In the jet stream

Did you read our comprehensive review of Jetta 147TSI and now want more info? Take a closer look under, over, in and out of the Mark V VW Jetta.

This Mark V Jetta sedan is based on the superseded Mark V Golf . While it shares many of the dirty oily bits with the Mark V Golf, the body has been subtly tweaked for its life as a sedan.

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Creased

Apart from the boot, one of the key visual differences between the Mark V Golf and Jetta is a crease line down the side of the car.

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Chrome, part I

We presume the chrome highlights on the side windows and grille are meant to signify that sedans are classier than their hatch siblings.

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Branded

The headlights feature tiny VW emblems on the element that hides the bulb.

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Chrome, part II

Even on the sportiest member of the Jetta family, there's no escaping the chromed koala nose.

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Trivia

The Golf and Jetta come from a time in VW's history where its cars were named winds. The Golf is named after the German word for the Gulf Stream, while the Jetta is named after jet streams.

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2.0 TSI

Europeans like subtlety, and one can't get more subtle than the 147TSI's badging. 2.0 TSI with a red S and I doesn't quite scream GTI does it?

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Another hint

Did you notice that it's got twin tail-pipes? Didn't think so.

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Afterburners

All Jettas come fitted with very cool LED brake and indicator lights.

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Optional wheels

The 147TSI comes standard with 17-inch alloys. One of three 18-inch alloy wheel choices came fitted to our car.

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Wingdings

We love indicators in the mirrors as much as the man, but when the Jetta's flash they can be seen from the driver's pew, which can be a bit distracting.

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Chrome, part III

That grille's so shiny you could do your hair or make-up in it.

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Petrol power

The updated Mark V Jetta range has two petrol engines on offer: a turbocharged and supercharged 1.4-litre (dubbed 118TSI), and a turbocharged 2-litre (the Jetta 147TSI above). The 118TSI's engine is a less powerful, more economical version of the one we sampled in the Golf GT Sport TSI .

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Diesel grunt

Three turbo-diesel engines are offered on 2010 Jettas : a 77kW/250Nm 1.6-litre, 103kW/320Nm 2-litre and 125kW/350Nm 2-litre.

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Shift it

Depending on the engine, a variety of transmissions are offered on the Jetta , including five- and six-speed manuals, and six- and seven-speed dual-clutch automatics.

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Power to the people

The 147TSI's 2-litre turbocharged four-cylinder petrol engine produces 147kW of power (hence the 147TSI branding) and 280Nm of torque.

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Feel the expense

A soft-touch dashboard, metal plated bits and pieces, switches that are sharply lit and click with authority, and a wonderfully grained leather steering wheel make the Jetta feel classy and special.

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I feel the need, the need for speed

The speedometer with its markings every 5km/h between zero and 60km/h, and markings per 10km/h beyond that, add to the impression of formidable speed and acceleration.

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Leather seats

The 147TSI and 125TDI's sports seats provide a good amount of grip when you're flinging the Jetta around. The optional leather covering feels rather nice too, but it's disappointing that the accountants pinched a few euros by using the standard cloth covering for the side closest to the centre tunnel.

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Tray

A slide-out drawer is hidden below both the driver and front passenger's seat. The driver's side unit disappears when you pony up the dollars for the electric driver's seat though.

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Out back

Rear-seat accommodation is decent, but not spectacular.

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Cavernous

With a volume of over 500 litres the boot is not only long and deep, but could also house a small tribe of Neanderthals.

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TAB? Don't mind if I do

A neat little tab pops up whenever the seat back isn't fully latched.

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Flat out

The rear seats split-fold, but don't lie completely flat.

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Rest, part I

The fold-down rear-seat arm rest...

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Rest, part II

...hides a ski port.

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Hooked

A fold down luggage hook keeps your groceries safe and secure for their trip home.

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Temp

A temporary spare wheel lives underneath the boot floor.

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Little luxuries

Rear-seat passengers enjoy their own set of air vents, as well as a set of adjustable cup holders.

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Party trick, part I

A sliding cover hides storage cubby cum cup holders in the centre console. The divider for which...

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Party trick, part II

...doubles up as a bottle opener.

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Buttons ahoy!

Our 147TSI came with switchable stability control, tyre pressure monitors, and front- and rear-parking sensors.

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Optical parking

Flick the car into reverse, or press the parking sensor button, and potential objects are shown on the entertainment display.

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Double up

The indicator and high-beam stalk also manipulates the cruise control system, with the set speed appearing in the LCD screen between the speedo and tacho.

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Light me up

Xenon headlights are an option and of great benefit on rural roads, but lack the ability to follow one's steering inputs.

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Multiple zones of command

Dual-zone climate control air conditioning is standard on all Jetta models, except the entry-level 77TDI.

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Warm bum

Heated front seats are part of the package if you opt for leather seats.

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Warm wing

Heated electric wing mirrors are standard.

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Auto tint

The rear-view mirror automatically dims itself when faced with blinding lights — not available on the 77TDI.

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Wheeee!

Electric adjustment for the driver's seat is part of the leather-seating package.

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Up and down

Unless you tick the box marked flappy paddles, the stubby gear lever is the only way to manually change gears in double-clutch-equipped vehicles.

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Wheel controls, part I

Steering audio controls are standard across the Jetta family.

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Wheel controls, part II

The multifunction display in between the speedometer and tachometer (seen in the background) is manipulated by a set of controls on the right steering wheel spoke.

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MDI

To get USB and iPod connectivity you'll have to pay extra for the sound system option with Volkswagen's media device interface. A VW-specific iPod cable will set you back a few extra dollars too.

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3.5mm

All Jettas have an auxiliary jack.

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USB stick

With the MDI installed, USB flash drives can provide plenty of hours of music entertainment.

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SD card

Both the RCD510 and RNS510 audio systems come with an SD card slot. The former is standard on the 125TDI and 147TSI , the latter can be optioned throughout the range.

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RNS510, part I

Those wanting satellite navigation will have to shell out for the RNS510 system . It offers 3D map perspective and limited lane guidance, but not text-to-speech.

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RNS510, part II

The RNS510's disc slot can read CD audio and data discs, as well as DVD video.

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RNS510, part III

Despite the presence of a Traffic button, traffic information isn't available in Australia.

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RNS510, part IV

As much as we love the RNS510 system , we wish there was a QWERTY keyboard option.

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RNS510, part V

The media screen allows you to easily switch between different tracks, albums, folder and music storage types.

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RNS510, part VI

USB drives and SD cards, as well as the RNS510's hard-disk, are navigated folder by folder.

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RNS510, part VII

Upcoming turns can be viewed in a pop-up window.

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MFD, part I

The LCD display or multifunction display (MFD) in the instrument panel can be used to show the next turn instructions. It certainly seems quicker and safer to quickly glance at the MFD than to look across to the RNS510's big 6.5-inch screen.

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MFD, part II

A range of settings, from light delays to displayed data, can be configured via the MFD.

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MFD, part III

Want fuel consumption, temperature info and other stats? The MFD's got it.

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MFD, part IV

Track or station info can be shown on the MFD, saving drivers from having to look at the stereo's more distant screen.

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MFD, part V

No destination entered? Fine, the MFD will happily show you a compass reading instead.

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