One step closer to Stark: 3D printing gets a little more awesome

It'll be a little while before we can make our own fully functional Iron Man suit in the comfort of our own home. But by all indications, that's the way we're heading.

It'll be a little while before we can make our own fully functional Iron Man suit in the comfort of our own home. But by all indications, that's the way we're heading.

The rise and fall in resistance can be used for communication. (Credit: University of Warwick)

Frustrated that 3D printing was pretty much limited to hard plastics, University of Warwick researchers have widened the materials field by creating an electrically conductive plastic called "carbomorph", opening the way for sensors and circuits to be built directly in to 3D-printed objects.

Wired is reporting that the researchers want to make the information available for all, and so have made a free paper available on how to make the stuff, providing you're familiar with the required safety equipment.

Now, if we can get started on metals and rocket boots...

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Printers
About the author

Craig was sucked into the endless vortex of tech at an early age, only to be spat back out babbling things like "phase-locked-loop crystal oscillators!". Mostly this receives a pat on the head from the listener, followed closely by a question about what laptop they should buy.

 

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