Killer 2100 network gaming card: No more excuses

Bigfoot Networks releases the new Killer 2100 NIC that's optimized for online gaming and costs $129.

'Nuff said. Bigfoot Networks

I don't know about other gamers, but whenever I lose in an online game, which is more often than I want to admit, I immediately look for excuses. And I have just found another one: not having the Killer 2100 network interface card .

The card was announced Tuesday by Bigfoot Networks, maker of the Killer Xeno network card, which was released a year ago.

Supposedly, the Killer 2100 ignores Windows and goes straight to your games. Bigfoot Networks.

According to the company, the Killer 2100 combines speed, intelligence, and control demanded by gamers while significantly reducing latency. It also comes with software that lets users maximize the control of the card's functionality and the network connection.

Specs-wise, the Killer 2100 looks impressive indeed. The card incorporates what Bigfoot Networks calls "groundbreaking Game Networking DNA technology," which includes advanced game detect technology to detect what game's being played and adjust bandwith accordingly; support for Windows stack bypass; visual bandwidth control; and more. The card itself has a dedicated network processor that runs at 400MHz and 128MB of DDR2 RAM.

Bigfoot Networks claims the Game Networking DNA is designed to accelerate latency sensitive game traffic while reducing stuttering, freezing, and other symptoms of lag.

The Killer 2100 will be available in a few weeks and is slated to cost $129, which is rather expensive, considering all gaming computers already have a gigabit network port. Despite how enticing this card sounds, the price is high enough that I'd rather keep my money--and my excuses.

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