Browsers, E-mail, & Web Apps forum

Question

Are there decent paid email services?

by Judyintexas / April 13, 2013 4:39 AM PDT

I am fed up with Hotmail (oops, Outlook) and Gmail. I feel like I need a sandbox and finger paints to go along with the new Outlook, which calls type sizes "fonts" and is the ugliest thing I have seen in awhile. I clicked on the link in a CNET message to post this question, but the new Outlook can't handle that -- it took me to an opportunity to sign in (I was already signed in!) but once I did that it had no record of the address I wanted to send to.

My husband uses Gmail, which now wants us to distinguish between several kinds of faint arrows instead of using words to describe functions such as "Reply." It also has many other nonintuitive quirks, such as providing clickable text labeled "Attachment," but clicking it just makes the text blink and the actual download link is at the other end of the message.

I would want a cloud service, so I can have my email where I am. I would also like to be able to download chunks of email for local archiving. I would want the high-quality spam filtering that I get with Outlook. I do not have a service I can piggyback on, such as SBC; I would have to have an independent email service.

Any thoughts? Thank you!

Discussion is locked
You are posting a reply to: Are there decent paid email services?
The posting of advertisements, profanity, or personal attacks is prohibited. Please refer to our CNET Forums policies for details. All submitted content is subject to our Terms of Use.
Track this discussion and email me when there are updates

If you're asking for technical help, please be sure to include all your system info, including operating system, model number, and any other specifics related to the problem. Also please exercise your best judgment when posting in the forums--revealing personal information such as your e-mail address, telephone number, and address is not recommended.

You are reporting the following post: Are there decent paid email services?
This post has been flagged and will be reviewed by our staff. Thank you for helping us maintain CNET's great community.
Sorry, there was a problem flagging this post. Please try again now or at a later time.
If you believe this post is offensive or violates the CNET Forums' Usage policies, you can report it below (this will not automatically remove the post). Once reported, our moderators will be notified and the post will be reviewed.

All Answers

Collapse -
Answer
I've been very happy with Comcast
by wpgwpg / April 13, 2013 4:50 AM PDT

I use Comcast and in my area they've been very good for me. It's been enough years (maybe 10-15?) that I don't remember how long it's been. If you set up your email client to leave your email on their server (I set mine for 30 days), you can access it wherever you are either online or via your email client. I use Windows Live Mail on my laptop and I can also get email with my Kindle Fire via WiFi or with my desktop. Apparently the quality of service varies from place to place, so check in your neighborhood.

Collapse -
Sorry, don't have access to cable.
by Judyintexas / April 14, 2013 1:39 AM PDT

Thank you, wpgwpg. I failed to mention that we also do not have cable. We use a Verizon aircard for Internet service.

Collapse -
You could try Yahoo's email
by wpgwpg / April 14, 2013 3:01 AM PDT

The only other online email I can think of is Yahoo. It's not bad. You might want to try that.

Collapse -
Answer
It sounds like you are confusing email apps and web apps.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / April 14, 2013 1:43 AM PDT

I can use gmail with many email app (usually called mail clients.) So I can use my old Outlook 2003 with Gmail.

I do not have to use the web site gmail.com unless I want to.

Has anyone discussed this with you?
Bob

Collapse -
Sounds like it might work for my husband
by Judyintexas / April 15, 2013 5:11 AM PDT

Thank you, Bob,

My husband used to use Outlook and if using that as a client would make Gmail look like the old Outlook, he might like that. Can you point me to some resources? We are on Windows Vista right now, and I think the old Outlook did not come with that.

I have never used Outlook, so don't know if that would work as a replacement for me for the old Hotmail.

wpgwpg, I am reluctant to move to Yahoo mail because I expect it will suffer upheval as soon as the new manamgement notices it.

Thanks for your continuing help.

Collapse -
All the resources I know of are found with google.com
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / April 15, 2013 5:30 AM PDT

I think you need to find someone to talk to about using email applications versus web email.

If I didn't convey what an email client is, then I failed.
Bob

Collapse -
O.K., can you help me select a client?
by Judyintexas / April 16, 2013 4:43 AM PDT

Thank you, Bob,

I have now read up on the difference between mail services and clients. Let's start by finding a client for Gmail that leaves the mail on the server, ideally except for the spam and mischiefware that the user clicks to delete. I read up on Thunderbird, which seems to not leave the mail on the server. This defeats my husband's purpose of needing to get to his email wherever he is. I couldn't tell from what I could find about eM Client whether it leaves the email on the server or not.

Can someone point me to candidates to investigate?

Again, I appreciate your help.

Collapse -
I use gmail.com and
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / April 16, 2013 5:50 AM PDT

My mail is still there even if I use the default setting of Outlook 2003 which, well what can I add here except I can use a web browser to gmail.com and then still see my email on the web page. So why not try this with your choice of email software?

And yes you can set almost all email software to leave mail on server.
Bob

Popular Forums
icon
Computer Help 49,613 discussions
icon
Computer Newbies 10,349 discussions
icon
Laptops 19,436 discussions
icon
Security 30,426 discussions
icon
TVs & Home Theaters 20,308 discussions
icon
Windows 10 360 discussions
icon
Phones 15,802 discussions
icon
Windows 7 7,351 discussions
icon
Networking & Wireless 14,641 discussions

Tech explained

Do you know what an OLED TV is?

CNET explains how OLED technology differs from regular TVs, and what you need to know to make the right shopping decision.