TVs & Home Theaters forum

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Best viewing height for a TV Stand

by RLVampire / June 19, 2006 7:08 AM PDT

we will soon be purchasing a new TV-probably an LCD on the smallish side, 32" or a little bit more,-- what would be an ideal height of a TV stand for good viewing?

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The center of the screen should be at or a little below,,
by jcrobso / June 19, 2006 7:25 AM PDT

eye level for the easest viewing. John

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I AGREE....HOWEVER, IF YOU'RE BUYING FOR THE LONG........
by Riverledge / June 19, 2006 10:40 AM PDT

TERM you should consider a 40" - 42" model; if you have the space. Think you'd be happier longer.

river.

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Let me differ just a tad. . .
by Coryphaeus / June 19, 2006 12:51 PM PDT

The recommended height is just above eye level for those sitting down. Flat screens "sweet spot" is at or just below center. It also gives a little better viewing angle for those standing.

But then, again, whatever fits your room or your taste.

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its like asking "whats the best shoe size"
by masterying01 / June 19, 2006 12:17 PM PDT

i really dont have an exact answer to this because its mostly an opinion. it is best to have it eye level...but....

different lcd's will have different heights. also some couches are really really soft while others are really really hard. there is a lot more things to consider. most tv stands are around 18-22inches. you can find shorter or higher ones depending on how much u want to spend.

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Tv stand viewing height
by RLVampire / June 20, 2006 8:13 AM PDT

I actually found a unique unfinished oak corner unit that measures 24" high- it supposedly fits up to a 46" unit- think this may be okay- what do you think?

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Depends on the number and age of kids
by Blasturd / July 5, 2006 4:47 AM PDT

I had to go a little higher than the TV stands available today. My toddler likes to poke at things, so I had to go a little higher than normal. I had an antique table with folding leafs that was perfect for the job. In fact, the height was perfect for our viewing area, and will probably keep it that high forever. And, my center channel speaker was a full size speaker with 15" woofer and large horn tweeter, and it fit perfectly under the table. The kid can just barely reach the power button. He's usually up first thing in the morning, and turns on the entertainment center right away waiting for cartoons!

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