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Best way to back up data stored on a notebook is?

by Big Steve / January 13, 2007 4:29 PM PST

I posted a question in the "Storage" forum which was how best to go about backing up Quicken data on a notebook. I got no hits to my post so I'll post here.

I have had a new Dell Inspiron 1300 notebook computer for almost a year now which I have used primarily for web surfing and email. A few days ago I purchased and installed Quicken Basic 2007 on the notebook.

I'm now asked everytime I exit Quicken if I want to back up my data. I would like to if I knew the best way to do so. For years I have backed up my Quicken data on an old desktop PC using floppies.

This notebook has no floppy drive. I could purchase an external floppy drive and back up my data but isn't there an easier way to back up the data or any similar data on a notebook if no floppy drive exists on the notebook? Feedback welcomed.


Big Steve
Biloxi, Mississippi
01/14/07

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I assume your laptop has a recordable CD/DVD drive?
by Paul C / January 13, 2007 7:00 PM PST

If so, the answer's easy: When Quicken asks you to backup the data, reply "Yes". Save it to the hard drive in a folder you can easily identify. Then, using a program that allows packet writing, copy it to a CD/DVD. An explanation of packet writing can be found at http://pages.prodigy.net/jdjd/cdr/packet.htm .

Note that this solution may not suit you, as the resulting CD/DVD will probably be unreadable on other PC's - a problem if the laptop is stolen, damaged or otherwise unusable, unless you have the same software on another PC (desktop?). The external floppy drive may be the best solution, or you might look into the possibility of connecting the laptop to a desktop and transferring these files to the desktop's hard drive. In any event, I'd make a CD/DVD/floppy of these files that I'd store away from the PC - your office, maybe? This data must be retrievable in the event of a disaster.

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(NT) Use a USB portable drive
by glb613 / January 13, 2007 7:59 PM PST
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You have the option
by PudgyOne / January 13, 2007 8:22 PM PST

to back-up the file, anywhere you choose, it does NOT have to be a floppy.

Go to your preferences and change it to where you want to back it up to.

I would prefer to back it up to a Flash Drive. Each person has their preferences.


Rick

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Flash drive
by phil66 / January 13, 2007 9:33 PM PST
In reply to: You have the option

Hi Rick

I have a new Dell xps 600 Desktop w/Window xp sp2 and all the usb ports necessary for using a flash drive.

I have never used a flash drive and all google tell how to use but not what to use.

I need to transport updates of different programs to a friends house I am now using cd's but would like to try flash drives.

So many different brand names and sizes and price range gets confusing when trying to determine which to buy.

Would you recommend something for a beginner to evaluate and then make decision if I want to continue using. Also I have front usb ports should I buy an extension or just use directly from front ports.

One more question If i download Quicken data and other programs when updating Quicken will I lose other data.

Thanks in advance for the help
Ray

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Re: flash drive
by Kees Bakker / January 13, 2007 10:08 PM PST
In reply to: Flash drive

Ray,

You can consider a flash drive as just a BIG diskette. Just use My Computer or Windows Explorer to copy files to and from it, and delete files from it. Plug it in any USB port and go ahead.
One thing to note: use the icon in the systray to prepare it for a 'Safe Removal' or the contents might be corrupted.

In essence, they are all the same. Choose one with a big enough size, they vary from 128 Mb to 1 Gb. I've got one with a cord attached, so I can carry it around my neck (which I never do), but it sure helps to find it when I forgot where I put it. It's a Sandisk, which is a reputable maker, but it's not advanced technology, so I don't think the make really matters.

I don't understand your question about Quicken data and other programs.

Kees

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Ray
by PudgyOne / January 14, 2007 5:08 AM PST
In reply to: Flash drive

Like Kees said, a Flash Drive is like carrying a big floppy around.

I have a 2 gig and use it to transfer programs files and to back up my checking account, I no longer use a checkbook register.

1 or 2 gig would be what I would look for. Look at Office Max, they're usually on sale there. I first purchased on on eBay. Worked for a while but, I was going from Linux to Windows. Eventually it crapped out because Windows couldn't recognize it and neither could Linux.

A 2 gig will hould more that burning ti to a CD.


Rick

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Thanks Rick And Kees
by phil66 / January 14, 2007 5:36 AM PST
In reply to: Ray

located a sandisk on Office max in 1gb size.

Having an unusual ice storm for east texas next few days

After that passes will purchase one and work with it.

Again thanks for the info

Ray

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As most of the others indicated...
by Edward ODaniel / January 14, 2007 1:29 AM PST

a flash drive would be a goog choice, ESPECIALLY if coupled with also copying the backed up data file to a CD.

I would avoid using packet writing software (makes the CD like a big floppy) because there are problems with packet writing that can sometimes just make the data "disappear". I prefer to simply use CD-RW disks like CD-R then erase and write again as necessary.

Since you are specifically asking about backing up Quicken data however, you might find it well worth your time to follow this link to the Quicken Support Forum for "Backing up, converting and managing your Quicken files".
http://www.quickenforums.com/forum.jspa?forumID=1004

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Re: As most of the others indicated...
by Big Steve / January 14, 2007 1:57 AM PST

Thanks everyone for your information.


Big Steve
Biloxi, Mississippi
01/14/07

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Here they are
by Willy / January 14, 2007 2:01 AM PST

Here are your back-up options provided you have access to such ports and/or devices:

1) CD/DVD drive
2) flash drive
3) ext. hard drive
4) floppies
5) network storage
6) online storage service

I prefer CD/DVD as a back-up and is common now and can be carried to other systems on demand. Your choice...

tada -----Willy Happy

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Re: Here they are
by Big Steve / January 14, 2007 2:22 AM PST
In reply to: Here they are

Why I asked is because I have an old desktop PC with an older version of Quicken; Quicken Basic 2001. This older desktop PC doesn't have a CD burner or a DVD burner nor does it come equipped with any USB ports; it's an old computer but it does have a floppy drive. I have quite a bit of Quicken data stored on that old computer which takes me about 20 minutes to back up. It takes 22 floppies to back up my data.

I have no intentions of storing that much data on the Dell notebook and yes; the Dell Inspiron 1300 notebook which was given to me last April 2006 as a gift does have a CD burner/DVD ROM combo drive; several USB ports; an 80GB HD and 512MB memory but no floppy drive.

I'd like to use the easiest; safest way to back up the Quicken data on the Dell notebook and if that means purchasing an external floppy drive I'll do that. What's a good brand of external floppy drive to consider? Thanks for your post.


Big Steve
Biloxi, Mississippi
01/14/07

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In your specific case it might be easier to simply...
by Edward ODaniel / January 14, 2007 2:27 AM PST
In reply to: Re: Here they are

connect the old laptop to the new computer VIA serial or parallel port to transfer the data OR, if you have Win 98 on the old laptop and do have a PCMCIA slot you can get a PCCard USB connection for the old laptop which would give you access to the larger and faster external storage options.

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Re: In your specific case it might be easier to simply...
by Big Steve / January 14, 2007 2:56 AM PST

First; the notebook that I have is a new notebook; it will be a year old in April 2007; second I'm not concerned about transferring the older Quicken data that I have stored on my old desktop PC to the new Dell notebook.

I'm simply concerned about the best way to go about backing up the new Quicken data on the new Dell notebook; that's the data I'm concerned about being able to back up now. I don't want to have to use the old desktop PC to back up the new Quicken data that is being entered into the new Dell notebook.

I guess if I want to use floppies to back up the new Quicken data that I'm entering into the new Dell notebook I'll have to go buy an external floppy drive. Sorry if I failed to make that clear. Thanks for your post.


Big Steve
Biloxi, Mississippi
01/14/07

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Don't use floppies!
by Kees Bakker / January 14, 2007 4:30 AM PST

They are slow and unreliable. I suggest a usb-stick. A small capacity one (128 Mb) surely is cheaper than an external diskette drive, and MUCH more convenient. In fact, bestbuy currently has a 1 Gb type on sale for $ 19.99 (search for flash drive or memory stick) in stead of the regular $40. While their external floppy drive is $56.99 without the media.

If there's more you want to backup than a Gb, I suggest an external (UBS) harddrive. I just bought a 320 Gb one for 120 euro (= 150 USD).

Hope this helps.


Kees

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Re: Don't use floppies!
by Big Steve / January 14, 2007 4:49 AM PST
In reply to: Don't use floppies!

So what you're recommending is; forgive me for my techno lango; a gizzmo that you simply stick in one of the USB ports on my Dell notebook and simply back up my Quicken data that way? That sounds more like it.

I prefer to keep things simple since I don't plan to put much data into the Quicken on the Dell notebook. I'll check that item out at Best Buy. What you're recommending can I purchase the item from Office Depot; Circuit City; New Egg or other computer supply type vendors? Thanks for the post.


Big Steve
Biloxi, Mississippi
01/14/07

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Backing up Quicken from Laptop
by WinifredWright / May 1, 2008 2:44 AM PDT
In reply to: Don't use floppies!

I note several people advised backing up the quicken dats on your laptop to a flash drive. You CANNOT backup quicken to a flash drive. It just won't work. I found the answer as to why it won't work on the internet once but have forgotten now the reason given.

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Sorry for any misunderrstanding but...
by Edward ODaniel / January 14, 2007 4:54 AM PST

your statement:

Why I asked is because I have an old desktop PC with an older version of Quicken; Quicken Basic 2001. This older desktop PC doesn't have a CD burner or a DVD burner nor does it come equipped with any USB ports; it's an old computer but it does have a floppy drive. I have quite a bit of Quicken data stored on that old computer which takes me about 20 minutes to back up. It takes 22 floppies to back up my data.

certainly makes it appear that your concern was backing up the old data on the old laptop.

If you are only concerned about data on the new laptop then a flash drive is the way to go as you would soon discover that Windows XP is not so forgiving when a floppy starts developing minor problems and will soon present you with a Cyclic redundancy error bit NO DATA on the floppy.

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Re: Sorry for any misunderrstanding but...
by Big Steve / January 14, 2007 5:58 AM PST

Your comments in your last paragraph are what I want to do so I need to purchase a "flash drive". Thanks for your post.


Big Steve
Biloxi, Mississippi
01/14/07

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Review
by Willy / January 14, 2007 3:42 AM PST
In reply to: Re: Here they are

One reason, I started my reply as follows: "Here are your back-up options provided you have access to such ports and/or devices"

If i recall all you mentioned was you had an old pc, not what was available in storage, thus my list. What maybe easy and the fix/solution could be more than a simple matter. You can try a small network i/f if ethernet is available on both systems or serial type/parallel, but then you need some sort of cabling. You can install a USB card in order to make the older system capable of USB port(s). All in all not an easy solution. I offer you get your data and zip them(compress) in large file that a floppy can handle or use s/w chopping pgm. that you zip a very large file, then chop them in pt1, pt2, etc. for floppy xfer.

Last, for FYI most ext. floppy drives now available use a USB port to access the system anything is too old and expensive.

tada -----Willy Happy

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Re: Review
by Big Steve / January 14, 2007 11:35 AM PST
In reply to: Review

I've just re-read all 19 posts to my thread and if I'm correct everyone basically recommended backing up my Quicken data by either a CDRW or by flash drive; a 1GB flash drive. Like someone else posted in this thread I went to Best Buy's website and there were so many flash drives available.

If I choose to back up the Quicken data by CD; which kind of blank CD's do I need to buy and have on hand to begin backing up my data? Will that work like using floppies in the past? I start out with the first CD; the next time I'm prompted to back up my Quicken simply insert the same CD into the CD drive?

In backing up my Quicken data will I be prompted later to insert a second CD if I max out the space on the first CD similar to like backing up data on a floppy? Quicken would prompt me to insert another floppy to continue backing up my data. Will doing it using CD's work similarly except I'll be able to store more data on a CD?


Big Steve
Biloxi, Mississippi
01/14/07

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Re: backup
by Kees Bakker / January 14, 2007 4:47 PM PST
In reply to: Re: Review

Steve,

What you didn't state yet: the volume (amount of data) you want to backup. If it's 22 floppies I assume it's some 35 Mb, which isn't much. A flash drive is 128 Mb to 2 gb (depending on the type), a CD-RW is 800 Mb (but of course you can use many different ones in the same drive).

Flash drive:
Any flash drive from any shop is acceptable. Choose one you feel comfortable with. Rellay not important which one you buy at which shop. The whole operation (insert stick, copy, safe removal) takes less than a minute. The copying itself only a few seconds.

CD:
Buy CD-RW (rewritable), which is reusable. Better than CD-R (which is for one-time use, so better suited for archiving). The drive should come with a burning program (like Nero Express), or download free CDBURNERXP. Then use that burning program to burn the data you want (up to 700 Mb) to the CD. It's recommended to have a few CD-RW-disks, which you in turn, so you've always the latest 2 or 3 backups at hand.
If you've got more than 700 Mb, you manually divide in portions of less than 700 Mb. The easiest way is to organize your data so that every folder is less than 700 Mb, so you can backup folder by folder.

The burning process of 35 Mb will take you less than 5 minutes. It's definitely takes much more time than simply copying to a USB-stick.

If you feel like you will have more than 700 Mb to backup, consider to buy a DVD-burner. They go up to 4.7 Gb, double layer even to 8 Gb. Like CD, there's a rewritable version and a one-time version.
When you've come here, you'll be VERY happy that you don't use floppies anymore. After all, 8 Gb = 5000 floppies.

Hope this helps.


Kees

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Re: backup
by Big Steve / January 14, 2007 5:16 PM PST
In reply to: Re: backup

The 22 floppies I mentioned in a previous post is the amount of Quicken data I presently have stored on an old WIN 95 desktop PC which I continue to back up using floppies of course.

The new Quicken data which I started entering into my Dell notebook just last week after I purchased a copy of Quicken Basic 2007 is the data I want to begin backing up. As I mentioned in a previous post I don't intend to enter 22 floppies worth of data on the new Dell notebook.

I just wanted to know the best and easiest way I could begin to back up my new Quicken data as I continue to enter it into the new Dell notebook computer. The old WIN 95 desktop PC which has Quicken Basic 2001 will have the Quicken data backed up using floppies since that old desktop PC doesn't have any USB ports or a CD burner; it just has a floppy drive.


Big Steve
Biloxi, Mississippi
01/15/07

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Re: backup
by Big Steve / January 14, 2007 5:32 PM PST
In reply to: Re: backup

I was considering purchasing an external floppy drive to back up the new Quicken data onto the new Dell notebook but someone suggested in an earlier post that I shouldn't do that.

I should instead use either a flash drive or back up the Quicken data onto a CD since the Dell notebook does have a CD burner/DVD ROM combo drive. The flash drive sounds like it would be the easier way to go in backing up the new Quicken data.

Someone else posted to get a Sandisk(sp?) brand of flash drive; 1GB capacity. I believe that's what a previous poster said; that I should buy a 1GB flash drive and use that to back up my Quicken data on the Dell notebook.


Big Steve
Biloxi, Mississippi
01/15/07

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Go forth...
by Willy / January 15, 2007 12:55 AM PST
In reply to: Re: backup

If you use CD/DVD burner, then you need to know that it uses in -/+ R blanks disks. the specs of the CD drive will be explained by the manual or support website. However, some drives can access either one, if that's the case buy whatever you feel best.

The flash drive, again there are many out there. Often enough they're on sale too. I suggest buy a namebrand if you plan to use it alot. Once, you get the hang of it you'll wonder why you didn't do this before. I suggest Memorex, SanDisk, Kingston and Crucial. There are no-name brands out there at great reduced cost but I found some are iffy on the long haul, but for short periods they may work great quite well. 512kb and 1gb size is very common and if you can afford it, 2gb and 4gb are available and you may want to look at U3 type flash drives as yet more capablities.

tada -----Willy Happy

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Re: Go forth...
by Big Steve / January 15, 2007 1:10 AM PST
In reply to: Go forth...

Thanks for the post. A 1GB "flash" drive by Sandisk would be a good brand to consider? I'll do some price checking. Let me ask you another question.

Is there a website I can go to; enter in Sandisk 1GB flash drive and the website will list several other websites that carry the item as well as also list the current prices each website is selling the item for?


Big Steve
Biloxi, Mississippi
01/15/07

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Yes there is and here one of them is...
by Edward ODaniel / January 16, 2007 5:38 AM PST
In reply to: Re: Go forth...
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Re: Yes there is and here one of them is...
by Big Steve / January 16, 2007 5:45 AM PST

Thanks for posting those links.


Big Steve
Biloxi, Mississippi
01/16/07

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External USB Drive
by LsuEduMsn / January 15, 2007 9:32 AM PST

No one backs up daily or weekly to a CD drive.
Nor a flash drive.
Nor to anything they have to go through a few clicks and remember to backup.

Everyone who backs up sets it up automatic. To an external USB HD. They are only $50 to $75.

Microsoft Live OneCare will back up all of the DATA files daily or weekly - all automatic - to an external USB drive.

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Not Quite Correct...
by Grif Thomas Forum moderator / January 15, 2007 9:51 AM PST
In reply to: External USB Drive

As the system admin of a government agency LAN, I make SURE that each of our users backup their data to CD/DVD or flash drive EVERY DAY or at least when one day's worth of input has been created... It's part of the users work duties.. We don't use external hard drives and in some cases, if the data for a single day was lost, it would involve 8 hours of rehashing the same work again..

Hope this helps.

Grif

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Avg Home User
by LsuEduMsn / January 15, 2007 10:00 AM PST
In reply to: Not Quite Correct...

The Gov Agcy is a typical user's home setup ?

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