Computer Help

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Can't End Processes In Task Manager

by JimHess / July 28, 2010 12:42 PM PDT

I just researched every process that is shown in Task Manager on my computer, and almost every one of them is something important that shouldn't be stopped. However, there are two entries that have to do with Online Armor, an antivirus-type program that I tried for a while last year. I didn't care for it and uninstalled it, so I was surprised that it is still showing up in Task Manager. I clicked End Process for both of the entries, but with each one it says, "Unable to Terminate Process. The operation could not be completed. Access is denied". I used the Search function from the Start menu, and for each one I got, "Error Deleting File or Folder. Cannot delete. Access is denied. Make sure the disk is not full or write-protected and the the file is not currently in use."
The names of the files are; oacat.exe and oasrv.exe.
Is there some other way to get rid of these entries?
Just as a footnote, when I used the Search function each of the files showed up on my hard drive and on the external hard drive that I use to back up the computer. I was able to delete each file from the external hard drive, but not from the computer's hard drive.

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Access denied?
by MarkFlax Forum moderator / July 28, 2010 7:40 PM PDT

If this were an XP system, I would suggest How to take ownership of a file or folder in XP.

I see you have mentioned XP in other posts, so that would be a good start.

Mark

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A Little Nervous
by JimHess / July 28, 2010 10:28 PM PDT
In reply to: Access denied?

Thank you for replying, Mark. I'm sorry that I neglected to state that I'm using Windows XP Home, SP3. I took your link to the Microsoft instructions for taking ownership of a file. I've never accessed Safe Mode, though I've read about doing so in these forums. I wrote down all of the instructions that they gave, but I'm a little nervous about getting in there and possibly changing the wrong thing by accident or misunderstanding.
One more question before I "get under the hood" in Safe Mode. What if I installed that program that the files go with again, then uninstalled it using Revo Uninstaller, a program that goes after the bits and pieces that get left behind after a program in uninstalled? I don't know why the files got left behind in the first place, but might that possibly catch them this time? Or would that just be a waste of time?

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Guess who?
by emilybry / July 29, 2010 1:34 AM PDT
In reply to: A Little Nervous

Guess who this is???...

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Safe mode is fine
by MarkFlax Forum moderator / July 29, 2010 5:00 AM PDT
In reply to: A Little Nervous

It is a 'safe' version of XP. It looks quite different because only generic drivers are loaded, so for instance no special video drivers are loaded, only the pre-installed VGA ones, and this means when you get to the Desktop there will be no wallpaper and the background will be black with the words "Safe Mode" in each of the four corners of the display. The screen resolution will be lower, so everything will be larger, icons and all, and not so well defined. Navigation will be a little tricky because of the larger windows.

But that's fine. In Safe Mode none of the usual software you have installed yourself will be loaded, and this makes it easier to delete things.

Try it and see. You may not even need to do the Take Ownership steps.

At this stage I would not use any utilities like Revo, even when you reboot back to normal mode.

Tell us how you get on.

Mark

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Yay! Many Thanks!
by JimHess / July 29, 2010 2:08 PM PDT
In reply to: Safe mode is fine

Thank you very much, Mark, for your helpfulness and encouragement. I literally couldn't, or wouldn't have done it without your help. The first time I went to Safe Mode I was a bit intimidated and confused. One reason was because in the initial instructions the importance of Administrator rights was emphasized, and when Safe Mode started it gave me the choice of "Administrator" or my icon, so I picked "Administrator". Safe Mode looks a bit different anyway, but the "Administrator" settings were foreign to me, and I wasn't sure how to proceed and soon gave up and exited Safe Mode.
I decided to go to my Plan B, which was to install the program again and hope the uninstall would take the rogue files with it. The computer would not let me install the program! That has never happened before, and I guess it was due to those files.
I got my courage up and went to Safe Mode again, but this time I clicked on my settings, since I have administrator rights. Now Safe Mode looked more familiar. I went to Task Manager and it didn't show the bad files. In fact, it only showed 13 out of the 50+ that normally run on the computer. I went to the Search function of the Start menu, located each file and deleted both of them without a problem! Shut 'er down, started 'er up, and the renegade files are no longer in Task Manager! MISSION ACCOMPLISHED! Thanks again, Mark. I got the job done and learned a lot, too! You guys are great!

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That's great.
by MarkFlax Forum moderator / July 29, 2010 8:20 PM PDT
In reply to: Yay! Many Thanks!

Good work.

I remember the first time I visited Safe Mode on my old Windows 95 system. I thought I had busted the computer! Happy

But then, with Windows 95 that was one of many visits to Safe Mode. Ahh, happy days.

Congratulations on getting the problem sorted.

Mark

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I think you have this fixed but ............
by Dango517 / July 30, 2010 4:06 PM PDT

You can cleanly uninstall those programs by editing them out of the registry this should totally remove them from the system. Many Anti-virus programs need to be removed this way. See the software manufactures web site for details and instructions. Often they can not be removed simply using add/remove programs. Adding a new anti-virus program without removing a previous program correctly may become problematic. Regedit can be risky though and care needs to be taken in there not to remove things that can totally crash an OS.

http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/windows/xp/all/proddocs/en-us/tools_regeditors.mspx?mfr=true

Warning
?

Incorrectly editing the registry may severely damage your system. At the very least, you should back up any valued data on the computer before making changes to the registry.

Source Microsoft corporation in the link found above, use is "fair use".

Next time you might also have better luck with :

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb896653.aspx

This is M$ software but is a bit more involved then task manager. It can do things task manager can not.

Use these suggestions at your own risk.

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For Ending the processes in tack manager
by mvsagar / July 30, 2010 9:35 PM PDT

Try this steps one by one

1) Try to end the process from the processor tab not from the application tab in the task manager

2) Restart the system and enter into Safe mode (by pressing F8) and search for the file and delete.

3) Download CCleaner from the brothesoft.com and remove the unwanted file

Hope this steps will help u

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Thanks, Folks
by JimHess / July 31, 2010 5:48 AM PDT

Thank you for those extra ideas for removing troublesome .exe files.

Dango- I wouldn't dare try to monkey around in the Registry. That would be a recipe for disaster for me - way over my pay grade. I do think there might be something to be said for going to the manufacture's website, though the instructions, if you could finally find them, might tend to be a bit arcane. (They always seem to assume they're talking to someone a lot more knowledgeable than me.)

mvsgar- Your Step 1 didn't work in this particular case. The renegades weren't giving themselves up that easy. Your Step 2 is what I did, and it worked like a charm when I got up the nerve to navigate around in Safe Mode. As for CCleaner, I've been using it and I like it for cleaning up the computer. It hadn't found those files on it's own, which kind of surprised me. I didn't know about a way to ask it to go after certain particular .exe files.

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Dango- I wouldn't dare try to monkey around in the Registry.
by Dango517 / July 31, 2010 6:07 AM PDT
In reply to: Thanks, Folks

Yep might be a good idea for some to stay out of there but if you use anti-virus sometimes it's a must, sometimes.

Good luck.

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Start-up/registry? First rule = Play it safe ... then ...
by CKinVA / August 2, 2010 4:34 AM PDT

First: The offending programs are being automatically started via Windows registry entries, etc., processed at boot time ... ie: HKCU entries or commands in your login's or the 'all users' start directory (ie: c:\Documents and Settings\All Users\Start Menu\Programs\Startup).

To stop them from firing up you must update the start-up directory and/or the registry to deactivate/delete the offending entries (preferably update the registry via a safe registry editing tool like "Start-up Control" (http://www.mlin.net/StartupCPL.shtml)).

Notes:
a) You may have to start/boot the PC in 'safe' mode to get to things.
b) I always move start-up directory entries into a temp directory (rather than just deleting them) to deactivate them until I have re-tested the system.

Second: After the start-up/registry entries have been deactivated/deleted, re-start/boot the PC (in your normal mode).

Hopefully, everything on your PC now runs fine (and maybe even a little faster) ... test the PC/your important applications before you go any further.

Third: If new problems do appear/occur, use the start-up directory copies/registry backup to get back to where you were (ie: at least no more harm done).

Forth: If the offending programs are not executing and all the other stuff on your PC still runs fine, you should be able to delete the unwanted programs (and, if desired, their home directories, the backup copies you made, etc).

BIG NOTES:
-- Never, never, ever delete/change a registry entry unless you are sure you know what you are doing and you know you have a good back-up!
-- A good registry editing tool should create a backup of the just registry entries being changed so you can undo things if you make a mistake!
-- Never delete files or directories if you are not sure what they do ... especially any files/folders found in what may be system required directories (ie: "Windows", "Documents and Settings", "Application Data") and major hardware/software vendor directories (ie: "AMD", "Intel", "HP", Dell", "Sony", "Microsoft", etc)!
-- Generally try using the software products own 'uninstall' to clean-up (most) registry entries & files associated with the product; HOWEVER, if you are trying to remove a program you know to be a virus, trojan, etc., the uninstall that came with it may just make matters worse!
-- Always uninstall one anti-virus and/or firewall program before installing a replacement! Otherwise if you install a new product and then uninstall the old product you may screw up the new product (ie: the 'new' products install may overlay parts of the 'old', then the 'old' products uninstall may end up deleting parts of the 'new' not knowing the part wasn't an 'old' part)!

Use proper care and you'll have good luck.

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I would add to this list ..........
by Dango517 / August 2, 2010 4:58 AM PDT

Be careful with your keyboard while in the registry not to hit keys by mistake, mistakes you might not be able to find after making them. Done that! Started all over with new OS install. LOL

BIG NOTES:
-- Never, never, ever delete/change a registry entry unless you are sure you know what you are doing and you know you have a good back-up!
-- A good registry editing tool should create a backup of the just registry entries being changed so you can undo things if you make a mistake!
-- Never delete files or directories if you are not sure what they do ... especially any files/folders found in what may be system required directories (ie: "Windows", "Documents and Settings", "Application Data") and major hardware/software vendor directories (ie: "AMD", "Intel", "HP", Dell", "Sony", "Microsoft", etc)!
-- Generally try using the software products own 'uninstall' to clean-up (most) registry entries & files associated with the product; HOWEVER, if you are trying to remove a program you know to be a virus, trojan, etc., the uninstall that came with it may just make matters worse!
-- Always uninstall one anti-virus and/or firewall program before installing a replacement! Otherwise if you install a new product and then uninstall the old product you may screw up the new product (ie: the 'new' products install may overlay parts of the 'old', then the 'old' products uninstall may end up deleting parts of the 'new' not knowing the part wasn't an 'old' part)!

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Ask the mfr.
by porsche10x / August 4, 2010 9:10 AM PDT

I realize you may have solved your problem, but your best bet in cases like these is to contact the company that makes the product. For example, Symantec makes a special removal tool to completely remove Norton Antivirus. If you simply google "uninstall" and use Google's "advanced search" to limit your results to "online-armor.com" you will get lots of help on uninstalling Online Armor.

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Uninstalling Programs
by mewgirl / October 12, 2010 5:19 AM PDT

Almost all programs leave leftover registry entries and file/folders. Most leave the %AppData% folder, too. Some are stubborn and refuse to remove themselves when you uninstall - this applies to many antiviruses programs (or rather software that is marketed as such, but really isn't, such as Norton) and to RealPlayer. To completely uninstall any program, use REVO Uninstaller (http://www.revouninstaller.com/). Download the "free 30 day trial" - it doesn't expire.

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