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General discussion

Advanced System Care.

by Mailman / June 27, 2009 1:36 AM PDT

I have Advanced System Care Free V. 3.3.1

I got notice through the program that Free v. 3.3.3 is available for download. It takes me to the CNET download site automatically. So I click to begin the download, and my browser freezes, and the only way I can shut it down is ctrl-alt-del. Tried Firefox and I.E. Both the same results. Does anyone know what is up with this Advanced System Care Free program?

Thanks,

~Dave

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Re: downloading
by Kees Bakker / June 27, 2009 1:41 AM PDT
In reply to: Advanced System Care.
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I only cared.....
by Mailman / June 27, 2009 1:46 AM PDT
In reply to: Re: downloading

...because I didn't know about the alternate way you showed to get the file. Thanks very much.

~Dave

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Let me tell you how I found it.
by Kees Bakker / June 27, 2009 6:57 AM PDT
In reply to: I only cared.....

I cheated. I asked google: DOWNLOAD ADVANCED SYSTEM CARE. It was hit #5. The first 4 were either iobit itself or Cnet. Quite good.

Out of curiosity I also tried Microsofts new bing (the decision engine). On the first page there were 3 links that McAfee's Siteadvisor made RED and one it made YELLOW. And 2 cracked Pro versions. The first useful hit for the free version was #10. Quite bad. Or let me say: VERY VERY BAD.
I really can't advise bing for general use when I see this. But maybe it's useful inside its own limited niche: health, shops and restaurants in the USA.

Kees

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Also....
by Mailman / June 27, 2009 1:59 AM PDT
In reply to: Re: downloading

....it's interesting that you blocked the site. It seems to be tied to CNET. Is CNET a dangerous site now? I know they push the Pro version of ASC very hard. A little annoying.

~Dave

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Not dangerous...
by John.Wilkinson / June 27, 2009 3:33 AM PDT
In reply to: Also....

But Cnet does display a lot of ads on its webpages, and unless you're careful about how you choose to block the ads you may inadvertently block legitimate content, such as downloads, as well.

As to ASC, I am able to download it using both browsers, so it may have just been a one-time glitch. I do wonder how Cnet is pushing the Professional version, though...is this through emails, website adverts, or something else?

John

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I do wonder how Cnet is pushing the Professional version...
by Mailman / June 27, 2009 3:43 AM PDT
In reply to: Not dangerous...

Well, they have constant pop ups when using the free version. I suppose that it's no worse than other free version software, though.

And with all the ads on the web pages, and insistence on installing cookies, that might be part of the problem. Seems that if you block these things, they don't want to let you have the free software. My browser freezes, and my HDD goes crazy with activity. The only way to close is ctrl-alt-del. So I guess I just have to install from scratch every time instead of using the link in the program.

I just think this kind of activity from a program site which is supposed to help me fight this kind of thing is kind of hypocritical. ASC I guess is against this kind of thing unless it's pushing their ads and stuff.

~Dave

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That's not Cnet...

Cnet only distributes the applications created by the developers; any ads, limitations, et cetera discovered within the program are put there by the developers of ASC, not Cnet.

As to ads on Cnet, they are created and paid for by the respective advertisers. The advertisers even select how frequently you see the ads, what pages you see the ads on, and how 'obtrusive' they are. Cnet puts limitations on it, but how far the ads go within those bounds is up to the advertisers, including the developers of ASC.

Finally, you can safely block all ads and cookies and still download software from Cnet. You just have to be careful not to make a rule too general (like "block cnet.com") and accidentally block legitimate content. The same goes for most websites. Unfortunately, it is something we must accept as individuals and companies look to profit from advertising, a move largely influenced by consumers' general reluctance to pay for products and services.

Regards,
John

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Well, I guess....
by Mailman / June 27, 2009 5:42 AM PDT
In reply to: That's not Cnet...

...I should just be grateful for the free software. And accept whatever annoyances that go along with it. But whoever got the big idea that trying to annoy a potential customer into upgrading to paid software from free, might want to re-think the notion. No one ever pi$$ed me off into buying anything. There are still other free software to choose from. And since I'm adversely affected by the recession like a lot of others, I will just have to do the best I can with the free stuff.

~Dave

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I know the feeling...
by John.Wilkinson / June 27, 2009 6:56 AM PDT
In reply to: Well, I guess....

But they push the paid versions because, as businesses, they want to make money. The idea is to get you hooked on the free version, then push the new features they believe you cannot live without. That both keeps their business successful and gives them the funds to continue development of the free versions, which may otherwise not exist.

In the case of open-source freeware, the developers usually ask for donations, displays third-party ads, and/or strike search deals (such as Mozilla with Google over Firefox) in order to keep from going in the hole. Those who do not rarely last long at all.

John

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Sorry, wrong link.
by Kees Bakker / June 27, 2009 7:06 AM PDT
In reply to: Advanced System Care.
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