Cameras forum

General discussion

Can I leave my camera in the car all the time ?

by dwightb / January 6, 2007 12:42 AM PST

I like to have my camera with me at all times. Pictures don't just happen at home.
I own a Nikon D80 and I would like to keep it in the car so I will have access to it at any time, no matter where I am.
I live in the Detroit area so it does not get extremely hot or extremely cold.

Thanks in advance for any advice.

Dwight.

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I'm more worried about theft....
by whizkid454 / January 6, 2007 3:41 AM PST

Be careful if you do. Keep it hidden.

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I like to keep mine with me also. You might want to
by Kiddpeat / January 6, 2007 3:52 AM PST

check the owner's manual for temperature limits. It is common for companies to caution about condensation if the camera is moved between temperature extremes.

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The problem with keeping my camera in the car with me.
by dwightb / January 10, 2007 5:42 AM PST

I kept my camera with me in the car for several days BUT when I brought the camera into the house to take some pictures, the lens fogged over immediately.

Dwight

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Bringing camera into a warm room.
by snapshot2 Forum moderator / January 10, 2007 7:32 AM PST

I keep a digital camera in my truck all the time.
It is in a leather bag.
If the weather is cold and damp outside, you can bring the camera into the house, but do not take it out of the leather bag for several hours.

My only worry was the high temperatures that we have in the summer.
The camera is in an armrest compartment and not in direct sun.
But it gets hot enough inside the truck to kill children and pets that are left inside. Which unfortunately happens to several people every summer around this part of Texas.

If you leave an unattended child or pet in a locked car in the summer, you will likely come back to find a policeman and a broken car window. People will report it to the police immediately.

So far .... it has not killed the camera.

For my more expensive camera, it stays in the house in a small insulated box. When it goes into the car.....so does the insulated box.

...
..
.

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Leave it in the car
by MoeFugger / January 11, 2007 7:18 PM PST

Yep those photos happen outside alright.
I have left mine in the truck for years and am in north Florida. Not any cold winters but but we have those hot killer summers. My camera has held up just fine. It stays below the dash console way out of the sun.
Cannon Powershot A 40.

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Moe
by dwightb / January 12, 2007 12:07 AM PST
In reply to: Leave it in the car

Thanks for your reply.

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Keeping a camera in a car
by Derek R / January 11, 2007 7:48 PM PST

Your biggest problem, apart from theft, will be condensation. This caused by temperatures having different Dew Points. This is a complicated subject as at the same percentage humidity of say 70% at 25 degrees C the air will be holding far more water than at 5 degrees C at 70%. The same principle would apply at say minus 25 & minus 5, so the temperature difference in more important than the actual temperature. This is a very simplisitc explanation, as under certain rarer conditions the reverse could be true. It does not help if you are using air con in the car. It could help if you kept the camera in an air tight freezer bag and then wrapt this in a piece of old blanket. Going from a higher temperature to lower, generally speaking, should not be a problem, going from lower to higher you should leave the camera in the air tight bag for approx 10 minutes, near to some heat souce if possible. Placing on a warm car bonnet or in the sun will suffice outdoors, in the region of a radiator when going indoor will be OK. I sometimes run a hair drier over my camera, at a low setting and at a distance, when bringing it back into the house, maybe a cheap one working off the cigarette plug would be an idea. Condesation, Dew points and temperature are interactive making the subject very complicated. As a rule of thumb hot to cold OK, cold to hot beware

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Derek
by dwightb / January 12, 2007 12:10 AM PST

Thanks for the info - it certainly covers a lot of questions.

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Car Temperature can damage your camera.
by ralphddc / January 11, 2007 9:48 PM PST

From my personal experience, I would avoid leaving my digital camera in a vehicle. Besides theft, the other major issue is temperature. Apparently, the lubricants used for the mechanism that allows lense movement can thin under the high temperature levels in a vehicle, causing the lense to stick. My camera developed this problem and I have to pay about $180.00 for a repair. (I since have purchased a ew camera) Once the moving parts are without the proper lubrication damage will occur.

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Ralph
by dwightb / January 12, 2007 12:13 AM PST

Good stuff - Thanks.

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Leaving a digital camera in the car.
by wolfman57 / January 11, 2007 10:08 PM PST

First off.. Do you have a garage? This will help in answering your question from the factor of being stolen or humidity. I reside in Canton, OH with similar weather conditions to Detroit.. I do not leave my camera in the car although I have a very large three car garage that is heated. However, my opinion is that leaving a camera in the car given my circumstance would not be a problem.

Heat/cold condensation is the real killer on the circuit board of any electronic device due to corrosion. You be the judge as you know your circumstance. If you do not have a garage, then forget about keeping it in the car......

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wolfman57
by dwightb / January 12, 2007 12:17 AM PST

Tahks for your reply.

The verdict is in.

The camera will be in the house and taken out only when it's required.

Thanks everyone.

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Leave Camera in Car?
by HD1080p / January 11, 2007 11:57 PM PST

Yes of course you can. Especially if you want to have it stolen.

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Oh yee of little faith.
by dwightb / January 12, 2007 12:02 AM PST
In reply to: Leave Camera in Car?

Actually I was looking for an answer a little more technical.

But thanks for your concern.

Dwight.

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Another option!
by Baper / January 12, 2007 6:24 AM PST

A small leather case is available for most of these pocket size cameras which you can fasten to your belt. They are about the size of a cell phone and easy to extract from the case. I don't carry mine all the time but I wear it if I think there is a chance of getting a picture.

Baper

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I wouldn't recommend leaving a digital camera in your car
by Danni Sarena / January 12, 2007 5:49 AM PST

I used to leave my digital camera (Sony Cybershot) in my car all the time, but one day the heat stuffed up the CCD in the camera. I was able to get it repaired under warranty, but I was without a camera for 8 weeks, and the camera has never been 100% perfect since. I looked on the internet, and the problem was reported in most major brands of digital camera.

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What about the LCD?
by BowerR64 / January 12, 2007 6:22 AM PST

What does LCD mean?

Can it freeze?

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CCD, Not LCD
by Danni Sarena / January 12, 2007 6:36 AM PST
In reply to: What about the LCD?

The CCD (can't remember what it stands for) is the bit inside the camera where the pictures are formed. I imagine it is a bit like the film in a traditional camera. My camera's symptoms were colours being wrong. It started as whites showing as pale purple and got steadily worse over a couple of months until the pictures were unrecognisable.

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CCD defined
by excelguru / January 17, 2007 3:51 AM PST
In reply to: CCD, Not LCD

CCD = Charge Coupled Device

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Can I leave my camera in the car
by rick09 / January 12, 2007 2:02 PM PST

No you should not leave your camera in the car If it gets to hot in the car it will melt the lens But if you have to leave yourcamera in the car be sure to leave it under the front seat this is the best location to protect your camera Rick Collin Burlington Ontario

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My guess is that a Nikon D80 is probably using a glass lense
by Kiddpeat / January 12, 2007 3:34 PM PST

Cars don't get hot enough to melt glass although it seems like that at times.

Wink

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No not the CCD the LCD
by BowerR64 / January 12, 2007 5:58 PM PST

I thought LCD (the display) ment LIQUID crystal display. SO my question was cant liquid freeze? or is it a type of liquid that will not freeze if left in freezing temps?

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Rick09 was not responding to your question, and I responded
by Kiddpeat / January 12, 2007 11:08 PM PST
In reply to: No not the CCD the LCD
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(NT) No.
by Ryo Hazuki / January 17, 2007 1:36 AM PST
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