Windows Legacy OS forum

Question

Can a 9 yr old computer die? or just the OS?

by sawdustred / March 18, 2013 3:29 AM PDT

I read everywhere that an old computer (HP Pavilion) should be replaced and will eventually die. I also read that you can revive and remove problems if you replace old XP with something newer like Windows 7. And I read that you can revive computer by replacing hard drive/disk.
I am not a techie - can someone provide info on all of the above? Don't want to buy new desk top but have Windows 7 to install if that is the way to go. What started my questions is that (rarely) it will lose connection but also read that could be overheating or simple problems, not too serious and not fatal. Thanks.

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All Answers

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Answer
I have to disagree.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / March 18, 2013 3:37 AM PDT

It is possible that an OS gets damaged enough over time that it may not boot and run.

But there is BASIC MAINTENANCE that folk seem to never do that can help extend the life of the PC. Installing the OS is sadly not going to correct for dried out heatsink compound, failed fan or clogged heatsinks. Here's a prior discussion about this.
http://forums.cnet.com/7723-6122_102-569818/getting-ready-to/?tag=contentBody;threadListing

Yes it may die but most of the time I find the owner not able to tell me what canned air is.
Bob

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Is this what you are talking about?
by sawdustred / March 18, 2013 8:20 AM PDT
In reply to: I have to disagree.
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That's a good start.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / March 18, 2013 8:43 AM PDT

As to life span, today's machines are about 5 year design life but that does not mean you can get computers that go for decades. In the case of Windows, most folk will upgrade or move on. However upgrading is sometimes too hard for some. A 9 year old PC might be some IDE type drive and those are getting harder to find at times.

Bob

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Problems With Installing Win7 On Old Computer
by Grif Thomas Forum moderator / March 18, 2013 11:31 AM PDT
In reply to: I have to disagree.

First, at some point, it becomes impossible to find hardware drivers for old hardware which support Windows 7. Things like video & audio cards, chipset and BIOS software, go out of style and the manufacturers simply quit updating drivers for old hardware which is almost non-existent.. If no drivers, then the operating system and computer won't work.. Installing Win7 on a 9 year old machine is probably a no-go.

In addition, eventually mechanical parts stop working.. Motherboards only take so much heat and they die.. Processors, the same thing.. Hard drive's too.

Although it can technically be possible to replace most of those items and continue reinstalling the original operating system and software, eventually, Microsoft will also stop supporting the operating system.. (Windows XP will no longer receive security updates in 2014, or so says Microsoft.)

Hope this helps.

Grif

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I type this with my 9 year old dell
by budbd / March 23, 2013 2:16 PM PDT

I am typing this with my 9 yearl old dell dimension 4600 win xp home, though, not all of it is nine years old, I have a higher end 450W power supply I put in, I bought a new computer in November, so I upgraded to 2.5 gig memory and noticed my dial up was working better before I switchd that off in favor of my newer cable company high speed, and I replaced the hard drive to a 160 gig hard drive, could have put in a bigger drive, but unnecessary.

Actually, gettting this thing on high speed was a chore, couldn't figure out why it wouldn't recognize a connection, did a f2 setup to tell it to recognize network adaptor, then still wouldn't work, seems I couldn't still, after hours of fiddling with it, some sort of driver was installed, maybe ethernet diagnostics.

What I figured out is that video is choppy with most videos over the new computer, likely the video card, built in to the motherboard, it is obsolete for true un choppy video. Unsure if I want to put some sort of video card in this, its always best to have a backup, and my new computer gives me troubles, may need a tech in town to look it over to make sure there isn't something wrong, though I like to fix things myself.

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Not With Win7 On It Though...
by Grif Thomas Forum moderator / March 24, 2013 6:03 AM PDT

...which is the primary question the original poster had.. Yep, leaving WinXP on the computer, replacing worn-out parts, IF you can find drivers for updated hardware, will extend the life of the machine, but you'll eventually have to live with Microsofts' lack of support for XP.

Good job & take care.

Grif

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