Gene-altered cows avoid mad cow disease

An international team of scientists from the United States and Japan said this week that they genetically altered a dozen cows to lack the proteins called prions that cause mad cow disease, according to a report from the Associated Press. The scientists hope the development will lead to an immunity in cows against the brain-degenerating disease, and in turn, protect people from eating infected beef.

Still, food derived from genetically altered animals must be approved by the Food and Drug Administration.

The scientists are still conducting tests on the genetically engineered cows to ensure their immunity from mad cow disease, which is also known as bovine spongiform encephalopathy, or BSE. It can take up to two years before mad cow can be detected in animals. The results from the tests won't be available until later this year, according to the AP report.

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Details about Apple's 'spaceship' campus from the drone pilot who flies over it

MyithZ has one of the most popular aerial photography channels on YouTube. With the exception of revealing his identity, he is an open book as he shares with CNET's Brian Tong the drone hardware he uses to capture flyover shots of the construction of Apple's new campus, which looks remarkably like an alien craft.

by Brian Tong