Speakeasy forum

Rant

An unforeseen result

by TONI H / January 6, 2013 8:50 PM PST
Post a reply
Discussion is locked
You are posting a reply to: An unforeseen result
The posting of advertisements, profanity, or personal attacks is prohibited. Please refer to our CNET Forums policies for details. All submitted content is subject to our Terms of Use.
Track this discussion and email me when there are updates

If you're asking for technical help, please be sure to include all your system info, including operating system, model number, and any other specifics related to the problem. Also please exercise your best judgment when posting in the forums--revealing personal information such as your e-mail address, telephone number, and address is not recommended.

You are reporting the following post: An unforeseen result
This post has been flagged and will be reviewed by our staff. Thank you for helping us maintain CNET's great community.
Sorry, there was a problem flagging this post. Please try again now or at a later time.
If you believe this post is offensive or violates the CNET Forums' Usage policies, you can report it below (this will not automatically remove the post). Once reported, our moderators will be notified and the post will be reviewed.
Collapse -
That's hilarious!!!!
by JP Bill / January 6, 2013 9:17 PM PST
In reply to: An unforeseen result

It wasn't THAT long ago that people with older cars couldn't get parts to keep them on the road, BECAUSE of Cash For Clunkers, NOW more people are hanging on to vehicles that are over 10 years old when they used to only hang onto them for an average of 8., BECAUSE of Cash For Clunkers.

Seems like there are a lot of edges to that Cash For Clunkers Sword. It cuts whichever way YOU want it.

Collapse -
More hilarious
by TONI H / January 6, 2013 9:43 PM PST
In reply to: That's hilarious!!!!

Many of those crushed cars were only two or three years old.......but they were on the lists that were given out by the Fed government and made eligible for the trade/crush because they averaged a mile or two less than the new ones people were buying. Those vehicles weren't allowed to be put back into used car inventories and were crushed even though they were perfectly fine running vehicles. The older vehicles that are still on the road can still get parts for them, after market or from junk yards, but perfectly good running vehicles are gone.

Collapse -
I noticed that you didn't bother to
by TONI H / January 6, 2013 9:45 PM PST
In reply to: That's hilarious!!!!

comment about the environment issue involved though.......If an oil rig, on land or sea, had dumped that much oil into the environment you would be one of the first to be up in arms over it. BTW....the Shell rig that floated ashore in Alaska has been freed, with no oil leaks, and is being towed thirty miles away and anchored down again, so your hysteria over it was groundless (pun intended)

Collapse -
A couple days ago you suggested I start a hypocrisy thread
by JP Bill / January 6, 2013 10:06 PM PST

about your hypocrisy,

I think this is the one I'll use.

Collapse -
RE: no oil leaks, and is being towed thirty miles away and
by JP Bill / January 6, 2013 10:19 PM PST
no oil leaks, and is being towed thirty miles away and anchored down again, so your hysteria over it

WHY did they have to "check for leaks" IF it was such a non-event/not to worry/nothing can go wrong?

MY hysteria?

MY hysteria.....Here?

I didn't even comment on the grounding, More stuff you pull out of ?
Collapse -
Maybe he could worry about this
by James Denison / January 6, 2013 11:20 PM PST

And it's off California!

http://www.whoi.edu/oceanus/viewArticle.do?id=57272

"Off Santa Barbara, there's an oil spill every day, allowing us to take a close look at a process that previously eluded our grasp.

I vividly remember standing on the boat and calling my lab manager, Bob Nelson, telling him to book a plane ticket and pack a long list of gear. We returned days later to start investigating the fate of oil in the coastal ocean, using this readily accessible natural laboratory.

Following an oily trail

I had learned about natural oil seeps in graduate school, and I knew that they account for about 50 percent of oil that ends up in the coastal environment. That's five times as much oil as is delivered by accidental spills.

The Santa Barbara seeps, for example emit 5,280 to 6,600 gallons (nearly 20 to 25 tons) of oil per day, and natural seeps have been active for hundreds to thousands of years. Local Native Americans used the oil to waterproof their boats. But I just didn't appreciate how spectacular they were and what a powerful opportunity they provided to study oil spills. "

Collapse -
Maybe YOU can worry about this.
by JP Bill / January 6, 2013 11:33 PM PST
U.S. concerned about oil tanker traffic from B.C.

Concerns south of the border over oil tanker traffic from British Columbia have spurred a U.S. Coast Guard review of proposed increases in Canadian oil exports.

A legislative amendment proposed by Washington state Senator Maria Cantwell and signed into law by President Barack Obama a couple of weeks ago gives the U.S. marine safety agency six months to conduct a risk assessment of the planned expansion of oil pipeline capacity to the West Coast.

While several proposed projects would see oil from the Alberta oil sands brought to the B.C. coast for export primarily to China, the legislation deals specifically with tanker traffic out of the Vancouver area.

"According to reports, Canada is poised to increase oil tanker traffic through the waters around the San Juan Islands and the Juan de Fuca by up to 300 per cent," said a statement issued by Ms. Cantwell's office.

"A supertanker oil spill near our shores would threaten Washington state's thriving coastal economy and thousands of jobs," the Democratic senator said in the statement. "This bill will provide crucial information for Washington coastal communities by requiring a detailed risk analysis. ..."
Popular Forums
icon
Computer Help 47,885 discussions
icon
Computer Newbies 10,322 discussions
icon
iPhones, iPods, & iPads 3,188 discussions
icon
Security 30,333 discussions
icon
TVs & Home Theaters 20,177 discussions
icon
HDTV Picture Setting 1,932 discussions
icon
Phones 15,713 discussions
icon
Windows 7 6,210 discussions
icon
Networking & Wireless 14,510 discussions

Big stars on small screens

Smosh tells CNET what it took to make it big online

Internet sensations Ian Hecox and Anthony Padilla discuss how YouTube has changed and why among all their goals, "real TV" isn't an ambition.