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Can I Safely Remove Old SP 1 and SP 2 Updates?

by jstifel / February 8, 2013 11:46 PM PST

I'm running Windows XP Pro and the latest updates are for SP 3.

Without installing any new programs on my PC I've noted that almost all of my hard drive space has been taken up and I need to delete files to make more room. I've moved all of my graphics and large files to an external drive and my hard drive is still too full.

But I have hundreds of security updates going all the way back to 2010. And I have hundreds of security updates for Explorer 8, which I don't even use. And I have entries in Add/Remove Programs for Microsoft Net Framwork 1.1, 2.0 SP 2, and 3.0 SP 2, and 2.5 SP1, and I've got Visual C ++ 2005 and 2008....

Can I safely remove some of these to recover disk space since I have SP 3 and don't use IE8 and don't known if I really need all the other files.

Please help! Thanks

Judi

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All Answers

Best Answer as chosen by jstifel

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One word answer: No
by Jimmy Greystone / February 9, 2013 12:08 AM PST

Somewhat longer answer is that if you remove that particular update, it will expose you to that vulnerability again, quite possibly others. Most of those updates have been supplanted by more recent updates, because the same file(s) are in question. So you remove an older update, it puts back the version of the file from before that update, and you end up undoing any subsequent updates to that specific file.

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One Word Answer: No
by jstifel / February 13, 2013 11:14 PM PST
In reply to: One word answer: No

Jimmy,

Yesterday I had occasion to see a stark reminder of how right you are. Windows updated and I read the updates as they were installing and noted that one of them was for still for Sp2 and I'm running Sp3, so I can see that I would be in danger if I figured that Sp3 was replacing Sp2, which was my initial thought, because apparently it only supplements what was there from the updates on Sp2.

So, the lesson to be learned here is that no matter how much hard drive space you have, you need to plan for a LOT of it being occupied by future Windows updates, so you had better keep that in mind and buy a hard drive will plenty of excess space. I thought I had plenty but I didn't realize what a space hog Windows files are and would continue to be.

Thank you everyone for your help and valuable advice. I really appreciate it. I've moved all the files I can possibly move over to my Seagate drive and uninstalled everything I could safely do without. Now, I have to turn my attention to purchase of a new hard drive with ample space and then migrate everything over to it. I used to do this stuff myself professionally, but the technology has zoomed way past me now and I wouldn't even dare to go into CMOS to set up a new hard drive.. Heaven forbid!!

Thanks again,

Judi Happy

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Re: new hard drive
by Kees_B Forum moderator / February 13, 2013 11:24 PM PST
In reply to: One Word Answer: No

With XP, space used by Windows isn't a big issue. But the further you come (Vista, 7, Cool the more space Winodws needs, not only during install, but certainly also during the years to come.

But, luckily, there's no need to do anything in the BIOS when replacing the drive by a bigger one. But be aware that older machines don't support the latest disks. I shouldn't try to put an 4 TB disk in an older XP machine!
But, most likely, 250 or 500 GB will be fine.

Kees

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One Word Answer: No
by jstifel / February 14, 2013 3:47 AM PST
In reply to: Re: new hard drive

Thank you, Kees!

You must have been reading my mind. I'm thinking that I'll get some quotes for a 500 gig drive. I'm not teaching anymore or doing web sites and graphics professionally anymore, so I don't require more space than that at this time... and I don't plan to upgrade from XP since all my Adobe products are happy with it.. up to now.

I really appreciate your input.

Happy Valentines Day!

Judi Happy

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New Hard Drive
by jstifel / February 14, 2013 5:39 AM PST
In reply to: Re: new hard drive

Well, Kees,

Your solution was the only solution that is going to work for me. Since I used to build, upgrade, troubleshoot computers back in the day, I'm "fearless" when it comes to doing what needs doing if I can find instructions. But I've never cracked a case on a laptop or notebook so I was uncomfortable.

The local shop where I've dealt before wanted $315 to do the job for me, including new drive, but I can't afford that and also I didn't like the idea of paying someone 3 to 4 hours of labor who was doing other stuff while the backup program was running automatically to transfer the contents of my old drive onto a new one.

So, I called Lenova and the guy there was very helpful. I ordered the 500 GB, 5400 rpm drive to upgrade my full 120 gig drive and something called an Apricorn adapter which will make a clone of my old hard drive onto my new one and then I can just swap them out and my computer won't know the difference, except that I'll have more room.

I'm so thrilled.. This has only cost me $127.00 and I will even have a secondary drive if I want to use my old one in the Apricorn from my USB port, which might be a good secondary back-up for what's on the Seagate.

And what's really great is that I don't even have to mess with the BIOS...CMOS won't even need to be accessed. I couldn't be happier that this situation is now resolved.

Thank you to everyone who was so kind and generous to help me. I hope that if someone else comes here for help with a similar issue, the information we have recorded here will help them, too.

Thanks again and Happy Valentines Day!!

Judi Happy

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Answer
Re: updates
by Kees_B Forum moderator / February 8, 2013 11:50 PM PST

- Where exactly do you have those updates and how do you think to remove them?
- Did you already run the Disc Cleanup Wizard in all user accounts?

Kees

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Can I Safely Remove Old SP 1 and SP 2 Updates?
by jstifel / February 9, 2013 1:30 AM PST
In reply to: Re: updates

I see them all listed in my Add/Remove section of my Control Panel. Someone told me I could remove the Uninstall files, which I did, and I gained an additional 1 gig of space but my hard drive is nearly full now and the only added files to my hard drive are all the Microsoft files.

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Answer
Try this
by tonyron227 / February 9, 2013 2:58 AM PST

Buy a bigger hard drive then clone your old drive to the new drive. With the added space and newer drive your system will run much better.

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Try This
by jstifel / February 9, 2013 3:28 AM PST
In reply to: Try this

Buying a bigger hard drive would make the most sense. Unfortunately, having lost my job, like millions of other Americans, I'm lucky to be able to buy food right now, so what I can fix on my own without spending money is my only problem-solving choice.

Thanks.

Judi

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Answer
Re: .Net
by Kees_B Forum moderator / February 9, 2013 5:36 AM PST

If disk space is at a premium, it's a good idea to uninstall all .Net's and wait with reinstall until an application asks for it.
Please note that uninstalling only frees space after you run the Disc Cleanup Wizard and delete all but the latest System Restore points (under Advanced options). Until that time all uninstalling does is copying the files you uninstall to a safe place where they are stored by System Restore just in case you want to undo the uninstall by going back to a system restore point before the uninstall.
If you never did that, you'll notice that this simple cleanup can easily free a few GB of disc space or more.

Kees

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.net
by jstifel / February 9, 2013 10:33 AM PST
In reply to: Re: .Net

Thanks for the great advice. I will follow your directions and try to free up some more space.

Judi Happy

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Answer
Just noting also.
by Kees_B Forum moderator / February 9, 2013 6:01 AM PST

You moved all your graphics and large files to an external drive. Please remember that external drives are NOT meant as permanent storage. Having a file only on an external drive is a larger risk for losing it than having it only on an external disk. It's much safer to have it on both. It's really safe if you have a third copy somewhere else. A few GB on Dropbox is free. A few GB on Microsoft Skydrive is free. A few GB on Google Drive is free. All together you can your most valueable 10 GB safely stored in the cloud for free.

Kees

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Just noting also
by jstifel / February 9, 2013 10:39 AM PST
In reply to: Just noting also.

Thanks for the reminder. I've moved all large graphics and documents and videos to my Seagate drive and was thinking that I really need to also copy to some DVDs just in case my Seagate fails. I'll do that tomorrow so I take no further risks. I do have most of them on DVDs but not all of them.

I have so little space left on C: that System Restore can't even do a back up. I'm going to take the excellent advice and delete some more of the recent backups and try to kill what I thought I had killed.

Thank you so much for the help.

Judi Happy

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Here I ...
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / February 9, 2013 11:39 PM PST
In reply to: Just noting also

Here I'll have my system running nice then turn off then turn system restore back on. If you have history with system restore it is just like Microsoft's usual efforts and needs a fresh start from time to time. If all is well, now's the time to give it a fresh start.

If space is that critical, take a look at CCLEANER. It's disk cleanup in it's stock form cleans off some space that folk rarely know about.
Bob

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Here I....
by jstifel / February 12, 2013 3:12 AM PST
In reply to: Here I ...

Thanks Bob.

Yes, I use CCleaner all the time and have used it continually as I've been uninstalling programs and deleting files..and then I've been defragging to see if I can get more space. I've only got about a little more than a gig. I know it's the darn Microsoft updates because I've had the same programs on my computer for years and have had plenty of space.. And now I've moved over all of my personal directories, documents, videos, music, and graphics and it's hardly made any real difference.. And I've also deleted all of the restore points, run CCleaner, and defragged again.. Still I think it's the Microsoft updates taking up all the space. I wish I could afford to get a larger hard drive and migrate all of this stuff over to it.. That's the best way to handle this.

Judi Happy

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Defragging does not reclaim space.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / February 12, 2013 3:18 AM PST
In reply to: Here I....
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Here I
by jstifel / February 13, 2013 8:54 AM PST

Thanks Bob for the really good resources list in Google.

Judi Happy

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Filled C: drive
by robroyzz / February 10, 2013 3:45 AM PST
In reply to: Just noting also

I have 5 external USB HDDs and 3 internal HDDs I have to watch my C: drive for free space. It fills up quickly. I download and install many apps (most free) so I try to move the downloads to one of my external drives with lots of free space and install from there so it doesn't get installed in the C:\Program Files (CPF) folder. Once in a while a program to be installed doesn't give me a chance to not load into CPF which is unfortunate.
I also removed C: from paging and do the paging on 1 internal Sata drive and 1 fast external drive. This save the C: drive from lots of file movements.
Keep a watch with my Ashampoo HDD Control 2 program. It watches many of my disks (3 internal and 1 external) for temperature and error reports. Because of temp rises I had to add additional fans (from old pcs) to keep C: and the external drive cool.

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Filled C: drive
by jstifel / February 12, 2013 3:19 AM PST
In reply to: Filled C: drive

It sounds like good preventative medicine. Good for you. I'll no doubt have to get a larger hard drive but can't afford it right now. I even moved the I386 cab over to my Seagate external drive trying to save space. I'm going to look to see if I can set the Restore function to save over to the Seagate.. Probably not, but I"m gong to take a look at that.

Next, I need to put the backup files on DVD's.. I have most of my C: content already on DVD's but want to make sure that they are all there. You can't trust anything being safe without two backups on different media.

Thanks

Judi Happy

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