TomTom Via 620 review: TomTom Via 620

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CNET Editors' Rating

3 stars Good
Review Date:
Updated on:

The Good High resolution display. Speedy route calculation. Humungous 6-inch screen.

The Bad … is too big for most cars and might be a safety issue. No Bluetooth hands-free.

The Bottom Line We love the Via 620's high-resolution display, but we'd argue that unless you're driving a Land Cruiser, Hummer or some other gargantuan vehicle, the 6-inch display is simply too large and a potential safety hazard.

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Design

Quarter acre blocks, TVs that can be measured in metres and Hummers that require their own postcode — all these things fit the "bigger is better" school of thought. Now, you can add to that list the TomTom Via 620. It looks much like the other models in the Via range of GPS units, but this one's big, really big, thanks to its 6-inch touchscreen. The tapered hard plastic body does a good job of disguising the unit's 2.4cm thickness, while the faux brushed metal bezel hints, ever so slightly, at the finer things in life.

For the 6-inch behemoth of a screen, TomTom has wisely decided to increase the pixel count to 800x480, up from the resolution on regular units of 480x272. This upgrade is most noticeable when flicking through the menus or entering addresses as text, and graphics no longer have that jagged look. Aside from featuring smoother lines and curves, TomTom hasn't added any snap, crackle or pop to the plain, but easy to read, map screen.

The built-in speaker projects instructions and warnings nicely enough, and it has a good volume range that doesn't descend into a mire of static when you flick the volume up. The EasyMount suction cup is, as ever, wonderful in its simplicity and compactness, and won't get lost amongst the glove box detritus, as it's built into the device. The supplied in-car charging kit consists of a USB cigarette port and a micro-USB cable; though by no means a killer feature, this combo allows drivers to recharge their favourite smartphone when not using the GPS, or easily replace their charging gear should one part be lost.

Features

Aside from the screen that's so big you can eat your (small) dinner off it, what does the RRP of AU$249 buy you? Not as many headline features as we'd hoped, unfortunately. Notable absentees from the spec sheet include TomTom's proprietary subscription-based Live traffic and information service and Bluetooth hands-free — the latter being the item we most pined for.

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