How TomTom got its name and what's next for GPS sat nav

In an interesting interview with The Guardian, TomTom's founder Harold Goddijn talks about the company's genesis, as well as how it hopes to reverse declining sales and falling profits.

In an interesting interview with The Guardian, TomTom's founder Harold Goddijn talks about the company's genesis, as well as how it hopes to reverse declining sales and falling profits.

One of the "big three" in Australia, along with Navman and Garmin, TomTom started out as a joint venture with phone maker Ericsson in the late 1990s. When trying to come up with a name for the nascent business Tom was the leading choice, but due to its generic nature the name would not have been registrable as a trademark.

During the interview, Goddijn reflects that the decision to go with the personable — and registrable — TomTom name contributed to the company's success. He also reminisces about how — prior to his directive that upcoming devices be "buy, take out of box, drive home" — sat navs were, prior to 2004, a complicated jumble of CD-ROM discs, wires and PDAs.

To find out more about how the company is hoping that its HD Traffic service, recently launched in Australia in its Go Live range, and deals with car makers, such as Renault and Toyota, will ensure its future, check out his interview with Juliette Garside.>

Via The Guardian.

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