Beats Music arriving in Australia, MOG users to be transitioned

The newest music-streaming service on the block will be launching in Australia, with existing users of MOG to be transitioned "when the timing is right".

Following the launch of Beats Music in the US overnight, it has been confirmed that the service will be arriving in Australia, though no exact timing has been revealed.

(Screenshot by CBSi)

The streaming service, spearheaded by Jimmy Iovine, has been in development for some time and was once codenamed Project Daisy. Beats Music is designed to offer a more personalised listening experience compared to other services as it is based around curation from music tastemakers and algorithms.

In 2012, the MOG streaming service was acquired by Beats Electronics with a view to incorporate the catalogue into Project Daisy. MOG continued to operate as a standalone product, but following the launch of Beats Music, it has been revealed that MOG will be shut down on 15 April. Users in the US will have the option of transitioning across to Beats Music.

In Australia, however, MOG has a partnership with Telstra that delivers unmetered streaming to most BigPond and Telstra Mobile customers. A Telstra spokesperson told CNET Australia that Beats Music will be available locally this year, however, further details were not able to be revealed just yet.

"In the meantime, our customers can continue to enjoy the 20 million songs on the MOG service which is unmetered for most Telstra customers and is continually rated as one of the best streaming music services in the world," said the Telstra spokesperson.

"When the timing is right we will be in contact with our MOG subscribers about our plans to ensure a smooth transition on to the Beats Music service".

Beats Music offers a slightly different model to other subscription services on the market, such as Spotify, in that it does not offer a free, ad-supported tier. Instead, users can sign up for a 7-day trial and continue on to the US$9.99 per month option.

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About the author

Lexy spent her formative years taking a lot of photos and dreaming in technicolor. Nothing much has changed now she's covering all things photography related for CNET from the Sydney office.

 

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