010 10:05 AM PST
In reply to: Do you have...

I have RCA jacks to a video capture card--as well as an input that will accept the audio cable jack (5 mm) that you sent to me in your link--so I should be able to do as you say. Given your advice, I will get my stereo repaired and just capture the quality I have in the records.
It is good to hear that audacity can work well.

I have the audio cables i will need.

Thank you very much
Best of luck to you.

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How do I use Audacity
by BiblioPhil / February 20, 2010 3:16 AM PST
In reply to: Do you have...

I thought just connecting the cables would do it (I have "record out" on my stereo to either the audio of my video capture card or the "mini-in" to the computer.
I get sound to the computer through the mini-in input, but audacity doesn't "just work".
Any suggestions where I can get how to directions for audacity?
or can you just tell me?
Maybe if you can give me the link.
Thanks for any help you can give me. I got my stereo fixed and it sounds great!

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Audacity
by Dan Filice / February 20, 2010 5:43 AM PST
In reply to: How do I use Audacity

Just go to the menu and select New Project, then click the red record button. The problem I have with Audacity is that I can't hear what it's recording, but I can see the audio tracks being recorded, and the result proves it's recording. I don't use Audacity to record audio. I use Quicktime Pro as I can hear what's being recorded and it records a raw audio file. Then I use Audacity to trim unwanted audio and split the long audio tracks into individual tracks, and then Audacity is great for taking the selected audio and exporting to an mp3 or WAV file. I've used QT Pro and Audacity to create hundreds of mp3 audio files from turntable and reel-to-reel tapes.

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Audacity Help...
by pizzaboxmac93-23170347319 / February 28, 2010 4:45 AM PST
In reply to: How do I use Audacity

In Audacity, on the right side of the Microphone Volume Control, there should a menu to choose your source (Stereo Mix, Line In, Microphone, misc). It should be as simple as choosing your audio source. Hope this helps you out!

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Audacity Audio Input choice
by Dan Filice / February 28, 2010 6:08 AM PST
In reply to: Audacity Help...

On my Audacity, the line input has only one choice: "Default Input Source". It does not give me any choices other than that. I use the free download version. Do I get choices if I pay for the "real" version?

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Reguar or Beta?
by pizzaboxmac93-23170347319 / March 1, 2010 11:13 AM PST

On the Audacity webpage ( http://audacity.sourceforge.net ) did you download the Release (1.2.6) version or the Beta (1.3.11) version? I use the Release version with no problem. Also, try checking the recording settings at Edit > Preferences. Audacity may not have detected your sound card. Hope this helps!

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