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CNET News Video: Should you hold your breath for Google Fiber?

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CNET News Video: Should you hold your breath for Google Fiber?

2:12 /

Three months after Google launched its Gigabit network in Kansas City, Mo., CNET pays the town a visit to find out how the blazing-fast pipe has changed the way people work, and where Google will install the system next.

-What if online video chat was as instantaneous and immediate as a conversation on a cellphone or street view images loaded this quickly? This blazing fast connection is a result of Google Fiber. -Google Fiber starts with internet speeds up to a gigabit a second, its internet 100 times faster than what most Americans have today. -Three months ago, Google Fiber launched in Kansas City, Missouri and Kansas City, Kansas. -Things are so fast and it's so instantaneous and your workflow is so seamless. -Fiber is satisfying tech entrepreneurs need for speed and physicians are excited about the potential it holds for telemedicine, but home users shouldn't start dreaming about uploading hours of cute cat videos just yet. -Home Wi-Fi routers can't even transmit this speed and so until some of the other technology catches up with it, the average resident isn't gonna be able to take real advantage of it. -Google provides Wi-Fi devices designed to optimize the bigger pipe, but there are other bottlenecks. Current tablets and laptops weren't design for gigabit networks. So, how many people have signed up for Fiber in Kansas City? Google won't say. It's only announced plans to expand the neighboring areas, but nowhere beyond. That's likely because of the cost. Google competitively charges $70 a month for the speedy pipe, but it's reportedly paying much more. -Some analysts were estimating that it was costing Google between $6,000 and $8,000 per home to bring Google Fiber to those houses unless Google decides that it's going to truly take this effort nationwide or other companies come in and figure out a way to do it, maybe, at a lower cost. I don't think it's something that you're gonna happen overnight. Even three to five years from now, it might not happen. -But the search giant has the finances and incentive to continue offering it. It's discovered that the faster the connection, the more people use, you guessed it, Google. For CBS News, I'm Sumi Das, CNET.com.

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