Twitter lays down the law: don't touch the bird

If you've looked closely at Twitter recently, then you may have noticed that the site has, ever so slightly, redesigned its bird logo.

If you've looked closely at Twitter recently, then you may have noticed that the site has, ever so slightly, redesigned its bird logo.

Twitter usage guidelines
(Credit: Twitter)

As reported by The Guardian, to go along with the change, Twitter has issued a series of edicts about how the newly revised logo can and cannot be used, which we've listed below.

Do:

  • Use our official, unmodified Twitter bird to represent our brand

  • Make sure the bird faces right

  • Allow for at least 150 per cent buffer space around the bird.

Don't:

  • Use speech bubbles or words around the bird

  • Rotate or change the direction of the bird

  • Animate the bird

  • Duplicate the bird

  • Change the colour of the bird

  • Use any other marks or logos to represent our brand.

We wonder, though, whether by issuing such specific and nay-saying guidelines, the company, which champions free speech throughout the world, is inadvertently baiting users to do exactly what it doesn't want them to do.

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