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How To Video: Use Android Wear as a remote shutter button

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How To Video: Use Android Wear as a remote shutter button

2:05 /

Here's how to use your Android Wear to take photos, selfies and group shots without needing to touch your smartphone.

[MUSIC] Did you know you can use your Android Wear as a remote shutter release for your smartphone camera? I'm Lexy Savvides for CNET, I'm gonna show you two ways on how to do this. The first is the stock standard Google way, all you'll need to do is download the Google Camera App from the Play Store. Fire it up on your smartphone. You get all of the controls like HDR and Grid on your smartphone. When it comes to your Android ware, once your app is started, you'll see a car pop up that says, touch to start the camera. Now this will just give you a remote shutter release. Press it, and then the photo is taken on your smartphone, like so. So, this is kinda cool, but all you can do is basically, review the image after it's been taken, and all your other controls are on your smartphone. There is another way to get more control out of Android wear itself, and that's by downloading a third party app. It is called Wear Camera Remote. It's also available from the Play Store. Once it's installed on your Android smart phone all you need to do is, "Okay Google, start camera app." Once it finds the camera app on your smart phone it will load up. And you actually get a live TV remote on your wrist of the action that your smart phone is capturing. This is obviously going to only work within blue tooth range, but it'll give you a bit more control than the actual camera app from Google. If you swipe across you can also choose to use either the rear or the front camera to take photos, turn the flash on or off, and use a self-timer. Once you set everything to go, all you need to do to take a photo is just tap on the screen. And then if you've chosen a self-timer, it will count down and vibrate on your wrist. Or it will just take the photo like so and it will save it to your phone. So those are a couple of ways I'm using Androidware as a remote camera release. Stay tuned for heaps more fun tips on using Androidware over on CNet. [MUSIC]

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