Networking & Wireless forum


Am I being tracked on a wireless network? How can I tell?

by 96z / December 7, 2011 9:47 AM PST

At my workplace we recently received a warning that we need to get off the internet during work hours. Half of the shop uses laptops, and the other half desk tops. Originally the desktops were monitored by software that prevented access to non work related sites. Those that worked on desktops were told that the websites they searched for could also be tracked. Obviously due to the software.

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All Answers

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This one is too easy.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / December 7, 2011 10:07 AM PST

All requests go through the business router which can log what machine asked for what.

It does not matter how. It's their network and the business can track all accesses. If employees don't get the message soon, they may not be there long.

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All your data is mine
by bill012 / December 7, 2011 9:32 PM PST

Don't expect to be able to hide just because there is no tracking software. You could bring in a personal laptop and the company can track you. The network is theirs and they can see every bit of data you send and receive from the machine.

In a business network its actually even easier to prove who is doing what. Many times you must authenticate with a domain controller which provides clear proof of which user is using what IP address at any time even if they try to change it. It is trivial to log every IP and every request. Does not take much to run a report that shows exactly how much time someone is spending on each site.

Generally tracking of users is a byproduct of normal network monitoring. Almost all companies keep track of their network utilization and in general what type of data is being used but there is much more data stored.

I can promise you can not hide if they want to find you. I have on many occasions been asked by HR to capture every byte of data going to and from a particular users machine. They seldom tell me why but I don't suspect it is to reward the person for doing a great job.

Just use a smart phone YOU pay for but it still doesn't stop them from walking by your desk and wondering why you are wasting all day on your phone.

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Bob and Bill make good points . . .
by Coryphaeus / December 8, 2011 4:16 AM PST

Let me just say this. If you use their network and server, they can see you. Period. And on closing, you can be fired for misuse.

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