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Average cost for Taking Computer to a Tech for Reformatting?

by JimiHendrix88 / January 24, 2005 4:46 AM PST

What's the average cost for taking a computer to a Computer tech business that reformat's people's computer's?

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Don't even think about paying
by Ray Harinec / January 24, 2005 5:05 AM PST

stick around here and you'll do it free. Give a little time to get a number of responses and use what one you like the most. Definitely add your system info to your other thread.

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$75 and higher PLUS you won't
by TONI H / January 24, 2005 6:52 AM PST

get any disks from those vendors for anything they have installed because you are expected to have your own, which you don't have.

You can't format a drive without a new installation disk for windows, and if you say you don't have the restore disk from your original vendor, you will have to buy a version of windows. W95 is no longer available, W98 will be tough to locate but can still be found (your local repair shop might even give/sell you an OEM copy if you know them pretty well), don't waste money on ME because it's a real piece of trash version, and XP probably won't work on an old W95 system without major overhauls to the hardware in that computer.

TONI

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400 US Bucks.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / January 24, 2005 9:11 AM PST

That's the last price I got locally.

I feel it's a find skill you should have.

BTW, it's technically inaccurate to call it "formatting". I can format a machine with a boot disk automatically and it will cost nothing. But to load the OS proper is not "formatting" but usually what a person really wanted.

Bob

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(NT) (NT) Dang Bob $400, and I thought Plumbers were flushers:-)
by John Robie / January 24, 2005 9:48 AM PST
In reply to: 400 US Bucks.
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$400 Dollars Mass.money..
by SumerBrez / January 25, 2005 9:07 AM PST
In reply to: 400 US Bucks.

In Va.you can buy a new PC for $500 (HP and Dell)...and reinstall windows for $65.
Sorry to hear about the bad weather conditions there..
Hope all is ok..Stay safe.
SumerBrez

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Reformatting
by Dobby / January 24, 2005 3:51 PM PST

Piece of cake to do it yourself...all you need is the setup disk of the operating system you want to install!

Just place it in CDRom drive, and follow instructions; but, remember to delete old harddrive partition, and create new one, before formatting! Good luck!

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Dpobby, did you miss the fact
by Ray Harinec / January 25, 2005 2:02 AM PST
In reply to: Reformatting

that his system is a proprietary system, thus all his drivers and maybe his access to the BIOS is on a partiton that he can't acces without the restore CD?

Reformatting will wipe out that partiton and all info on it.

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Proprietary System
by Dobby / January 25, 2005 4:03 AM PST

Ray...Don't remember that fact being mentioned, but he still should be able to install OS from setup disk...only problem would be if CDRom driver is not installed...then, would have to use floppy to install generic one.

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Where does he get his
by Ray Harinec / January 25, 2005 10:34 AM PST
In reply to: Proprietary System

drivers for the mobo, for the video, for the sound, et al????

He already said that he doesn't have the recovery disk.

If he would read the instructions from Toni Hackler, in advance, he has a chance.

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formatting
by Dobby / January 25, 2005 12:33 PM PST
In reply to: Where does he get his

You people are making this sound more difficult than it is! I have NEVER used a recovery disk, and have formatted my share of harddrives...all you need to install OS is a setup disk...and, on some older machines a bootdisk floppy, with generic CDRom drivers on it! Once windows is installed, it will install generic video and sound drivers, to get you up and running...then, once online, you can update drivers for particular cards installed.

Anyone not having a windows 98 startup disk containing CDRom drivers, LMK and I will send you contents in a zipfile, that you can open and transfer to a floppy...then you can install OS with setup CD. Newer OS's should have no need for floppy, only setup CD.

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With Proprietary systems, it may not be that easy
by TONI H / January 25, 2005 6:48 PM PST
In reply to: formatting

without the recovery/master disks.......I've been building systems for years and the only computer I found that I could not eliminate the recovery/master disk for when attempting to do a clean format/install using separate W98 disk and all hardware drivers already downloaded and ready to use ahead of time was an IBM Amiga system. It was so proprietary to that recovery/master cd from the vendor that Windows installed just fine, but the drivers were a bear and a half to get installed. After nearly seven hours of playing with it (it was for a neighbor and being done for free fortunately), I threw in the towel and used the vendor disk.....propaganda and all......and it was up and running perfectly in less than a half hour.

Older Compaqs, PB's, and HP's were fairly easy (with Compaq's you have to have the bootdisk for that system in order to mess with repartitioning because of their bios specific crap of not getting access to it if you don't put that bios permission on the harddrive or use the floppy disk every time....but if you don't mess with the partitions, you're fine). Most times, every driver and program you needed to install could be done from their cd because they were all laid out in separate folders on the disk....but not anymore. Everything on the cd is hidden now. Give me a homebuilt with separate install disks for everything.........every time.

I guess the biggest warning I can give to anybody who has a proprietary system......they almost all come with cd burners now, so use it as soon as you bring the system home. Burn a copy of every vendor disk you got and write down the product id numbers for everything (actually, put it all into a text file and burn that file to the cd at the same time or put it on a floppy disk.....and print it out as well). Then use the COPY to do all recovery/formats with instead of the original. This way if anything ever happens to that cd, you can still burn a new copy to use and you will always have an installation disk for that system. If you get in the habit of protecting your investment right from the start, you won't be at the mercy of the vendor again later on down the road.

TONI

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proprietary
by Dobby / January 26, 2005 3:58 AM PST

I guess the biggest warning I can give to anybody who has a proprietary system......they almost all come with cd burners now, so use it as soon as you bring the system home. Burn a copy of every vendor disk you got and write down the product id numbers for everything (actually, put it all into a text file and burn that file to the cd at the same time or put it on a floppy disk.....and print it out as well). Then use the COPY to do all recovery/formats with instead of the original. This way if anything ever happens to that cd, you can still burn a new copy to use and you will always have an installation disk for that system. If you get in the habit of protecting your investment right from the start, you won't be at the mercy of the vendor again later on down the road.

------------------------------------------------------

Good advice...that's why I would not own one...give me a clone anyday! Another problem is, that sometimes these vendors don't give you the disks necessary to redo computer, if you have to...everything is "pre-installed"...a lot of good that does you, if you have to reinstall! I have copies of everything in my computers...both on external drive, and CDs.

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Average price to re-do a PC?
by Geeks / January 25, 2005 12:08 PM PST

I've always wondered that myself. Because flattening a PC and starting fresh is THE best thing; nothing can come close (in many ways it's better than buying a new PC) and everyone should go that route.

For homes, my rate has been a couple hundred dollars.. Maybe $250-$299 for more complex setups and extra requests added onto it. For businesses, the costs for them seem to add up quickly to a tune of several thousand dollars per year per PC, depending on how often they push the panic button and call for help.

For individual users' (home/home-office PC's however), that answer is probably going to vary depending on the type of end-user you're doing the janitorial services for) and your cost scale will probably be proportional to how educated/savvy the end-user is, coz your prices will want to rise for those who are more painful; and naturally lower for users whom you don't have to explain every little thing to.) What do you charge/what have you been charging?

PS)
As an anecdote, in Dec 2003, I did a google search on what companies spend per year to keep their PC's running and it was outrageous!! Schools spent the least - about $4000 per year per PC, while Fortune 1000 firms often went beyond the $10,000 per PC per year mark.. Some university in Hong Kong had reported to have spent $20,000 per PC in 2003 - probably when the DCOM/RPC thing went haywire in the Win32 arena.

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Average cost for Taking Computer to a Tech for Reformatting
by jcrobso / February 2, 2005 3:29 AM PST

FYI, when I worked at FRY's electronics it was $70 if you have a valid CD. John

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