Production said to begin soon on both iPhone 6 models

The iPhone 6 is headed for mass production, according to local Taiwanese media. That could mean a rumored September launch for at least one of the models is on track.

iphone-side-small.jpg
Apple

Large-scale production of both next-generation iPhone models is imminent, according to reports from Asia.

Taiwan-based Hon Hai Precision, aka Foxconn, will begin production of the 4.7-inch version of the rumored iPhone 6 next week, while the 5.5-inch model should see production kick off during the second week of August, Reuters reported, citing local Chinese media.

A separate report from a China state-run news service said Hon Hai is slated to hire 100,000 workers at its "mainland facilities" to make the phone, according to Reuters. Pegatron, another Taiwan-based contract manufacturer, has begun to recruit "over 10,000 workers," according to the above Taiwan-based report.

If the reports are accurate, the production schedule would fit a rumored September launch of the new Apple phone.

The report, however, doesn't address a series of rumors about production problems with the larger, phablet-class 5.5-inch model.

Reports earlier in the week said the 5.5-incher would be delayed. In that report, respected KGI Securities analyst Ming-Chi Kuo said the 5.5-inch iPhone 6 may not launch by the end of 2014, or may launch after October in very limited quantities.

Both models are expected to be extremely thin, by iPhone standards, rivaling the thinness of the iPod Touch. This has led to sticky production issues for both models but especially for the 5.5-inch device, according to Kuo.

Other rumored new features for the iPhone 6 include an improved camera and larger-capacity flash storage.

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iPod Touch: the iPhone 6 is expected to boast a thickness similar to the ultrathin iPod Touch. Apple

About the author

Brooke Crothers writes about mobile computer systems, including laptops, tablets, smartphones: how they define the computing experience and the hardware that makes them tick. He has served as an editor at large at CNET News and a contributing reporter to The New York Times' Bits and Technology sections. His interest in things small began when living in Tokyo in a very small apartment for a very long time.

 

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