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Convert MPEG audio files to play in car CD player?

by elliehowe / September 15, 2012 8:53 AM PDT

I recently purchased and downloaded songs from Amazon, and they are all in MPEG-1 Layer 3 format. I had to download some special software from Amazon to be able to play them on my PC. Now I want to convert them to a format I can play on my car CD player. Would that be WAV? Or something else?

How would I convert them? Some special software? Or?

I had purchased some songs from iTunes awhile ago, and they were labeled as "Protected AAC audio format." I was able to simply copy those from my PC to a CD that works well in my car. (My PC has Windows 7, if that's relevant...)

I am a newbie at this audio stuff -- MP3 and MP4 and all. I'm still stuck back in WAV I think... so once again I turn to my friends/advisors/saviors/experts/buddies at CNET Forums to help me. Many thanks! Ellie

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All Answers

Best Answer chosen by elliehowe

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It's a mp3 file
by Ed Mead Forum moderator / September 15, 2012 8:42 PM PDT
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My MPEG- 1 Layer 3 audio files are MP3s?
by elliehowe / September 16, 2012 1:36 PM PDT
In reply to: It's a mp3 file

Hi, Ed!

Thanks so much for your rapid response. After leaving this site I'm going to download the burning program you recommended.

Another question then, if this works... Some of the songs I found online to buy are labeled as MP3 audio files. If I buy one of those, can I just use the burning program to convert it to a regular audio file? If I find any other audio file formats (WAV maybe?), will this burning program convert those to a regular audio file I can play in my car CD?

I'm really excited that you've told me how to do the conversions... There are so many old songs that I can only find on the internet to buy -- but I don't want to have to sit at my PC all day to listen to them!

Thanks again, Ed!


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Final Follow Up on This Topic
by elliehowe / September 29, 2012 12:07 PM PDT
In reply to: It's a mp3 file

Hi again, Ed!

Today I finally had time to burn my MP3 audio tracks using the free Burn Aware Free program that you had recommended. It was easy to use and did exactly what I needed it to do. I am very grateful that you took time to answer my question by telling me about this "user-friendly" program. Thanks, Ed!

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converting mpeg formats to audio formats
by Pattycakebakeacake / December 16, 2013 1:43 AM PST
In reply to: It's a mp3 file

Thanks so much Ed Mead I have been trying to figure out how to do this for a long time and I was so excited to finally find something that works and is actually free. I really appreciate it as they were Christmas gifts and the people loved them. Happy Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year

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However ...
by Kees_B Forum moderator / September 15, 2012 9:15 PM PDT

if the CD player in your car is able to play aac files (you say you simply copied them and that works) it's not totally unlikely at all it will be able to play these mp3 files also (although they might be copy protected). Worth a try to simply copy them to a CR-RW and see what happens.

If it doesn't work, do what Ed says: burn as audio CD. The disadvantage: an audio CD contains 70 minutes of music at most. A cd with aac or mp3 (depending on the quality) can contain 700 minutes, so you might prefer that.


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My MPEG-1 Layer 3 audio files are MP3 audio files?
by elliehowe / September 16, 2012 1:49 PM PDT
In reply to: However ...

Hello, Kees_B!

Thank you so much for responding to my plea for help. I don't know how I would ever manage in this high-tech world had I not discovered CNET Forums. (I am very old and truly behind the times when it comes to computers and iPads and apps and droids and clouds....) Forum members have helped me sooooooo many times when I've been up the creek so to speak.

I'll try right now to copy a few to a DC -- er, I mean CD -- to see what happens, as you suggested. If it doesn't work, then I'll use the program Ed mentioned to convert them to audio files. There are so many wonderful and obscure songs I find on the Internet -- every genre -- one hit wonders -- no longer on "vinyl" -- so I buy them, but I don't want to have to sit at my PC all day to listen to them. That's why I want to put them onto regular CDs to play on my "boom box" (do they still call them boom boxes?) or in my car.

It would be great if I could get 700 minutes of music onto one CD, but I am used to having just 70 minutes, so I guess I will survive if that's all I can get.

Many many thanks again for coming to my rescue!


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Reporting Back : Success!
by elliehowe / September 23, 2012 1:28 PM PDT

Hello to all,

(I'm sorry it has taken me so long to report back to you...)

Kees, I did what you said -- just copied them to a CD since it had worked before, and eureka! The CD worked perfectly in my car. The display on my car CD said MP3; I guess I didn't notice that in the past.

I also tried my "new" CD in an old (8+ years) boombox, but it did not work. So I downloaded the program that Ed recommended and will make another CD for the boombox.

Once again, I thank you all for reading my query and for your prompt and obviously VERY helpful replies. As I boogie down the Highway of Life now listening to my "new" CD, I will be saying a little prayer of thanks to my friends at CNET Forums -- between music tracks.

Cheers! - Ellie

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