Tim Berners-Lee

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How the Web was nearly the Mesh in podcast 380

It's 25 years since great Briton Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web, so we wax nostalgic about the early Internet and arguing over the phone.

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<p>In the late hours of March 12, 2003, I climbed aboard a borrowed snowmobile in Nome, Alaska, and headed out of town into the darkness, subzero temperatures, and 50 mph gusts of blowing snow along a poorly marked trail. My goal was to make it to the final checkpoint of the Iditarod Sled Dog Race, which was 22 miles from the finish line in downtown Nome. My plan was to file a report for my radio station via satellite phone as the leading musher left the checkpoint and then dash back to Nome to catch him as he crossed the finish line.
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What actually happened was that I became disoriented in the white-out conditions and endless snowdrifts. I took a wrong turn onto the frozen sea ice of the far northern Pacific, made a panicked 180-degree turn, and then came within a few feet of running over the leading dog team with the snowmobile. 
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Which brings me to Google Maps. I don't think it's a coincidence that since it has become possible to navigate almost anywhere via Maps on my Android phone, I haven't suffered from another case of frostbite like I did that night in Nome. (This snowbound picture of me, by the way, was not snapped that fateful night; though, it is from that same winter in Alaska). 
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Ten years later, I looked up the Iditarod Trail route on Google Maps and Google Earth. If I had been able to access such a tool on my phone that night in Nome, I would have known that part of the trail runs along the edge of the Bering Sea, and I wouldn't have freaked out and taken off in the direction of the only light in my field of vision -- which happened to be attached to the head of musher Robert Sorlie. (His dogs, running in front of his sled, were not wearing lights -- hence, they nearly ended up under my snowmobile skis.)
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While it's true that I was much younger -- and more stupid -- 10 years ago, I'd like to think that if Google Maps had been around back then that I would have taken one look at the route and turned my attention to Yelping about Nome's surprising abundance of fine pizza establishments instead. 
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Regardless, my travels are now more well-informed and, therefore, safer, which is why my whole family is very thankful for Google Maps.  
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--<a href="http://www.cnet.com/profile/ericcmack/">Eric Mack</a>, Crave writer </p>

The Web at 25: Out of the ashes and onto the Friendster

In part 3 of his four-part series reflecting on a life lived largely on the Web, Crave's Eric Mack recalls fleeing the dot-com bust fallout for Alaska, only to be drawn back to a digital world that was growing up fast.

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Web inventor Berners-Lee to answer your questions in Reddit AMA

Tim Berners-Lee, the man who pioneered the World-Wide Web, is hosting an Ask Me Anything session on Reddit today, the 25th anniversary of his invention.

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<p>In 1989, PCs were still a novelty for many folks, and at that point, how many people outside of scientific circles had every heard of something called the Internet? Things were about to start changing, though. </p><p> On March 13 of that year, a fellow named Tim Berners-Lee (seen here in 1994) working at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, <a href="http://news.cnet.com/8301-10787_3-10195512-60.html">made a proposal</a> that rather drily addressed "the problems of loss of information about complex evolving systems" and proposed "a solution based on a distributed hypertext system."</p><p> What it gave birth to was the World Wide Web, and thus, eventually, Facebook, eBay, Google, iTunes, YouTube, Pets.com, blogs....  </p>

Web inventor Berners-Lee to answer your questions in Reddit AMA

Tim Berners-Lee, the man who pioneered the World-Wide Web, is hosting an Ask Me Anything session on Reddit today, the 25th anniversary of his invention.

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Tim Berners-Lee: 25 years on, the Web still needs work (Q&A)

The World Wide Web is a smashing technological success. But the man who invented it wants it to break down more cultural barriers, thwart government snooping, and let the Web run applications not just house documents.

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The Web at 25: Dot-com bubble bursts and breaks me, too

In part 2 of a four-part series tracking a colorful quarter-century of the Web, Crave's Eric Mack drops out of school to join the dot-com madness of the late '90s, only to get drop-kicked back to where he came from.

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Tim Berners-Lee and his creation, the World Wide Web, in 1994

25 years ago the Web was born (pictures)

The Web we all stare at endlessly today looks nothing like the one Tim Berners-Lee first proposed in 1989. Take a look at some hardware, software, and schematics from the early years.

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Snowden at SXSW: The NSA set fire to the future of the Internet

In his first extended comments to the public, Edward Snowden calls on the development community at South by Southwest to create more usable privacy and security tools.

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Beautiful since 1995.

The Web at 25: I was a teenage dial-up addict

In part 1 of a four-part series, Crave's Eric Mack reflects on how the Web blossomed out of an idea from Tim Berners-Lee. Oh, and thanks for the awkward first kiss, AOL girl!

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Do yourself a favor and watch the video for today's episode because we're broadcasting from our new studio! We'll show off our Halloween costumes, tell you about the first ticket for driving with Google Glass, demo the Pax Ploom vaporizer, and more!

Ep. 1375: Where we lift the curtain on our new studio

Do yourself a favor and watch the video for today's episode because we're broadcasting from our new studio! We'll show off our Halloween costumes, tell you about the first ticket for driving with Google Glass, demo the Pax Ploom vaporizer, and more!

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Eolas' 'Interactive Web' patents invalid, appeals court affirms

The patents were used to extract hundreds of millions from tech companies online video streaming and search results suggestions.

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Internet Hall of Fame to induct top names in tech

Dozens of influential engineers, activists, and innovators are listed for second annual award ceremony, including J.C.R. Licklider, Jimmy Wales, and Aaron Swartz.

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