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TVs & Home Theaters

Question

4-ohm speakers on 8-ohm stereo

by kbuikmvaj / July 17, 2013 2:05 PM PDT

I have a Sony stereo that's over 10 years old so it's rated for 8-to-16-ohm speakers. I use just 2 speakers and they're kind of sorry. I was just given some new speakers from a htib that are 4-ohm and I'd like to replace my current speakers with two of these. From looking around, it seems that connecting those speakers to my stereo might blow something (not sure what) so I was wondering if I can solder 4-ohm resistors into the speaker wires (in series with the speaker) and correct the mismatch. I don't really know what the stated impedance refers to, so I don't know if this is brilliant or stupid but I'm sure someone will tell me. Happy

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All Answers

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Answer
Why not read prior discussions?
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / July 17, 2013 2:34 PM PDT
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I did a search of this site
by kbuikmvaj / July 17, 2013 2:51 PM PDT

and googled the web generally and although many people ask about whether they can use speakers of a different impedance from their amp, I didn't find anybody who was actually looking to correct the impedance. I'm glad to know it's been covered and I'll check your link; so often finding the right answer depends on using just the right search terms and it never occurred to me that the terms you used would actually work!

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There are many right answers.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / July 17, 2013 2:56 PM PDT

But only you can select yours.

Mine was to put a pair of 4 ohm speakers in series. 2 per cabinet and I was done. Your audiophiles usually scoff at such things.
Bob

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Yes, apparently there ARE many right answers.
by kbuikmvaj / July 17, 2013 3:15 PM PDT

I did a search using your link and a very quick look found the following ones:
1) You can run 4-ohm speakers on an 8-ohm amp, no problems.
2) No you can't, you'll overheat your amp.
3) If you're careful you'll be fine.

4) Put a 4-ohm resistor in series into the speaker wire, works fine.
5) No it won't, it'll still overheat the amp. (Or the resistor.)
6) Put two 4-ohm speakers in series on the same wire pair.

I'm glad I got that cleared up! Happy
Thanks

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And actually, I think I'm going to use your solution.
by kbuikmvaj / July 17, 2013 3:17 PM PDT

Thanks

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Answer
Yes I would connect them in series to see if that's ...
by Oldartq / July 17, 2013 5:55 PM PDT

what you are after. This way there won't be a chance of damaging the amplifier. The issue here is that because they are of different impedance and probably difference in efficency as well, so should have some sort of L-pad volume control of some kind to give you the same loudness. Give it a try, you might be able to live with it as it is.

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