Sigma sets a price for its new 24-105mm f4 lens: $899

The general-purpose zoom lens costs about $100 more than Canon's equivalent, but Sigma thinks its image quality means the lens is worth the extra money.

Sigma's 24-105mm F4 DG OS HSM with its petal-shaped lens hood.
Sigma's 24-105mm F4 DG OS HSM with its petal-shaped lens hood. Sigma

The Sigma 24-105mm F4 DG OS HSM lens will cost about $899 when it starts shipping in November for Canon SLR cameras, the Japanese lensmaker said Friday.

The all-around zoom lens will ship for Nikon and Sigma cameras in December, with Sony support "soon" afterward, Sigma said at the PhotoPlus Expo in New York.

The 24-105mm is aimed squarely at Canon's EF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM, which often ships as the kit lens with high-end full-frame SLRs like the EOS 5D Mark III and which has a standalone price of about $800.

Sigma, which hit a home run with its 35mm f1.4 DG HSM that arrived earlier this year, is clearly hoping for more successes with its new "art" line of higher-end lenses. In its announcement, Sigma boasts of the 24-105mm use of very low-dispersion glass aspheric lens elements to cut down on chromatic aberration, distortion, and other optical problems.

"Unlike lenses with similar specifications, this lens overcomes low peripheral brightness," Sigma added, though refraining from mentioning Canon specifically. According to DxO Labs' measurements, the Canon 24-105mm lens loses more than a full stop of exposure in the corners of the frame on average, and more than 2 stops at the 24mm end of the zoom range.

Sigma's lens also includes optical stabilization, weighs 885g (31.2oz), has a close-focus distance of 45cm (about 18 inches), a maximum magnification ratio of 1:4.6, and 9 curved aperture blades.

Unlike Canon's 24-105mm lens, though, Sigma's doesn't have any sealing against water or dust.

Sigma's 24-105mm F4 DG OS HSM
Sigma's 24-105mm F4 DG OS HSM Sigma

About the author

Stephen Shankland has been a reporter at CNET since 1998 and covers browsers, Web development, digital photography and new technology. In the past he has been CNET's beat reporter for Google, Yahoo, Linux, open-source software, servers and supercomputers. He has a soft spot in his heart for standards groups and I/O interfaces.

 

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