Googling clean energy: Green tech week in review

Google's ponies up for renewables; sucking up CO2 for baking soda; corn ethanol doubts multiply; 'ocean fertilization' draws fire; and the EPA to weigh in on 'greenwashing.'

Google to enter clean-energy business. It's a search engine, it's a $700 stock, it's a clean energy investor. Google surprised many this week with plans to get into the renewable energy business. Skeptics and fans await results. Roundup.

Can baking soda curb global warming? A start-up in Texas says it can turn the carbon dioxide emitted by power plants into baking soda. CNET News.com.

Ethanol Craze Cools As Doubts Multiply. Corn-based ethanol is considered renewable energy but it continues to draw fire from environmentalists, locations that host refineries, and, increasingly, investors. The Wall Street Journal.

Cleaning Up Greenwashing. The U.S. Federal Trade Commission will review "green" marketing guidelines. Greentech Media.

New research discredits a $100 billion fix to global warming. Stanford and Oregon State Universities criticize geoengineering practice of ocean fertilization to combat climate change. Press Release.

Here Comes Pond Scum Power. BusinessWeek talks to experts and finds that commercial biodiesel from algae is a few years away.

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About the author

Martin LaMonica is a senior writer covering green tech and cutting-edge technologies. He joined CNET in 2002 to cover enterprise IT and Web development and was previously executive editor of IT publication InfoWorld.

 

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