Camcorders forum

Question

Cannot transfer videos from Canon HG10

by thiruaru / June 2, 2012 4:12 PM PDT

Other websites say that once you plug the camera into the USB port, it would be recognized as an external hard drive to transfer the videos off of. When I plug in the camera it remains unrecognized and doesn't show up at all. How do I transfer the videos to my computer then?

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Clarification Request
Did it ever work? (show up as a drive?)
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / June 3, 2012 4:04 AM PDT

If not, then you either have a dud camcorder, bad cable or PC issue. Try another PC first since the camcorder maker does not repair your PC.
Bob

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Never did
by thiruaru / June 6, 2012 9:21 AM PDT

Never did show up as an external drive and we tried 4 other computers and it only showed up on one.

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And tell more about the one?
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / June 6, 2012 9:55 AM PDT
In reply to: Never did

My bet is it's some PC with a factory installed OS. I'm finding many owners lost about XP and drivers. Sadly I only write about drivers but can't go very deep about them other than you need them.

Also, XP didn't support USB 2.0 yet you wrote XP below. USB 2.0 support was added later.
Bob

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Clarification Request
Movie editing software for a Canon Vixia HF R52
by fivekampers / November 7, 2015 6:57 AM PST

We film college basketball games and want to combine the scenes created by pauses during filming into complete games that can be burned to DVD. We first tried using our Toshiba satellite L675 with 2GBs RAM and Windows 10, but the entire system hung when we tried to combine the files into a movie. Next we tried Windows Movie Maker on a Dell Latitude E7440 i7 with 8 GB Ram running Windows 7, and have been able to successfully merge several smaller videos, but the process fails when we try to combine an entire game. The Movie Maker process runs for two hours, and generates an 8GB file that is not readable.

So, a couple questions, and your input will be most appreciated.

1. Should we be able to use Windows Movie Maker to successfully combine so many files, or do we need to buy some proprietary software? If so, does anyone have recommendations?

2. Is 8GBs RAM sufficient for what we are trying to do?

3. Any other tips on combining multiple large AVCHD files from a camcorder into a single movie and burning to a DVD? Thanks for any guidance you can provide.

Saw the following answer by boya84 to a similar question and hope to find a solution to our problem:

http://www.cnet.com/forums/discussions/cannot-transfer-videos-from-canon-hg10-564587/

by boya84 / June 3, 2012 2:14 AM PDT
In reply to: Cannot transfer videos from Canon HG10
to get the highly compressed AVCHD video into a computer.
Connect the HG10's USB port to the computer's USB port and put the HG10 in Play or PC mode.

1) When the camcorder shows up as an external drive, locate the MTS files and copy them to the computer. If you want to play back the video, VLC Player is a good tool. If you want to edit the video, then the MTS files need to be transcoded to something useful. MPEG Streamclip from www.squared5.com or Handbrake from www.handbrake.fr are both very useful.

2) Use an AVCHD-capable video editor to import or capture the video. The editor will deal with that transcoding and decompression step. Relatively current versions of Sony Vegas and Adobe Premiere are the usual suspects for the Windows environment as it is only recently that MovieMaker became AVCHD capable (assuming the computer hardware is acceptable). Apple Macintosh OSX and iMovie and Final Cut (Express and Pro) have been able to deal with AVCHD video for several years... assuming adequate RAM, available hard disc space and CPU...

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Be sure not to bury new questions in 3+ year old posts.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / November 7, 2015 7:26 AM PST

Folks may miss if there is any new question here.

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Video editing is probably
by boya84 / November 9, 2015 1:43 PM PST

one of the most computer-resource intensive things "normal" people can do with a computer. This was true when it was standard definition video and even more so dealing with high definition video. While there have been CPU and other various improvements to computer hardware and operating systems, video continues to be a system hog. There are a couple of things that happen on a computer in the editing and rendering process. The high definition video is brought into the video editor, transcoded and decompressed. Editing happens and the resulting file should be exported/rendered.

We don't know what you are rendering to.

Once the rendering is done, take that file to a DVD authoring application.
1) If the rendered file is high definition (WMV, AVI, MP4 or whatever), then the video editor does the downsampling to standard def video and the DVD authoring application needs to only to do the VOB transcoding.

2) If the final video project in the video editor is rendered to a standard definition format, then the DVD authoring app needs only to do the VOB transcoding.

3) If MovieMaker is using a DVD rendering application as a built-in item, then the video editor is being used as a hybrid and cannot expect to do either very well...

All three methods are extremely computationally challenging. The video files take a lot of space, too.

Why ramble about all this? There are a few things going on in a computer when there is not enough RAM to cover everything. The 40+ minutes of game play you captured - assuming capture at highest quality, will be upwards of 30 gig. You can't fit 30 gig of work into 2, or 8 gig of RAM. In order to do the work, the computer reads a chunk to be done from the hard drive, does the work, then writes the result to the hard drive. When there is not enough RAM, the chunks of work can be smaller - the operating system creates virtual memory.

Virtual memory is free space on a hard drive (the start-up drive) that gets designated as RAM. That means that all the reading/writing in and out of physical RAM extends to also reading/writing in and out of the hard drive. Typically, a hard drive with spinning platters installed in an affordable laptop spins at 5400 rpm. A "regular" desktop hard drive spins at 7200 RPM. A "multimedia" hard drive spins at 10,000 rpm.

When you get a new computer with a new hard drive, all the operating system files are in one place, all the application files are in one place and the contents of the hard drive are contiguous - and the free space is contiguous, too. When this is the case, the virtual memory is all in one place. Over time, the space becomes fragmented. That means document "X" is now stored in a bunch of different places on the hard drive and the available space becomes fragmented, too (and remember, free space on the hard drive is used as virtual memory - RAM).

If the start-up drive has less than about 20% available free space, the computer is courting disaster - especially when combined with fragmentation of video files and virtual memory all running on a (slow) laptop drive.

While all this stuff is going on with the application pulling in chunks of work and spitting out the result to the (slow) laptop internal hard drive, the computer is still running the operating system and some other background applications. Perhaps even connected to a network and running anti-malware... Keep all the above in the background... and lets move to your questions.

1) Yes, MovieMaker should be able to deal with what you want to do - but we don't know a lot about the computer, virtual memory, other apps running, available space, etc. I would caution anyone wanting to do high definition video work on a laptop not designed to do that. Sort of like expecting unrefined oil as fuel in a gas powered car to do the work of 91 octane gasoline...

2) 8 gig physical RAM is the minimum amount of RAM needed for high definition video editing and depends on how much contiguous hard drive space is available for virtual memory. I strongly suggest use of an external drive for the video file project files. This way, the video files are stored away from the start-up drive and the internal drive does not need to be totally responsible for all that video editing overhead. The video editor pulls in video data from the external drive, does what it needs to do, writes that out to the external drive... A multimedia drive is not necessary - but a 7200 RPM external 3.5 inch drive connected via USB3 is strongly recommended.

3) Sony Vegas is much better than Windows MovieMaker... but the analogy is comparing a Chevy Impala to a Cadillac XTS... but if either is trying to run on the unrefined oil, then it really dos not matter which vehicle (or video editor) is used.

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Video editing is probably
by boya84 / November 9, 2015 1:43 PM PST

one of the most computer-resource intensive things "normal" people can do with a computer. This was true when it was standard definition video and even more so dealing with high definition video. While there have been CPU and other various improvements to computer hardware and operating systems, video continues to be a system hog. There are a couple of things that happen on a computer in the editing and rendering process. The high definition video is brought into the video editor, transcoded and decompressed. Editing happens and the resulting file should be exported/rendered.

We don't know what you are rendering to.

Once the rendering is done, take that file to a DVD authoring application.
1) If the rendered file is high definition (WMV, AVI, MP4 or whatever), then the video editor does the downsampling to standard def video and the DVD authoring application needs to only to do the VOB transcoding.

2) If the final video project in the video editor is rendered to a standard definition format, then the DVD authoring app needs only to do the VOB transcoding.

3) If MovieMaker is using a DVD rendering application as a built-in item, then the video editor is being used as a hybrid and cannot expect to do either very well...

All three methods are extremely computationally challenging. The video files take a lot of space, too.

Why ramble about all this? There are a few things going on in a computer when there is not enough RAM to cover everything. The 40+ minutes of game play you captured - assuming capture at highest quality, will be upwards of 30 gig. You can't fit 30 gig of work into 2, or 8 gig of RAM. In order to do the work, the computer reads a chunk to be done from the hard drive, does the work, then writes the result to the hard drive. When there is not enough RAM, the chunks of work can be smaller - the operating system creates virtual memory.

Virtual memory is free space on a hard drive (the start-up drive) that gets designated as RAM. That means that all the reading/writing in and out of physical RAM extends to also reading/writing in and out of the hard drive. Typically, a hard drive with spinning platters installed in an affordable laptop spins at 5400 rpm. A "regular" desktop hard drive spins at 7200 RPM. A "multimedia" hard drive spins at 10,000 rpm.

When you get a new computer with a new hard drive, all the operating system files are in one place, all the application files are in one place and the contents of the hard drive are contiguous - and the free space is contiguous, too. When this is the case, the virtual memory is all in one place. Over time, the space becomes fragmented. That means document "X" is now stored in a bunch of different places on the hard drive and the available space becomes fragmented, too (and remember, free space on the hard drive is used as virtual memory - RAM).

If the start-up drive has less than about 20% available free space, the computer is courting disaster - especially when combined with fragmentation of video files and virtual memory all running on a (slow) laptop drive.

While all this stuff is going on with the application pulling in chunks of work and spitting out the result to the (slow) laptop internal hard drive, the computer is still running the operating system and some other background applications. Perhaps even connected to a network and running anti-malware... Keep all the above in the background... and lets move to your questions.

1) Yes, MovieMaker should be able to deal with what you want to do - but we don't know a lot about the computer, virtual memory, other apps running, available space, etc. I would caution anyone wanting to do high definition video work on a laptop not designed to do that. Sort of like expecting unrefined oil as fuel in a gas powered car to do the work of 91 octane gasoline...

2) 8 gig physical RAM is the minimum amount of RAM needed for high definition video editing and depends on how much contiguous hard drive space is available for virtual memory. I strongly suggest use of an external drive for the video file project files. This way, the video files are stored away from the start-up drive and the internal drive does not need to be totally responsible for all that video editing overhead. The video editor pulls in video data from the external drive, does what it needs to do, writes that out to the external drive... A multimedia drive is not necessary - but a 7200 RPM external 3.5 inch drive connected via USB3 is strongly recommended.

3) Sony Vegas is much better than Windows MovieMaker... but the analogy is comparing a Chevy Impala to a Cadillac XTS... but if either is trying to run on the unrefined oil, then it really dos not matter which vehicle (or video editor) is used.

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Years later. Nice reply but why here?
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / November 9, 2015 1:54 PM PST

This old thread is closing.

All Answers

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Answer
There are two ways
by boya84 / June 3, 2012 2:14 AM PDT

to get the highly compressed AVCHD video into a computer.

Connect the HG10's USB port to the computer's USB port and put the HG10 in Play or PC mode.

1) When the camcorder shows up as an external drive, locate the MTS files and copy them to the computer. If you want to play back the video, VLC Player is a good tool. If you want to edit the video, then the MTS files need to be transcoded to something useful. MPEG Streamclip from www.squared5.com or Handbrake from www.handbrake.fr are both very useful.

2) Use an AVCHD-capable video editor to import or capture the video. The editor will deal with that transcoding and decompression step. Relatively current versions of Sony Vegas and Adobe Premiere are the usual suspects for the Windows environment as it is only recently that MovieMaker became AVCHD capable (assuming the computer hardware is acceptable). Apple Macintosh OSX and iMovie and Final Cut (Express and Pro) have been able to deal with AVCHD video for several years... assuming adequate RAM, available hard disc space and CPU...

You have not told us which computer, operating system, RAM, hard disc drive space, CPU... for all we know, your computer is underpowered... You have also not told us what you want to do with the video...

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My computer
by thiruaru / June 6, 2012 9:20 AM PDT
In reply to: There are two ways

It doesn't show up as an external drive at all or anything. We use a Windows XP Home version, Intel Pentium 4 CPU 3.20 Ghz and 0.99 gb of Ram, 190 GB hard drive.

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Did you ever get a solution??
by annemarieac / September 14, 2012 3:25 PM PDT
In reply to: My computer

I'm having the same issue. My computer doesn't even see my HG10 and it's running Windows 7.

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What worked for me
by MichaelFMC / June 17, 2014 7:07 PM PDT

I had the same problem using Windows 7 until I plugged in the power supply. Opened the drive for the Canon HD10 immediately.

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Answer
USB access to the Hard Drive
by JAD1834 / September 28, 2015 11:12 AM PDT

You have to remove the battery while plugged into external power source. This was left out of many of the procedure web pages. The camera will not go into PC mode while the battery is in the camera.

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