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Clean my computer of unused files and add memory (manually)

by gtdavid / August 7, 2004 2:28 AM PDT

My computer is very slow.I want to rid it of things I do not need or use.MORE SPEED is what I need.I run windows 95 on a sony vaio model#pcv-210. Thank You. gtdavid.

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Re: Clean my computer of unused files and add memory (manual
by TONI H / August 7, 2004 3:52 AM PDT

DELETABLES IF YOU ARE RUNNING WINDOWS 95/98

NOTE: IF YOU USE A DUAL BOOT TO DOS, SOME OF THE FILES IN YOUR DOS FOLDER SHOULD BE LEFT ALONE, SUCH AS .LOG, .OLD, ETC CHECK THESE FIRST BEFORE YOU DELETE THEM.

ANOTHER NOTE: BEFORE YOU DELETE THE .TXT FILES, OPEN THEM UP TO SEE IF THEY ARE ONES YOU CREATED AND WANT TO SAVE. IF THEY ARE README FILES FOR PROGRAMS WITH INSTALL OR OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS, PRINT THEM FIRST THEN YOU CAN DELETE THEM. SAME THING WITH ANY .DOC FILES. YOU CAN SAFELY DELETE THE VENDORINFO, LICENSE, ORDER, AND REGISTRATION .TXT OR .DOC FILES. ALSO CHECK THE .WRI FILES

..TXT .DOC .WRI .PRV .LOG .OLD ._. .DOS .BAK .000 .001 .002 (ETC) WIN95UNDO.DAT (IF YOU NEVER PLAN ON GETTING RID OF W95) .CHK MSCREATE.DIR WIN32.S (ALSO REM THIS IN SYSTEM.INI) ~MSSETUP.T ALMOST EVERY FILE THAT BEGINS WITH ~ (CHECK DATE FIRST AND WAIT UNTIL IT IS AT LEAST A WEEK OLD)

IN TEMP FOLDERS....ONLY DELETE .TMP, .~MP, AND ._MP FILES THAT ARE ONE WEEK OLD OR OLDER

IN DOS FOLDER (IF YOU HAVE ONE)...SCANDISK AND DEFRAG FILES (ONLY IF YOU ARE USING THE W95/98 VERSION located in the Windows folder) MSAV MSBACKUP MWBACKUP

ALL WINDOWS FILES WITH THE FOLLOWING DATES....3-10-92, 9-30-92, 11-1-93, AND 12-31-93 THESE ARE ALL WINDOWS 3.X FILES THAT HAVE BEEN REPLACED BY W95

REGEDIT..EDIT..FIND..TYPE IN SHELLNEW DELETE ALL FILE TYPES SUCH AS AMNIPRO, ETC THAT YOU WILL PROBABLY NEVER HAVE A REASON TO NEED OR WANT.

If someone is running low on disk space, a good place to look is at the ..ibx and .mbx files in the Mail folder. This folder holds every message they have received or sent plus all the ones they have "deleted". You can save important messages before you send them and can save read messages before you delete them by clicking File and then Save As. By going to your Tools\Options in the toolbar and on the General tab, check Empty Messages from the Deleted Folder on Exit (this is located now in the Maintenance Tab in OE5 and higher)..in the Send tab, uncheck Save a copy in the Sent Folder...click Apply, then click OK. If you already have alot of messages in your Mail folder, you may have to read the .mbx files (open them in Outlook Express to do this), find the ones you want to save, highlight them, and save them to a separate file...then delete the .ibx and .mbx files for Inbox, Outbox, Sent, and Delete...they will rebuild themselves the next time you open your mail program when you send or receive new messages...but you won't be building up alot of harddrive space
anymore with the new settings in your mail program. OE5 and higher now uses .dbx as the file extension for mail so if you've upgraded, do a search for that extension instead.

Wanna free up some more space on your hard drive(s)? What files could be safe to delete? Here's a short list that covers the major files that might disappear without disastrous ramifications. Keep in mind that YOUR MILEAGE MAY VARY (YMMV), so instead of deleting the files first, move them to a "Delete" folder; when you've run your computer without encountering any related problems for a couple of months, it is probably safe to get rid of everything in that "Delete" folder. To find these files, hit the "F3" key and type in "*.XXX" with .XXX being the listed extension. Make sure you search your entire computer instead of simply one folder!

* .CHK -- Scandisk backup file; if there's lost clusters found when you run Scandisk, these files will be created. They will not come back, but new ones can be created with future Scandisk uses.
* .GRP -- Program Manager Group file; if you never use Program Manager anymore, why keep these around? They will not come back, but an install program could create new ones.
* .GID -- HLP-related file; when you run a Help file, it creates a "GID" to make future accesses to that particular help file a tad quicker. They're a complete waste of space, and usually the worst disk-hog offenders. You'll have to delete these on a regular basis, as they are recreated with every Help file execution.
* .FTS -- HLP-related file; when you perform a search with a Help file, this is created to make all future searches be performed quicker. Eh, not worth having around unless you use HLP files on a daily basis. They'll reappear if you do a search in a HLP file, so these should be regularly scanned for and deleted.
* .CNT -- HLP-related file; ever notice those tables of contents when you launch certain Help files? If you don't need a table to help you navigate through a Help file, delete these. They will not come back.
* .AVI -- Movie file; if you know how to use Windows, don't keep these things around. Make sure you "watch" them before deleting them, because you might delete a movie you wanted to keep. Still, they could be lurking on your hard drive(s).
* .TMP -- Temporary file; when you exit out of Windows without shutting down everything, these files could be littering your hard drive (typically, they can be found in the \Windows\Temp\ folder). Many programs have temp files to help speed up processes; they're a necessary evil. You might find hundreds of these just waiting to be deleted.
* .~MP -- Temporary file; see .tmp.
* .BAK -- Old file; when a new version of a program comes along, sometimes it will rename the old version with an .bak extension. Be careful when removing these files.
* .$$$ - Old file; see .bak (usually, not always)
* .OLD -- Old file; see .bak.

* What to Throw Away
When you install (or upgrade) to Windows 98, there are many files placed in your root and Windows directories that can be deleted. These include:

In your root directory:
Anything with the extensions *.TXT, *.PRV, *.LOG, *.OLD, *.- - -, and *.DOS (unless you use the dual-boot feature)

If you don't plan on uninstalling Windows 98, you can delete WIN95UNDO.DAT (if it's there).
In your Windows directory:
Anything with the extensions *.LOG, *.OLD, *.- - -, *.BAK, and *.000, *.001 (and so on...)

Any files with the following dates can also be deleted, for they belong to old versions of Windows:
03-10-92 - Windows 3.1
09-30-92 - Windows for Workgroups 3.1
11-01-93 - Windows for Workgroups 3.11
12-31-93 - Windows 3.11

Do a search (Start Menu -> Find -> Files or Folders) and search for any *.BMP and *.TXT files in the Windows 98 directory. Use QuickView or MSPaint to view the BMP files and Notepad to view the TXT files, and delete them if desired.

In your Windows\System directory:
The entire WIN32S directory under your System directory - this is used only in Windows 3.x to allow certain 32-bit applications to run, but some older applications errantly install it in Windows 98. If you remove this directory, make sure to remove any references to it in your SYSTEM.INI file, and restart Windows 98.

In your Temp directory (usually Windows\Temp):
You should never delete any files from this directory, unless the dates of the files are earlier than the last time you booted up. Your applications use these files to store temporary information, and won't function properly if you try to remove them. Usually, any files in this directory that are more than a day old can be safely removed.

Anywhere on your system:
Other files that can be deleted include MSCREATE.DIR (an absolutely useless hidden file created by Microsoft installation programs - there may be hundreds of these empty files on your hard disk - see Slack Space.)
Any directory named, ~MSSETUP.T - this is a temporary directory created during the installation of a program, and can be freely deleted once the installation is complete.

Uninstallation Files:
There may be up to 70 megabytes of "uninstallation" information - files kept around if you decide to remove Windows 98 (assuming you've upgraded from Windows 95).
The best way to get rid of these files (surprisingly) is to use the Tune-Up Wizard - don't bother with the scheduling of Scandisk and Disk Defragmenter (unless you want to) - it will present you with a list of the useless files you can remove. Hack away!

<B>Files NOT to delete:</B>
Anything in your SYSBCKUP directory.
Your Registry (SYSTEM.DAT, SYSTEM.DA0, USER.DAT, USER.DA0), as well as SYSTEM.1ST, which you can use if the first four become corrupted.
Any files in your root directory not mentioned above.
If in doubt:
If you're not sure if something should be deleted, try moving it to another directory first to see if it makes a difference.
Check the file's date - if it's recent, most likely it's still being used.
For information on removing a particular application, contact the manufacturer of that application, or refer to the application's documentation.

Many times, after installing an application, the program will leave temporary or compressed work files on the drive, but not in a TEMP area. These files will clutter your drive, and would be difficult to detect if vendors didn't use some simple standards. There are several standards for these files, but fortunately not too many to
prevent locating and cleaning them up. Search your whole hard drive with File Find for files named _*.* , ~*.* , *.??_ , and *.??~ .

Using File Find, locate *.GID. These files are help index files which get created whenever you use help in an application. Deleting the files will provide you with some disk space, and in the event you actually need to use help within an application, the files are recreated automatically upon usage.

Also locate *.AVI. Several applications, including many Microsoft applications use these animation files to help users master skills like pointing, clicking, dragging, maximizing, minimizing, etc.
Chances are your hard drive contains many of these files which are of no use to anyone except the most novice of users.

When installing applications, most software vendors include simple text files to deal with problems that may arise. Sometimes the files
contain important information about driver releases, and support contact information, but most are seldom needed past the installation stage. Use File Find to located *READ*ME*. You'll be surprised at how many there actually are.

TONI

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Re: Clean my computer of unused files and add memory (manual
by reefurbb / August 7, 2004 10:22 PM PDT

use alt+ctrl+delete to bring up the dialog box. highlite others programs running in the background and "end task" to temporarily turn these off. See if you are now faster.
If so, download a free 30 day trial of System Mechanic at www.iolo.com.
go to 2nd tab "System", then "windows startup manager".
your slowdown comes from many things starting up when W95 starts and they run in the background.
It also has a safe junk file deletion and registry clean.

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