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Comcast Cable Internet vs. Qwest Fiber Optic DSL (Denver)

by mmaness0 / August 27, 2008 4:44 AM PDT

I live in the Denver area and I just signed up for Qwest's new "fiber optic" DSL (Fiber optic to the area node, DSL to the home). I was previously using Comcast Cable Internet. The DSL speed is supposed to be 12mbps down and 896kbps up. At first I thought this was much faster than Comcast's 8mbps down and 800ish up (I think they may have recently upgraded to 2mbps up), but I currently have both running at my home and the bandwidth tests show that the Comcast Cable is much faster! It shows the DSL speed around the 12mbps/896kbps, but shows the Comcast speed at around 20mbps/1.5mbps!!! Is this correct? Does this have to do with their new "Powerboost" technology?

Also, the tests show that Comcast has a much better (lower)ping. I have a PS3 hooked up to wireless for online gaming so this might be the most important factor to me. Is the ping really better with Comcast?

I need to make a decision about which service to keep, the cost is about the same for either.

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There's the clue ->"DSL to the home"
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / August 27, 2008 4:51 AM PDT

That means all the speed limits are in full force. The ping time is too variable for me to comment on but it's well discussed "out there."

What you wrote makes perfect sense in my world and how I think things work.
Bob

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Is it correct that...
by mmaness0 / August 27, 2008 6:15 AM PDT

...Ping is the most important factor when determining the speed for online gaming?

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Depends on the game.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / August 27, 2008 6:17 AM PDT
In reply to: Is it correct that...

Those SHOOTERS would be the most important...

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I don't think you're getting DSL. . .
by Coryphaeus / August 27, 2008 6:00 AM PDT

As it's an analog signal and it'll never reach those speeds. You're getting digital over fiber. They may call it DSL but it's not. But it is fast.

I have Comcast/Time Warner/Roadrunner (pick one). And I get a solid eleven meg down on some tests, over twenty on other tests.

Try this speed test site http://www.speakeasy.net/speedtest/ and pick a server near you.

Remember this. Time of day, net congestion, and a ton of other variables affect speed. Do the test at different times of the day.

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