Desktops forum

General discussion

American made computer

by jrhiggins / November 15, 2003 12:50 AM PST

I'm thinking about buying a new desktop. I try to buy mostly products made in the United States (with mostly American made components). Any suggestions on companies would be appreciated.

Discussion is locked
You are posting a reply to: American made computer
The posting of advertisements, profanity, or personal attacks is prohibited. Please refer to our CNET Forums policies for details. All submitted content is subject to our Terms of Use.
Track this discussion and email me when there are updates

If you're asking for technical help, please be sure to include all your system info, including operating system, model number, and any other specifics related to the problem. Also please exercise your best judgment when posting in the forums--revealing personal information such as your e-mail address, telephone number, and address is not recommended.

You are reporting the following post: American made computer
This post has been flagged and will be reviewed by our staff. Thank you for helping us maintain CNET's great community.
Sorry, there was a problem flagging this post. Please try again now or at a later time.
If you believe this post is offensive or violates the CNET Forums' Usage policies, you can report it below (this will not automatically remove the post). Once reported, our moderators will be notified and the post will be reviewed.
Collapse -
Re:American made computer
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / November 15, 2003 1:05 AM PST
In reply to: American made computer
Collapse -
Re:American made computer
by David Chan / November 15, 2003 3:36 AM PST
In reply to: American made computer

Good luck finding a computer that is made in the US with only US manufactured components.

Even DELL, HP, Microsoft use components made in Asia.
My Microsoft Keyboard is made in Thailand and Microsoft Wheel Optical Mouse is made in China!

Unfortunately due to the lower production costs most if not all the major components like the motherboard, video card, RAM, CD-ROM drives etc. are made in Asia.

Even the Intel CPUs are assembled in countries like Phillipines, Thailand and Malaysia!

The only consolation is if you buy a PC made by HP/DELL/Compaq the profits go to a US Corporation.

Collapse -
Re:Re:American made computer
by jrhiggins / November 19, 2003 9:08 AM PST

It's too bad! I reluctantly realize that I can't get all-American made components, but I'd be happy if most were!

Collapse -
Re:Re:Re:American made computer. No such luck...
by David Chan / November 19, 2003 10:18 AM PST

In a typical Desktop Computer:

* The case & PSU is often made in China.
* The motherboard often in Taiwan.
* The Intel CPU may be assembled in Phillipines or Malaysia, Costa Rica or Ireland.
* The Ram from Korea or Taiwan.
* The Floppy Disk Drive may be from Thailand.
* The CD-RW/DVD-ROM drives from Korea, Japan.
* The HDD from Thailand, Malaysia or Korea.
* The Video Cards from China or Taiwan.
* The Sound Card from Taiwan or China.

The Computer may have been assembled in Mexico.

The final PC goes to you and the profits go to the corporations.

Where is the US component?

Sad

Collapse -
I know of one power supply.
by strickjh2005 / May 5, 2008 4:07 AM PDT

It is from microcenter. Made in USA. I have one. There is NO documentation for it found anywhere on the web, no technical data sheets, no one else uses it, it looks weird and fails to provide good voltages.

Neat huh?!

From my experience all american made electronics (save maybe some speakers) suck.

[/Pride]I am American.

Collapse -
Besides,
by strickjh2005 / May 5, 2008 4:09 AM PDT

manufacturing electronics uses a lot of brominated compounds, lead and mercury. Why in the hell would you want ANY american working with that stuff on a day to day basis? It is all poison!

Collapse -
Re:American made computer
by aboteler / June 4, 2004 2:33 AM PDT
In reply to: American made computer

I have found that if you look you can usually find US made stuff-- even computers. For computers, there's polywell.com, I'm looking at buying one of the PC there), and supermicro.com that make their own motherboards.

I'm trying to do my part in keeping manufacturing jobs in the US by buying US made goods.

Collapse -
AMERICAN MADE COMPUTERS
by tayloredone / July 9, 2007 4:23 AM PDT
In reply to: American made computer

I have purchased computers from Velocity Micro, headquatered in Virginia. Everything is made there, repaired there and sold there. One stop shopping and wonderful to do business with and their customer service is terrific. Myself, my business collegues, family and friends are all on a mission to ONLY buy from American companies who DO NOT OUTSOURCE as well as manufacture right here in the good ole USA. Check them out...

http://velocitymicro.com/

Collapse -
Rethink that
by Willy / July 9, 2007 11:19 PM PDT

You should seriously reconsider what VM does. No where does it state it makes 100% USA computer BUT rather it really assemblies the computer from parts which in turn are made not from USA manufacture. The CDs, HDs, monitors, cases, etc. are usually made somewhere else, I thought even the screws are made here. Probably the only item made in the USA is the VM logo badge. Wink -----Willy Happy

Collapse -
Not likely...
by Willy / July 9, 2007 1:07 PM PDT
In reply to: American made computer

I agree with many that there aren't *any* US made computers anymore. Anyone that's says so, I could tear it apart and point to offshore componets. Far too much is produced offshore and assembled here or sub-assemblies then final assembly here in US. Don't feel bad, that's the way it is for many items besides computers here. Find what you need and get the best warranty or service after the sale for the best deal you can find.

tada -----Willy Happy

Collapse -
Honestly
by ozos / July 9, 2007 11:34 PM PDT
In reply to: American made computer

It isn't possible, I get the whole "lets support america" thing, but really, it doesn't matter that much. The majority of "high level" computer hardware (silicon devices) comes from Germany, Japan, the United States, or Taiwan, the majority of everything else comes from Taiwan, Thailand, or China, it isn't just cheaper labor practices that create the outsource, its the availability of engineering students, trained technicians, government help (for example AMD relocated primary fabrication from Texas to Germany, because the German government offered tax incentives and a good region for building; and because theres an abundance of engineers and employees).

Polywell and Velocity Micro claim "100% made in america", which is entirely untrue, ECS Group manufactures something like 40% of motherboars worldwide, most of which come straight out of Shenzhen, the majority of hard-drives worldwide see a factory in Shenzhen, Singapore, Malaysia, or Thailand, the majority of LCD monitors see Korean or Chinese foundaries.

Basically, the majority of computer parts come from only 10-15 companies, and are rebadged quite a bit before they ever see the United States market (just like how Acura isn't really a car company, its just a name that Honda throws on cars to upsell them for US consumers).

I'm not trying to rain on patriotism, I'm just trying to speak to the global market, not everything can be had from the US, and in most cases, its not always the best to be had from the US (consider, if you buy an Intel chip you're still supporting an american company, which contributes to the US economy, but this company also operates in other locations, such as Israel, so by helping this company turn a profit, it allows it to continue operations around the world, which help other national economies).

So, I'd just go to what Willy said, get the best system you can based on performance, price, warranty support, etc, you could even build it yourself.

Collapse -
HAH, i just saw
by ozos / July 9, 2007 11:37 PM PDT
In reply to: Honestly

This thread is from 2003...and apparently 3 of us revived it in 2007 for some unknown reason...whoopsie

Collapse -
American Assembled....I stand corrected
by tayloredone / July 10, 2007 12:42 AM PDT
In reply to: Honestly

OK all you naysayers....I understand that the parts may not be manufactured here but at the very least we can speak with an American about sales or issues and actually have someone on the other end not only understand what we are saying, but they do not repeat it 10 times before switching us to someone else who hasn't clue...so with all of this said...I am only buying from companies that DO NOT OUTSOURCE, and are actually headquartered in the USA....whatever we can do to support the people here in this country so they can stay off the unemployemnt line, and feed their families, is a good thing....every little bit helps, and I know that one person can and does make a difference...

Collapse -
See
by ozos / July 10, 2007 2:15 AM PDT

As much as this isn't going to be a popular view, I'm honestly disgusted with the whole anti-outsource "if you go to another country the person can't speak english" notion held by many people. American CSRs are notoriously the worst service personel you can get because they aren't feeding the fabled middle class family, they're 20 somethings in college who could really care less about your problem because they're getting paid $7/hr to take verbal abuse for 8 hours a day from clients who usually know less than nothing about the system or the problem.

While, by contrast, the employee in India, eastern Europe, mainland Asia, etc, is going to strive to provide you with some support because those are the people who ARE actually trying to support their families working the same job, taking the same abuse, and trying to stay out of the unemployment line, consider that they are striving so hard for this that they are willing to pick up one of the hardest languages in human history, just to make a pittance of an hourly salary.

As Thomas Friedman has said, the world IS flat, and if anyone plans to exist in the 21st century, nationalism has no place. By nationalism, I don't mean patriotism, I mean the view that being of one nation makes you better than people from another nation, a desire to have everything done "in house", to have everything isolated. It can't be done in modern society, the world is too economically intertwined and interconnected, and its a very ignorant position to want "only in america" and rejecting anything from outside the US, its blind and misguided. Hardly any product sold commerically comes from any single country, its the way the world economic system works.

Collapse -
WHAT COUNTRY ARE YOU FROM
by tayloredone / July 10, 2007 2:41 AM PDT
In reply to: See

PULEASE....either you are not American or you have money invested in outsourcing. Talk to any intelligent, sane, patient person who has spent literally half of their life trying to get someone to understand their problem while conversing with an outsourced company and they will SCREAM at what you have written. You can say whatever you want, whoever you are, but the truth of this outsourcing is the truth. I know that I ALWAYS get polite, professional customer service when an AMERICAN is on the phone, not the other way. They are all reading from a script and if you deviate, they haven't a clue and all this does is frustrate the consumer. Do whatever you want to do, but we have made a stand and we are sticking to it...all 300 of us at the moment...will not be purchasing from any companies that outsource... we are going to start a trend...and we are passing this to everyone we know, and they know and so on, etc. et al. Eventually as AMERICANS, we will make a difference and we will bring back employment, and food to a nation that is sorely lacking in both. So you may continue with your rhetoric, because thankfully, AMERICA is a free country....

Collapse -
Honestly...
by ozos / July 10, 2007 1:12 PM PDT

My nationality doesn't matter, nor does my investment portfolio. Your stating that an "intelligent, sane, patient person" will follow your arguement, yet you also state that an American will follow your arguement. Additionally, your arguement is in favor of rejecting all things foriegn to "bring back food to america", I don't see many commericals for American children starving in the streets, dying of dysentery, or being signed up for Feed The Children (or whatever the latest is), however I do see this for a large number of countries that you and your 300 buddies would classify as the 3rd world. So, if I understand your arguement correctly, the perpetuation of this poverty and hell on earth is a good thing, so that American consumers can recieve technical support that requires less intelligence on their part? Just making sure we're on the same page here.

Collapse -
We now know...
by tayloredone / July 10, 2007 10:26 PM PDT
In reply to: Honestly...

From your response, we all now know where you are not from...America...just live here and gain from everything we have to offer and then beat us up for helping everyone in the entire world...sorta like biting the hand that feeds you...get out your aggresion and hatred and try helping someone instead of hating them...can you imagine if every person just stopped for one minute to help another what an amazing world this would be... just so you know, this is my LAST posting. I am done...I am concentrating on my job...which will surprise you...feeding hungry families...yes, that is what I do...
Now why don't you do a random act of kindness today, you will be amazed at how good you will feel.
Bye bye...

Collapse -
Very interesting.
by mopscare42 / December 7, 2007 10:22 PM PST
In reply to: Honestly...

If it involves electronics there is very little that is made in the USA anymore. Why? it boils down to $$$$.
I talked to a HP rep at a Bestbuy store a few months ago about the tech support in India and that the people over there do not understand either the spoken or written english (american) language.
He told me that he is paid about $240.00 a day if you include his benifits. The people in India make $14.00 a day with no benifits whatsoever.
If you force the issue and ask for an english speaking tech, you get a tech in Canada, Which by the way seem to be as good if not better than they are in the US.
So it is not only parts, it is also service.
I think most of us in the USA would love to see more things stamped "made in america" but those days are long gone.

Collapse -
Buy American
by bubboaz / December 5, 2007 1:35 PM PST
In reply to: See

The desire to buy American products is not by nature backwards or isolationist as you make it sound. The flood of US dollars pouring into China is funding a massive military build-up that threatens to alter the course of world events. The Chinese are hacking US corporate and government sites, blinding our spy satellites with ground based lasers, and polluting the atmosphere on a scale that defies belief. Ten per cent of all our food now comes from China including half our seafood and eighty percent of our apple sauce!
All this so corporations can mke billions and the rest of us can have all the toys we want at a bargain price. This isn't the global economy. It's an addiction, pure and simple.

Collapse -
I have had numerous problems with out sourced support
by Dango517 / December 6, 2007 12:30 PM PST
In reply to: See

I've also had problems with American support as well, the industry as a whole is terrible. I know what they do, we do it here every day and with a keyboard not a phone. I've spent days on the phone on numerous occasions with various help desks to end up this nothing more then the problem that I started with. When I say days I mean that literally, eight hour at a time. That's why I came here.

Collapse -
(NT) why are new posts to 3 year old topics even allowed?!?!
by ramarc / July 10, 2007 2:09 PM PDT
Collapse -
Thankful
by Solar7k / July 14, 2007 3:30 AM PDT

I'm so glad that people DID suddenly reply to this 3-year old post. I registered just so I could respond.

I've just recently committed to not buying Chinese products at all, and buying American whenever possible. I was wondering if I could even get a PC made in America, if not at the very least NOT made in China. This gives me some hope.

Thanks

Collapse -
Me too
by buyamerican / July 22, 2007 1:03 PM PDT
In reply to: Thankful

Just signed up so I can reply to this thread also. I just had to take a thomas the train toy from my kid because it got recalled for lead paint and that was the nail in the coffin on Chinese products. I'll never give another dime to China until they clean up their act, go democratic, and reform their oppressive labor practices.

On the topic of computers ... there's actually a couple of companies making cases in the states. One of them is Mountain Mods (http://www.mountainmods.com/) - they make high end aluminum and acrylic cases. The other company is California PC Products (http://www.calpc.com/).

I'd be interested in finding a list of where companies manufacture parts. Does one exist somewhere? I realize it's impossible to build an all American computer, but I think it makes sense to support countries with similar political beliefs and those who have at least a semblance of worker protection .

Collapse -
What you didn't mention was we went through this in the 80s
by Dango517 / December 7, 2007 11:05 PM PST

My problem with this is the loss of entire industries. Entire segments of the economy have been moved off continent and this puts us at risk economically and vulnerable. We're would we be if hypothetically one Asia country invaded another and it spread into a regional conflict? How would this effect the computer industry here in America? Would we have the skill sets necessary to build them ourselves and how long would that take? What would the economic ills of this be on our own economy? How about defence vulnabilities? No this is to large a risk. At least 20% of all industries should be based in the US. This isn't a protectionist point of view it's a logical and reasonible one well grounded in our own best interests.

Collapse -
This is a National Security risk
by Dango517 / December 6, 2007 12:39 PM PST
In reply to: Honestly

To have all of a Nations computer equipment made within another country puts that country at risk during a time of crisis. It is in our own best interest to recover some of these lost industries. I would include the textiles business and the television industry as well. We are fools to continue to completely rely on others for these essential products and services.

Collapse -
When my Neighbor don't work I don't work
by cbeach5 / May 1, 2008 8:12 PM PDT
In reply to: American made computer

YES Indeed, I am on the same mission. I thought I was getting a American made product when I got my Dell but NOT.
I am FEED UP, when my neighbor don't work I don't work. All this Corporate GREED. These CEO's Have to make 10's o Millions in a salary while they put the American worker out on the street. Meanwhile we wonder why our homes are going into foreclosure, and dollar is Shrinking. How much more of American are going to sell out to Corporate Greed. I still can not Figure out HOW Bill Clinton got the China Trade aggreement without having Congress Pass it?
WE need Balanced Trade NOT FREE at the expense of the American workers. The Corporate Greed has Just Circumvented the American laws against Slave and Free Labor in the US. So go figure?

Collapse -
I found a good American Made Computer!
by leemom2 / April 16, 2009 6:28 AM PDT
In reply to: American made computer

Systemax! Made in Ohio, w/American parts and American Labor!!! You can even understand them because they only speak English! I first saw it on "Tiger Direct" then went to their website, sent them an email,got an immediate reply, and ordered the latest, fastest machine at an outstanding price! I'm a teacher and did my homework, it's the best! Wink

Collapse -
Ain't going to happen...
by Willy / April 16, 2009 11:16 AM PDT
In reply to: American made computer

Just be happy that your American(I assume) sweat is being used to put it all together. No matter how hard you try, something will be from offshore. Now there maybe American cos. putting it all together, but overall, they still use parts from Asia, etc., and rarely will they be American made 100%. Effectively its "assembled in USA".

tada -----Willy Happy

Collapse -
Some American made computers
by direwolf120 / April 20, 2009 12:13 PM PDT
In reply to: American made computer

I know some computer companies that make computers in America. Even though Dell, HP, and all other top leading brands make computers in other countries, specialized companies like Digital Storm and Realm Computers make their computers in the U.S.

Even though some components are not made in America, it is the closest that you can get to an American made computer.

The two companies that I have listed are really good companies and the fact that they are made in the U.S. makes them even more reliable as they are not being shipped across many seas.

The websites of Digital Storm and Realm Computers are listed below. Also check out reviews about the two companies as they are much higher than that of the major brands.

http://digitalstormonline.com/
http://www.realmcomputers.com/

Collapse -
American Made Computers
by boveytracy / December 23, 2009 11:53 AM PST
In reply to: American made computer

I am also looking to purchasde an American Made Computer.
I was shopping on Tiger Direct last night and came across this computer.
Systemax? is the Great American PC Maker.
Considering Another PC Vendor? Ask These 3 questions:
1. Are 100% of their systems assembled in the USA by US workers?
2. Are 100% of their tech support calls and emails answered in the USA by US workers?
3. Do they have a company policy to NEVER export American jobs?

If they can't answer YES to all 3 questions, then come ask Systemax?. We say "Yes" to the American worker. We are the largest, most reliable PC manufacturer in the country that can make these claims. We've been assembling and supporting the highest quality PCs with the latest technology in Fletcher, Ohio for over 20 years.
Is this American made enough for you.

Popular Forums
icon
Computer Help 47,885 discussions
icon
Computer Newbies 10,322 discussions
icon
iPhones, iPods, & iPads 3,188 discussions
icon
Security 30,333 discussions
icon
TVs & Home Theaters 20,177 discussions
icon
HDTV Picture Setting 1,932 discussions
icon
Phones 15,713 discussions
icon
Windows 7 6,210 discussions
icon
Networking & Wireless 14,510 discussions

Big stars on small screens

Smosh tells CNET what it took to make it big online

Internet sensations Ian Hecox and Anthony Padilla discuss how YouTube has changed and why among all their goals, "real TV" isn't an ambition.