Retina iPad mini displays fewer colours than iPad Air, other tablets

AnandTech's review of the new iPad mini shows it has a smaller colour range than the iPad Air, as well as other tablets like the new Nexus 7 and Amazon's Kindle Fire HDX 8.9.

AnandTech's review of the new iPad mini shows it has a smaller colour range than the iPad Air, as well as other tablets like the new Nexus 7 and Amazon's Kindle Fire HDX 8.9.

Apple's iPad Air and iPad mini. (Credit: Apple)

According to AnandTech, the iPad mini's colour gamut hasn't changed since the original mini and comes up short, especially in displaying red, blue and magenta tones. Where the iPad 4 and iPad Air meet and exceed the sRGB colour gamut standard, the iPad mini is unable to. This is a standard that most tablets tested by AnandTech, including the 2013 Google Nexus 7 and the Amazon Kindle Fire HDX 8.9, are able to meet.

This isn't a critical issue, but the difference between the two newest Apple tablets is "small but apparent", with the Air able to show more colours than the mini, which may turn discerning buyers, like photographers, away from the 7.9-inch model. The iPad mini's screen is nonetheless greatly improved from the original mini, which used a comparatively low-resolution display.

The new iPad mini passed the AnandTech image-retention test with flying colours, though, with no visible trace of previous images lingering on the display. Similarly, overall colour accuracy and greyscale performance are good, as is the mini's default colour temperature, which is closer to daylight white than any other competing tablet.

Interestingly, the new, low-cost Google Nexus 7, built by Asus, uses a Full HD 7-inch screen that beats all comers in contrast ratio and white level at maximum brightness and equals the mini and Air in black level at minimum brightness.

The Apple iPad mini with Retina display starts at AU$479 for a 16GB Wi-Fi-only model and can cost as much as AU$949 for the 128GB 4G-enabled version.

 

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