Nokia Lumia 920 is first Windows Phone with PureView camera

Nokia unwrapped its flagship Windows Phone 8 smartphone overnight, delivering its PureView imaging technology to the Microsoft-made mobile platform.

Nokia unwrapped its flagship Windows Phone 8 smartphone overnight, delivering its PureView imaging technology to the Microsoft-made mobile platform.

the new Nokia Lumia 920, in delightful banana yellow. (Credit: Nokia)

"The Nokia Lumia 920 captures better images and video than any competitor smartphone," said Nokia's Jo Harlow at the phone's launch event in New York.

The camera doesn't have the 41-megapixel (MP) resolution of the PureView 808 phone that was released earlier this year, with a more conventional 8MP sensor in its place. It does have the same oversampling image capture that defines the PureView branding, so the images taken should be of a similar quality to those that critics have raved about in the 808.

It also has an image-stabilisation system that Nokia is calling a "floating lens". Comprised of many small springs, the floating lens reacts to a users movements, however slight, to make sure that the final image isn't ruined by judder.

Aside from imaging, Nokia is also boasting an improved touchscreen experience on its latest smartphones, with new tech from touch partners Synaptics. Dubbed ClearPad Series 3, the new Synaptics touch tech can apparently be used when the gloves are being worn or when the users has long fingernails.

The Lumia 920 will run on the new Microsoft Windows Phone 8 platform, and will be one the first phones on the platform to sport an HD-resolution screen. The handset ships with a 4.5-inch IPS LCD with a 1280x768-pixel panel, equating to a pixel density of about 332 pixels per inch.

Nokia chose a dual-core Qualcomm S4 processor to power the 920, with 1GB of RAM and 32GB of internal storage. The phone also has an NFC chip built-in and hardware to support wireless charging on a selection of Nokia-designed charging stations. The Lumia 920 comes with a 2000mAh battery built in to the handset, which should be sufficient for a solid day's worth of use.

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About the author

Joe capitalises on a life-long love of blinking lights and upbeat MIDI soundtracks covering the latest developments in smartphones and tablet computers. When not ruining his eyesight staring at small screens, Joe ruins his eyesight playing video games and watching movies.

 

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