Camcorders forum

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Can a lithium ion battery be overcharged?

by doowopper / January 14, 2005 8:25 PM PST

Recently I bought a SONY DCR-HC40 camcorder, the SONY BC-TRP charger and an extra SONY NP-FP70 lithium ion battery pack (quick charge battery). I charged the battery that came with the camcorder (NP-FP50) in the SONY BC-TRP charger and, by mistake left the battery in the plugged in charger overnight.
1) Is it possible to overcharge a lithium ion battery by leaving it in the plugged in charger overnight, as I did?
2) According to the instructions for the charger, I can leave the battery in the charger for an hour after the charge light goes out (indicating a full charge) and the battery will charge even more. Are there any disadvantages in doing that?
Thanks.
Richard

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Yes.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / January 14, 2005 11:58 PM PST

But a proper charger will not do that.

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Yes, but....
by doowopper / January 15, 2005 7:09 PM PST
In reply to: Yes.

Thanks for your response.
1) My lithium ion battery is the SONY NP-FP70 Battery Pack. Does the fact that the battery is called a battery pack mean that it has built in circuitry to prevent an overcharge?
2) Is there any way of knowing if my SONY BC-TRP charger has the circuitry for preventing an overcharge?
3) If I charge my battery in my camcorder (SONY DCR-HC40), can I assume it has the built in circuitry to prevent an overcharge?
Thanks again.
Richard

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Not so fast...
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / January 15, 2005 10:14 PM PST
In reply to: Yes, but....

1) My lithium ion battery is the SONY NP-FP70 Battery Pack. Does the fact that the battery is called a battery pack mean that it has built in circuitry to prevent an overcharge?

No. I write with some authority since I've dissected too many and there is no such circuit in the battery. From a system perspective it doesn't belong there.

2) Is there any way of knowing if my SONY BC-TRP charger has the circuitry for preventing an overcharge?

You'll have to ask, but the key clues are:

a. The documention tells you to not leave it plugged in overnight.
b. The battery gets too hot and melts the plastic.

3) If I charge my battery in my camcorder (SONY DCR-HC40), can I assume it has the built in circuitry to prevent an overcharge?

a. One can't assume anything.
b. But from what I read on that model, you plug it in and forget about it. To do that, it would have a proper charge circuit.

Bob

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