Apple MacBook Pro 15 (Early 2011) review: Apple MacBook Pro 15 (Early 2011)

CNET Editors' Rating

4.5 stars Outstanding
Review Date:
Updated on:

The Good Powerful updates to the CPU and GPU. Excellent battery life. Still the best touch pad and gesture controls of any laptop.

The Bad Upgrades can get expensive. Thunderbolt is an unproven technology with as-yet no compatible products. Still no dedicated HDMI, Blu-ray or other wished-for options.

The Bottom Line It's a hefty investment, but the combination of new high-end Intel processor options and AMD graphics makes the 15-inch MacBook Pro an all-round powerhouse, with the new Thunderbolt I/O port as an added bonus.

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The 15-inch MacBook Pro moves from Intel's original Core i-series CPUs to the latest second-generation chips, formerly code-named Sandy Bridge. Not only that, you can forget about seeing an Intel Core i5 CPU in your 15-inch (or 17-inch) MacBook Pro — these use high-end quad-core Core i7 chips now. Our step-up AU$2499 review unit had a 2.2GHz quad-core i7, with 4GB of RAM and a huge 750GB hard drive (at only 5400rpm, however).

The biggest surprise is the 15-inch MacBook Pro's graphics processor. Instead of the Nvidia GeForce 330M graphics card previously found in these systems, the GPUs now come from Nvidia's long-time rival AMD. The base 15-inch model has an AMD Radeon HD 6490M, and our review unit had an even faster 6750M. With Intel's improved integrated graphics in the 13-inch models, that means that Nvidia has been completely ousted from the MacBook Pro line.

The iconic unibody aluminium construction remains, as does the large glass multi-touch track pad. Most of the ports and connections also remain the same, with one very notable new addition. Where the Mini DisplayPort connection used to be, now an identically sized port is marked with a lightning-bolt icon. That's for Thunderbolt, Intel's new high-speed powered-port technology for data transfer and displays. The Thunderbolt tech is envisioned as a sort of future unified successor to USB, FireWire and DisplayPort, allowing peripherals to carry data and video at 10Gbps (in the video above, we may have had a slip of the tongue and said Mbps, but we meant Gbps).

For now, at least, that promise is hypothetical. We have very little idea of exactly when Thunderbolt-compatible peripherals will be available (although Apple says the first ones should show up in Q2 2011), how much they'll cost, or if Apple will be adding the technology to future displays or iOS devices. For now, it's a wait-and-see gamble on a future technology.

The lowest-cost 15-inch MacBook Pro is AU$2099, following the usual Apple trajectory of adding faster, more powerful components. While we're still waiting for oft-requested extras such as HDMI, Blu-ray and 3G, the speed and power of these new quad-core Core i7 CPUs is extremely impressive, and leaves even other recent MacBook Pros in the dust.

By now, the shape and size of the MacBook Pro should be very familiar. Even more recent Apple designs, such as the second-generation MacBook Air, are basically just variations on it. The core building block remains the same: a solid block of aluminium, which is carved down into a shell with support struts. This unibody chassis has the benefit of being thin (for a 15-inch laptop), but strong and flex-free at the same time.

The touch philosophy that informs the iPad/iPhone line of devices can be said to have its roots in the large multi-touch click pad-style trackpad that's been a staple of the MacBook Pro for years. Of the multi-touch gestures, our favourite is sweeping up or down with four fingers to show or hide all your active windows. Once you get used to that, going back to a regular touch pad is difficult. A few new gestures are apparently coming to the next version of OS X, but you won't see those until mid-year.

Several Windows laptops have added larger click pads over the past year or so, with similar multi-touch gestures, but we can easily say that none can yet compete with the MacBook Pro's implementation.

The 1440x900-pixel display is still a higher resolution than many 15-inch laptops (many of which are 1366x768 pixels), and two screen upgrades are available: a 1680x1050-pixel-resolution version for an extra AU$130, or a 1680x1050-pixel-resolution "anti-glare" version for AU$200. That's a lot more flexibility than the 13-inch MacBook Pro , which still doesn't have a glare-free or higher-resolution screen option (even though the current 13-inch MacBook Air has a stock 1440x900-pixel resolution).

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Where to Buy

Apple MacBook Pro 15 (Early 2011)

Part Number: CNETApple MacBook Pro 15 (Early 2011)

Typical Price: $2,499.00

See manufacturer website for availability.